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See detailImpact of in vivo T-cell depletion on outcome of AML patients in first CR given peripheral blood stem cells and reduced-intensity conditioning all-SCT from a HLA-identical sibling donor : a report from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Baron, Frédéric ULg; Labopin, M.; Blaise, D. et al

in Bone Marrow Transplantation (2014)

The impact of in vivo T-cell depletion on transplantation outcomes in patients transplanted with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) remains controversial. This study assessed the outcome of 1250 adult ... [more ▼]

The impact of in vivo T-cell depletion on transplantation outcomes in patients transplanted with reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) remains controversial. This study assessed the outcome of 1250 adult patients with de novo AML in first CR (CR1) given PBSC from HLA-identical siblings after chemotherapy-based RIC. A total of 554 patients did not receive any form of in vivo T-cell depletion (control group), whereas antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and alemtuzumab were given in 444 and 252 patients, respectively. The incidences of grade II-IV acute GVHD were 21.4, 17.6 and 10.2% in control, ATG and alemtuzumab patients, respectively (Po0.001). In multivariate analysis, the use of ATG and the use of alemtuzumab were each associated with a lower risk of chronic GVHD (Po0.001 each), but a similar risk of relapse, and of nonrelapse mortality, and similar leukemia-free survival and OS. Further, among patients given BU-based RIC, the use of o6 mg/kg ATG did not increase the risk of relapse (hazard ratio, HR¼1.1), whereas there was a suggestion for higher relapse risk in patients given X6 mg/kg ATG (HR¼1.4, P¼0.08). In summary, these data suggest that a certain amount of in vivo T-cell depletion can be safely used in the conditioning of AML patients in CR1 given PBSC after chemotherapy-based RIC. [less ▲]

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See detailIntensive conventional chemotherapy (ACVBP regimen) compared with standard CHOP for poor-prognosis aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma
Tilly, H.; Lepage, E.; Coiffier, B. et al

in Blood (2003), 102(13), 4284-4289

We conducted a randomized trial to compare the intensive conventional chemotherapy regimen ACVBP (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) with standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide ... [more ▼]

We conducted a randomized trial to compare the intensive conventional chemotherapy regimen ACVBP (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) with standard CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) in previously untreated patients with poor-risk aggressive lymphoma. Patients aged 61 to 69 years who had aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with at least one prognostic factor of the age-adjusted international prognostic index (IPI) were included. ACVBP consisted of an induction phase of intensified chemotherapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis followed by a sequential consolidation phase. Of the 708 patients registered for the study, 635 were eligible. The rate of complete response was 58% in the ACVBP group and 56% in the CHOP group (P =.5). Treatment-related death occurred in 13% of the ACVBP group and 7% of the CHOP group (P =.014). At 5 years, the event-free survival was 39% in the ACVBP group and 29% in the CHOP group (P =.005). The overall survival was significantly longer for patients treated with ACVBP, at 5 years it was 46% compared with 38% for patients treated with CHOP (P =.036). CNS progressions or relapses were more frequent in the CHOP group (P =.004). Despite higher toxicity, the ACVBP regimen, used as first-line treatment for patients with poor-risk aggressive lymphoma, is superior to standard CHOP with regard to both event-free survival and overall survival. (C) 2003 by The American Society of Hematology. [less ▲]

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