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See detailLow citrulline in Leigh disease: still a biomarker of maternally inherited Leigh syndrome.
Debray, François-Guillaume ULg; Lambert, Marie-Hélène ULg; Allard, Pierre et al

in Journal of Child Neurology (2010), 25(8), 1000-2

Two siblings presented with encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and hypocitrullinemia. Muscle and liver biopsies were considered for respiratory chain studies, but because of hypocitrullinemia, molecular ... [more ▼]

Two siblings presented with encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and hypocitrullinemia. Muscle and liver biopsies were considered for respiratory chain studies, but because of hypocitrullinemia, molecular analysis for maternally inherited Leigh syndrome was first performed, revealing in both siblings the mitochondrial DNA T8993G mutation (95% heteroplasmy), allowing to avoid tissue biopsies. Hypocitrullinemia, an occasional finding in mitochondrial diseases, has been specifically associated with T8993G mutation. However, only few patients have been reported, and the prevalence of hypocitrullinemia in 8993 mitochondrial DNA mutations is unknown. In a small series of 16 Leigh syndrome patients, sensitivity and specificity of hypocitrullinemia (< or = 12 micromol/L) for 8993 mitochondrial DNA mutations were 66% and 85%, respectively. Although studies in larger cohorts are necessary, we suggest considering T8993G mutation early in the diagnostic evaluation of infantile mitochondrial diseases with hypocitrullinemia, which minimizes the need for invasive procedures associated with a small but nonnegligible risk of complications and incorrect diagnosis. [less ▲]

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See detailDiagnostic accuracy of blood lactate-to-pyruvate molar ratio in the differential diagnosis of congenital lactic acidosis.
DEBRAY, François-Guillaume ULg; Mitchell, Grant A; Allard, Pierre et al

in Clinical Chemistry (2007), 53(5), 916-21

BACKGROUND: Although the blood lactate-to-pyruvate (L:P) molar ratio is used to distinguish between pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH-D) and other causes of congenital lactic acidosis (CLA), its ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Although the blood lactate-to-pyruvate (L:P) molar ratio is used to distinguish between pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency (PDH-D) and other causes of congenital lactic acidosis (CLA), its diagnostic accuracy for differentiating between these 2 types of CLA has not been evaluated formally. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of all patients followed for mitochondrial diseases between 1985 and 2005 in a tertiary care pediatric hospital. RESULTS: At the recommended cut point of approximately 25, individual median L:P ratio demonstrated low sensitivity and specificity (77% and 91%, respectively) for differentiating between patients with enzymatically proven PDH-D (n = 11) and those with mitochondrial disease but normal pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity (non-PDH; n = 35). We observed a strong positive association between L:P ratio and blood lactate in non-PDH CLA, whereas this association was weak in PDH-D CLA. Consequently, patient classification based on median L:P ratio showed improved diagnostic accuracy at higher lactate concentrations: for lactate <2.5 mmol/L the area under the ROC curve was not statistically different from 0.5 (P = 0.3), whereas it was statistically different for lactate >2.5 mmol/L. In the 2.5 to 5.0 mmol/L lactate category, the sensitivity and specificity at an optimal cut point of 18.4 were 93% (95% CI, 77%-99%) and 71% (95% CI, 20%-96%), respectively; for lactate >5.0 mmol/L, with an optimal cut point of 25.8, sensitivity and specificity were 96% (95% CI, 77%-99%) and 100% (95% CI, 59%-100%), respectively. CONCLUSION: Usefulness of the L:P ratio for differentiating non-PDH and PDH-D types of CLA increases at higher lactate concentrations. [less ▲]

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