References of "Angel, Lucie"
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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 54

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See detailDifferential effects of aging on the neural correlates of recollection and familiarity
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty ... [more ▼]

The present experiment aimed to investigate age differences in the neural correlates of familiarity and recollection, while keeping performance similar across age groups by varying task difficulty. Twenty young and twenty older adults performed an episodic memory task in an event-related fMRI design. At encoding, participants were presented with pictures, either once or twice. Then, they performed a recognition task, with a Remember/Know paradigm. A similar performance was observed for the two groups in the Easy condition for recollection and in the Hard condition for familiarity. Imaging data revealed the classic recollection-related and familiarity-related networks, common to young and older groups. In addition, we observed that some activity related to recollection (left frontal, left temporal, left parietal cortices and left parahippocampus) and familiarity (bilateral anterior cingulate, right frontal gyrus and left superior temporal gyrus) was reduced in older compared to young adults. However, for recollection processes only, older adults additionally recruited the right precuneus, possibly to successfully compensate for their difficulties, as suggested by a positive correlation between recollection and precuneus activity. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2013), 27(Suppl 1), 48

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailSelf-appraisal and medial prefrontal activation in early stage Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

Poster (2012, June 12)

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex ... [more ▼]

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC; Northoff et al., 2006). Little is know about the engagement of these structures during self-referential processing at different stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The PCC and the MPFC have been found to be activated during a self-appraisal task of adjectives in patients at very early stage of the disease (patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment, MCI; Ries et al., 2006). In contrast, in a similar task, Ruby et al. (2009) have found that mild demented patients activated the dorsal part of the MPFC (DMPFC) to a lesser extent than healthy controls (HC). Ruby et al. did not assess depression symptoms in their patients. Yet, MPFC activations have been found to be modified during self-referential processing in depressed participants (Lemogne et al., 2012). Therefore, in this study, we examined brain correlates of self-appraisal processing in AD patients when controlling for depressive symptoms. Methods Twenty-two mild AD patients and 22 HC matched on age, level of education and gender (respectively: 76±5y; 11±3y; 12M10F) to the AD patients (respectively: 76±7y; 11±3y; 11M11F) were recruited. To control for dementia severity and depression, the participants were administrated the Mattis Dementia Rating (MDR) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). A self-appraisal task intermixed with a recognition task was administered in an fMRI experimentation. In the self-appraisal task, the participants saw adjectives and had to indicate if the trait describes them (Self-condition; SC) or the King Albert II (for men)/the Queen Fabiola (for women; Other-condition; OC). The adjectives were presented in blocks of 6 items. Participants performed 9 runs consisting in one block of SC and one block of OC followed by a recognition phase where participants were presented with the 12 adjectives that they had just previously seen randomly mixed with 12 new adjectives. They were asked to indicate for each adjective whether they had seen it in the previous task. Statistical analyses focused on the self-appraisal task. Brain activations related to the self appraisal process were isolated in each participant by subtracting brain activation related to OC items from brain activation related to SC items. Then at the group level, we examined differences between groups (HC>AD and AD>HC) and a conjunction analysis examined brain activations that were common to both groups. Preprocessing and statistical analyses were performed with SPM8 (p<.001 uncorrected with a-priori hypotheses). Results GDS scores were similar in AD (3±3) and HC (3±3; T(42) = .1; P=.9) groups. No region was found to be significantly more activated during self-appraisal process in HC than in AD and vice versa when performing direct statistical comparison. Moreover, a conjunction analysis revealed that the VMPFC was the only region commonly activated in AD and HC during self-appraisal process (Punc<.001). Conclusions Our results revealed that AD patients engaged the ventral part of the MPFC to a similar extent than HC during self-appraisal judgements. These results and the results found in patients with MCI by Ries et al. (2006) suggest that at initial stages of AD, patients engaged self-related regions when they performed judgements about themselves as HC do. The divergence with the findings by Ruby et al. (2009) may be related either to the fact that they did not controlled for depressive symptoms or to the fact that their patients showed on average lower scores at the MDR (124) than our patients (127). One can assume that engagement of the self-related regions during self-appraisal judgements in the AD patients depends on the severity of the dementia and/or depressive symptoms. In conclusion, MPFC may be engaged during self-referential processing in very mild AD patients without depressive symptoms. References: Lemogne, C., Delaveau, P., Freton, M., Guionnet, S. & Fossati, P. (2012). Medial prefrontal cortex and the self in major depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 136, 1-11. Ries, M. L., Schmitz, T.W., Kawahara, T.N., Torgerson, B.M., Trivedi, M.A. & Johnson, S.C. (2006). Task-dependent posterior cingulated activation in mild cognitive impairment. NeuroImage, 29, 485-492. Ruby, P., Collette, F., D’Argembeau, A., Péters, F., Degueldre, C., Balteau, E., Luxen, A., Maquet, P. & Salmon, E. (2009). Perspective taking to assess self-personality: What’s modified in Alzheimer’s disease ? Neurobiology of Aging, 30(10), 1637-1651. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2012, June)

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See detailSelf-appraisal and medial prefrontal activation in early stage Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Proceedings of the 1st Joint Meeting of the Belgian Association for Psychological Sciences (BAPS, Belgium) and Sociedad Espanola de Psicologia Experimental (SEPEX, Spain) (2012, May 10)

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex ... [more ▼]

Introduction Self-referential processing in healthy subjects is related to activation within cortical midline structures, such as the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and the posterior cingulate cortex (Northoff et al., 2006). The structures are known to be altered in Alzheimer’s disease (AD; Buckner et al., 2008). However, little is known about their engagement during self-referential processing in AD patients. Methods Twenty-two mild AD patients and 22 healthy controls (HC) were administered a self-appraisal task in an fMRI experimentation. The participants saw adjectives and had to indicate if the trait describes them (Self-condition; SC) or the King Albert II/the Queen Fabiola (Other-condition; OC). We examined differences between groups (HC>AD and AD>HC) and a conjunction analysis examined brain activations that were common to both groups during the self-appraisal process (p<.001 uncorrected with a-priori hypotheses). Results No region was found to be significantly more activated during self-appraisal in HC than in AD and vice versa. The VMPFC was the only region commonly activated in AD and HC during self-appraisal process (Punc<.001). Conclusions The study demonstrates that AD patients at early stages of the disease may still engage the MPFC during self-referential processing (compared to a well-known but not close “other”) as HC do. References: Northoff, G., Heinzel, A., de Greck, M., Bermpohl, F., Dobrowolny, H. & Pankseepp, J. (2006). Self-referential processing in our brain-A meta-analysis of imaging studies on the self. NeuroImage, 31, 440-457. Buckner, R.L., Andrews-Hanna, J.R., Schacter, D.L. (2008). The brain’s default network: anatomy, function and relevance to disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1124, 1-38. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Proceedings of the XII Colloque International sur le Vieillissement Cognitif (2012)

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2012)

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See detailSelf-appraisal and medial prefrontal activation in early stage Alzheimer’s disease.
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

Conference (2012)

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See detailAging effect on recollection and familiarity processes
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Scientific conference (2011, December 22)

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