References of "Arung, Willy"
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See detailEffects of Parecoxib on The Prevention of Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions in Rats.
Arung, Willy; Jehaes, Francois; Cheramy, Jean-Paul et al

in Journal of Investigative Surgery : The Official Journal of the Academy of Surgical Research (2013), 26(6), 340-346

ABSTRACT Background: No systemic preventive therapy has been successful in inhibiting the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs). Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Background: No systemic preventive therapy has been successful in inhibiting the development of postoperative peritoneal adhesions (PPAs). Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of 5 day administration of parecoxib, on PPA prevention and on suture or wound healing in rats. Methods: In a model of PPAs induced by peritoneal electrical burn, 30 rats were randomized into 3 groups according to parecoxib administration route (control; intraperitoneal (IP); intramuscular (IM)). Plasma and peritoneal levels of PAI-1 and tPA were measured at T0, after 90 min of surgery (T90), and on postoperative day 10 (D10). In a cecum resection model, 20 rats were randomized into two groups (control and IP parecoxib), and abdominal wound healing and suture leakage were assessed at D10. In both models, PPAs were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively on D10. Results: Administration of parecoxib significantly decreased the quantity (p < .05) and the severity (p < .01) of PPAs in both models. In addition, parecoxib administration did not cause healing defects or infectious complications in the two models. In the peritoneal burn model, IP or IM parecoxib administration inhibited the increase of postoperative plasma and peritoneum PAI-1 levels, an increase that was observed in the control group (p < .01). No anastomosis leakage could be demonstrated in both groups in the cecum resection model. Conclusion: This study showed that, in these rat models, parecoxib might reduce PPA formation. Confirmation of the safety of parecoxib on intestinal anastomoses is required and should be investigated in further animal models. [less ▲]

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See detailMosquito net for abdominal wall repair: a comparison of their chemical, physical, morphological and mechanical properties to commercial meshes
Sevrin, Chantal ULg; Nsadi Fwene, Berthier; Arung, Willy et al

in Biomedica proceedings (2013, June 23)

Meshes are the actual standard in abdominal wall repair. Commercial medical meshes are however either unavailable or unaffordable too expensive for developing countries. Therefore in most resource-poor ... [more ▼]

Meshes are the actual standard in abdominal wall repair. Commercial medical meshes are however either unavailable or unaffordable too expensive for developing countries. Therefore in most resource-poor developing countries a traditional sutured repair is still commonplace although with significantly inferior results. Sterilized mosquito nets have been recently roposed by several authors to replace medical meshes in low-income countries . However in the perspective of their clinical use a better understanding of this mosquito net is obviously requested both in terms of material properties and of in vivo biocompatibility. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraperitoneal Adhesions After Open or Laparoscopic Abdominal Procedure: An Experimental Study in the Rat.
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; Honoré, Pierre ULg et al

in Surgical Endoscopy (2013), 27

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See detailIntraperitoneal Adhesions After Open or Laparoscopic Abdominal Procedure: An Experimental Study in the Rat.
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A. (2012), 22(7), 651-657

Abstract Background: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO(2 ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO(2) pneumoperitoneum is also widely discussed. This study aimed to compare adhesion formation following peritoneal injury by electrocoagulation performed through open or laparoscopic procedures in a rat model. Materials and Methods: Sixty male rats were randomized to undergo a 1.5-cm peritoneal injury with unipolar cautery under general anesthesia: open surgery (Group A, n=20), laparoscopic surgery with CO(2) pneumoperitoneum (Group B, n=20), and laparoscopic surgery with air pneumoperitoneum (Group C, n=20). Duration of the procedures was fixed at 90 minutes in all groups, and pneumoperitoneum pressure was kept at 10 mm Hg. Ten days later, the animals underwent a secondary laparotomy to score peritoneal adhesions using qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results: Forty-five rats developed at least one adhesion: 95% in Group A, 83% in Group B, and 55% in Group C (P<.01; Group C versus Group A, P<.01). According to number, thickness, tenacity, vascularization, extent, type, and grading according to the Zuhkle classification, no significant difference was observed between Groups A and B. The distribution of adhesions after open surgery was significantly different than after laparoscopic surgery (P<.001). It is interesting that Group C rats developed significantly fewer adhesions at the traumatized site, and their adhesions had less severe qualitative scores compared with those after open surgery (P<.01). Conclusions: In this animal model, CO(2) laparoscopic surgery did not decrease the formation of postoperative adhesion, compared with open surgery. The difference with the animals operated on with air pneumoperitoneum emphasizes the role of CO(2) in peritoneal injury leading to adhesion formation. [less ▲]

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See detailINTRAPERITONEAL ADHESIONS AFTER OPEN OR LAPAROSCOPIC ABDOMINAL PROCEDURE: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY IN THE RAT
Arung, Willy; Drion, Pierre ULg; CHERAMY-BIEN, Jean-Paul ULg et al

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (2012, May), 112(3), 8546

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Adhesion formation is common after abdominal surgery. The incidence and severity of adhesion formation following open or laparoscopic surgery remain controversial. The role of CO2 pneumoperitoneum is also largely discussed. This study aimed to compare adhesion formation following peritoneal injury by electrocoagulation performed through open or laparoscopic procedures in a rat model. Methods: Sixty male rats were randomized to undergo a 1.5cm peritoneal injury with unipolar cautery under general anesthesia: open surgery (group A, n=20), laparoscopic surgery with CO2 pneumoperitoneum (group B, n=20) and laparoscopic surgery with air pneumoperitoneum (group C, n=20). Duration of the procedures was fixed at 90 minutes in all groups, and pneumoperitoneum pressure at 10mmHg. Ten days later, the animals underwent a secondary laparotomy to score peritoneal adhesions using qualitative and quantitative parameters. Results: Forty-five rats developed at least one adhesion, respectively 95% in group A, 83% in group B and 55% in group C (P<0.01; Group C vs Group A, P<0.01). According to number, thickness, tenacity, vascularization, extent, type, and grading according to Zühkle classification, no significant difference was observed between groups A and B. The distribution of adhesions after open surgery was significantly different than after laparoscopic surgery (P<0.001). Interestingly, group C rats developed significantly less adhesions at the traumatized site, and their adhesions had less severe qualitative scores compared to open surgery (P<0.01). Conclusions: In this animal model, CO2 laparoscopic surgery did not decrease the formation of postoperative adhesion, compared to open surgery. The difference with the animals operated with air pneumoperitoneum emphasizes the role of CO2 in peritoneal injury leading to adhesion formation. [less ▲]

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See detailPathophysiology and prevention of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.
Arung, Willy; Meurisse, Michel ULg; DETRY, Olivier ULg

in World Journal of Gastroenterology (2011), 17(41), 4545-53

Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be ... [more ▼]

Peritoneal adhesions represent an important clinical challenge in gastrointestinal surgery. Peritoneal adhesions are a consequence of peritoneal irritation by infection or surgical trauma, and may be considered as the pathological part of healing following any peritoneal injury, particularly due to abdominal surgery. The balance between fibrin deposition and degradation is critical in determining normal peritoneal healing or adhesion formation. Postoperative peritoneal adhesions are a major cause of morbidity resulting in multiple complications, many of which may manifest several years after the initial surgical procedure. In addition to acute small bowel obstruction, peritoneal adhesions may cause pelvic or abdominal pain, and infertility. In this paper, the authors reviewed the epidemiology, pathogenesis and various prevention strategies of adhesion formation, using Medline and PubMed search. Several preventive agents against postoperative peritoneal adhesions have been investigated. Their role aims in activating fibrinolysis, hampering coagulation, diminishing the inflammatory response, inhibiting collagen synthesis or creating a barrier between adjacent wound surfaces. Their results are encouraging but most of them are contradictory and achieved mostly in animal model. Until additional findings from future clinical researches, only a meticulous surgery can be recommended to reduce unnecessary morbidity and mortality rates from these untoward effects of surgery. In the current state of knowledge, pre-clinical or clinical studies are still necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of the several proposed prevention strategies of postoperative peritoneal adhesions. [less ▲]

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