References of "Asplund, M"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe PLATO 2.0 Mission
Rauer, H.; Catala, C.; Aerts, C. et al

in Experimental Astronomy (2014)

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental ... [more ▼]

PLATO 2.0 has recently been selected for ESA’s M3 launch opportunity (2022/24). Providing accurate key planet parameters (radius, mass, density and age) in statistical numbers, it addresses fundamental questions such as: How do planetary systems form and evolve? Are there other systems with planets like ours, including potentially habitable planets? The PLATO 2.0 instrument consists of 34 small aperture telescopes (32 with 25 s readout cadence and 2 with 2.5 s candence) providing a wide field-of-view (2232 deg 2) and a large photometric magnitude range (4–16 mag). It focusses on bright (4–11 mag) stars in wide fields to detect and characterize planets down to Earth-size by photometric transits, whose masses can then be determined by ground-based radial-velocity follow-up measurements. Asteroseismology will be performed for these bright stars to obtain highly accurate stellar parameters, including masses and ages. The combination of bright targets and asteroseismology results in high accuracy for the bulk planet parameters: 2 %, 4–10 % and 10 % for planet radii, masses and ages, respectively. The planned baseline observing strategy includes two long pointings (2–3 years) to detect and bulk characterize planets reaching into the habitable zone (HZ) of solar-like stars and an additional step-and-stare phase to cover in total about 50 % of the sky. PLATO 2.0 will observe up to 1,000,000 stars and detect and characterize hundreds of small planets, and thousands of planets in the Neptune to gas giant regime out to the HZ. It will therefore provide the first large-scale catalogue of bulk characterized planets with accurate radii, masses, mean densities and ages. This catalogue will include terrestrial planets at intermediate orbital distances, where surface temperatures are moderate. Coverage of this parameter range with statistical numbers of bulk characterized planets is unique to PLATO 2.0. The PLATO 2.0 catalogue allows us to e.g.: - complete our knowledge of planet diversity for low-mass objects, - correlate the planet mean density-orbital distance distribution with predictions from planet formation theories,- constrain the influence of planet migration and scattering on the architecture of multiple systems, and - specify how planet and system parameters change with host star characteristics, such as type, metallicity and age. The catalogue will allow us to study planets and planetary systems at different evolutionary phases. It will further provide a census for small, low-mass planets. This will serve to identify objects which retained their primordial hydrogen atmosphere and in general the typical characteristics of planets in such low-mass, low-density range. Planets detected by PLATO 2.0 will orbit bright stars and many of them will be targets for future atmosphere spectroscopy exploring their atmosphere. Furthermore, the mission has the potential to detect exomoons, planetary rings, binary and Trojan planets. The planetary science possible with PLATO 2.0 is complemented by its impact on stellar and galactic science via asteroseismology as well as light curves of all kinds of variable stars, together with observations of stellar clusters of different ages. This will allow us to improve stellar models and study stellar activity. A large number of well-known ages from red giant stars will probe the structure and evolution of our Galaxy. Asteroseismic ages of bright stars for different phases of stellar evolution allow calibrating stellar age-rotation relationships. Together with the results of ESA’s Gaia mission, the results of PLATO 2.0 will provide a huge legacy to planetary, stellar and galactic science. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe radius and mass of the close solar twin 18 Scorpii derived from asteroseismology and interferometry
Bazot, Michaël; Ireland, M. J.; Huber, D. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2011), 526

The growing interest in solar twins is motivated by the possibility of comparing them directly to the Sun. To carry on this kind of analysis, we need to know their physical characteristics with precision ... [more ▼]

The growing interest in solar twins is motivated by the possibility of comparing them directly to the Sun. To carry on this kind of analysis, we need to know their physical characteristics with precision. Our first objective is to use asteroseismology and interferometry on the brightest of them: 18 Sco. We observed the star during 12 nights with HARPS for seismology and used the PAVO beam-combiner at CHARA for interferometry. An average large frequency separation 134.4 ± 0.3 μHz and angular and linear radiuses of 0.6759 ± 0.0062 mas and 1.010 ± 0.009 Rsun were estimated. We used these values to derive the mass of the star, 1.02 ± 0.03 Msun. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperimental and theoretical radiative decay rates for highly excited ruthenium atomic levels and the solar abundance of ruthenium
Fivet, V.; Quinet, Pascal ULg; Palmeri, P. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2009), 396

The solar photospheric abundance of ruthenium is revised on the basis of a new set of oscillator strengths derived for Ru I transitions with wavelengths in the spectral range 2250–4710 Å. The new ... [more ▼]

The solar photospheric abundance of ruthenium is revised on the basis of a new set of oscillator strengths derived for Ru I transitions with wavelengths in the spectral range 2250–4710 Å. The new abundance value (in the usual logarithmic scale where the solar hydrogen abundance is equal to 12.00), ARu = 1.72 ± 0.10, is in agreement with the most recent meteoritic result, ARu = 1.76 ± 0.03. The accuracy of the transition probabilities, obtained using a relativistic Hartree–Fock model including core-polarization effects, has been assessed by comparing the theoretical lifetimes with previous experimental results. A comparison is also made with new measurements performed in this work by the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for 10 highly excited odd-parity levels of Ru I [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical abundances in 43 metal-poor stars
Jonsell, K.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2005), 440

We have derived abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Ba for 43 metal-poor field stars in the solar neighbourhood, most of them subgiants or turn-off-point stars with iron ... [more ▼]

We have derived abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Ba for 43 metal-poor field stars in the solar neighbourhood, most of them subgiants or turn-off-point stars with iron abundances [Fe/H] ranging from -0.4 to -3.0. About half of this sample has not been spectroscopically analysed in detail before. Effective temperatures were estimated from uvby photometry, and surface gravities primarily from Hipparcos parallaxes. The analysis is differential relative to the Sun, and was carried out with plane-parallel MARCS models. Various sources of error are discussed and found to contribute a total error of about 0.1-0.2 dex for most elements, while relative abundances, such as [Ca/Fe], are most probably more accurate. For the oxygen abundances, determined in an NLTE analysis of the 7774 Å triplet lines, the errors may be somewhat larger. We made a detailed comparison with similar studies and traced the reasons for the, in most cases, relatively small differences. Among the results we find that [O/Fe] possibly increases beyond [Fe/H] = -1.0, though considerably less so than in results obtained by others from abundances based on OH lines. We did not trace any tendency toward strong overionization of iron, and find the excesses, relative to Fe and the Sun, of the alpha elements Mg, Si, and Ca to be smaller than those of O. We discuss some indications that also the abundances of different alpha elements relative to Fe vary and the possibility that some of the scatter around the trends in abundances relative to iron may be real. This may support the idea that the formation of Halo stars occurred in smaller systems with different star formation rates. We verify the finding by Gratton et al. (2003b, A&A, 406, 131) that stars that do not participate in the rotation of the galactic disk show a lower mean and larger spread in [ alpha/Fe] than stars participating in the general rotation. The latter stars also seem to show some correlation between [ alpha/Fe] and rotation speed. We trace some stars with peculiar abundances, among these two Ba stars, <ASTROBJ>HD 17072</ASTROBJ> and <ASTROBJ>HD 196944</ASTROBJ>, the second already known to be rich in s elements. Finally we advocate that a spectroscopic study of a larger sample of halo stars with well-defined selection criteria is very important, in order to add to the very considerable efforts that various groups have already made. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)