References of "Aguedo, Mario"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpact of purification and fractionation process on the chemical structure and physical properties of locust bean gum
Gillet, Sébastien ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2014)

Crude locust bean gum (CLBG) was purified and fractionated into two parts : the first was obtained by solubilization in water at 25 °C (GM25) and the second consisted in a further extraction at 80 °C on ... [more ▼]

Crude locust bean gum (CLBG) was purified and fractionated into two parts : the first was obtained by solubilization in water at 25 °C (GM25) and the second consisted in a further extraction at 80 °C on the residual impoverished fraction (GM80). The complete structural characterization has shown that GM80 possessed relatively longer chain lengths than GM25, a slightly lower degree of galactose substitution and a somewhat sharper galactosyl distribution in substituted and unsubstituted regions. A physical behavior analysis was carried out on solubilization kinetics, viscosity, viscoelasticity and formation of associated gels with xanthan or carrageenan. The average structure of GM80 generated larger intra-chain, inter-chain and inter-molecular interactions, resulting in the appearance of a stronger network. Small structural differences therefore generated very different physical behaviors. This study thus allowed to establish, in a precise and complete manner, fractionation-purification-structure-function relationships of galactomannans extracted from carob. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExtraction by three processes of arabinoxylans from wheat bran and characterization of the fractions obtained
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Fougnies, Christian; DERMIENCE, Michael ULg et al

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2014), 105

Arabinoxylans (AXs) were extracted from destarched wheat bran (DWB) according to different processes, with a view to their production at industrial scale. Two fractions (F3a and F3b, respectively purified ... [more ▼]

Arabinoxylans (AXs) were extracted from destarched wheat bran (DWB) according to different processes, with a view to their production at industrial scale. Two fractions (F3a and F3b, respectively purified on 10 kDa and 100 kDa ultrafiltration membranes) were obtained with low yields by treating DWB with an endoxylanase and this process left a solid residue exhausted in enzyme-extractable AXs (EDWB). F1 and F2 AX fractions were obtained by treatment with sodium hydroxide of respectively DWB and EDWB. The fraction F4 resulted from a hydrothermal treatment of EDWB in a pressure reactor, followed by ethanol precipitation. The different AX fractions were characterized and compared for the composition in monosaccharides, for the contents in fats and in ferulic, phytic and uronic acids, for the molecular mass distribution and the degrees of methylation and acetylation. The alkaline extractions gave one desesterified AX population with molecular mass (MM) higher than 670 kDa and arabinose/xylose ratios (Ara/Xyl) around 1. The enzyme and thermal treatments yielded AXs with two main populations in size-exclusion chromatography (the largest one at 5-12.5 kDa and a second one at 140-160 kDa), having overall Ara/Xyl of respectively 0.7 and 0.5 for both processes. These data bring information about the influence of the process on the characteristics of AX fractions obtained from pretreated wheat bran. Here are also reported processes that enabled to recover enzyme-unextractable AXs from DWB, including an original and up-scalable hydrothermal extraction. Phytate contents of isolated AXs are described for the first time. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (5 ULg)
See detailLignin as a raw material for industrial materials applications
Richel, Aurore ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl ... [more ▼]

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl, syringyl or p-hydroxyphenyl) linked together by a panel of specific ether or carbon-carbon bonds.[1] Nowadays, large amounts of lignins and lignin-based wastes are available and originate either from the pulp and paper manufacturing or from the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose. [2] Typically, these lignins are dedicated to energetic purposes by combustion. In recent years however, novel axes for high added value applications have emerged and concern, notably, the use of lignin as performance products (e.g. polymer additives, binders) or specialty chemicals (e.g. surface-active agents) for materials applications.[3] Herein, several applications of lignin in materials sciences with industrial issues are presented. A correlation is established between the extraction processes from lignocellulosic materials and the chemical structure and physico-chemical properties of lignins.[4] Our research group has also developed new methodologies for the extraction of highly pure lignins from several starting materials, including food wastes, herbaceous raw materials and wood biomass. These methodologies include microwave-assisted extraction and two-step conventional pretreatment involving steam explosion. These methodologies are described in this presentation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEvaluation of arabinoxylan oligosaccharides on physicochemical properties of chitosan based films
Costa, Maria J.; Cerqueira, Miguel A.; Ruiz, Hector A. et al

in Lagarón, José M.; Cabedo, Luis; López, Amparo (Eds.) et al Polymar 2013 [Recurs electrònic]: 1st. International Conference in polymers with special focus in early stage researchers (2013, November)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLignin as a raw material for industrial materials applications
Richel, Aurore ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Jacquet, Nicolas ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl ... [more ▼]

Native lignin is an abundant biopolymer on earth and represents 15-30% by weight of the lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is a heterogeneous cross-linked polymer composed of phenylpropane units (guaiacyl, syringyl or p-hydroxyphenyl) linked together by a panel of specific ether or carbon-carbon bonds.[1] Nowadays, large amounts of lignins and lignin-based wastes are available and originate either from the pulp and paper manufacturing or from the production of bioethanol from lignocellulose. [2] Typically, these lignins are dedicated to energetic purposes by combustion. In recent years however, novel axes for high added value applications have emerged and concern, notably, the use of lignin as performance products (e.g. polymer additives, binders) or specialty chemicals (e.g. surface-active agents) for materials applications.[3] Herein, several applications of lignin in materials sciences with industrial issues are presented. A correlation is established between the extraction processes from lignocellulosic materials and the chemical structure and physico-chemical properties of lignins.[4] Our research group has also developed new methodologies for the extraction of highly pure lignins from several starting materials, including food wastes, herbaceous raw materials and wood biomass. These methodologies include microwave-assisted extraction and two-step conventional pretreatment involving steam explosion. These methodologies are described in this presentation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailImpact d'un fractionnement soustractif sur la relation structure-fonction de la gomme de caroube
Gillet, Sébastien ULg; Blecker, Christophe ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

Poster (2013, July 02)

Le choix d'une température de fractionnement de la gomme de caroube va conditionner les caractéristiques des fractions obtenues et par conséquent les potentialité d'applications de ces dernières.

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffects of Processing on the Compositions and Physicochemical Properties of Fibre Concentrate from Cooked Fruit Pomaces
Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg; Bchir, Brahim ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Food and Bioprocess Technology (2013)

This study examined the influence of applied tech- nologies namely desugaring, grinding, and bleaching on the compositions (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignins, and pectins), physicochemical properties ... [more ▼]

This study examined the influence of applied tech- nologies namely desugaring, grinding, and bleaching on the compositions (cellulose, hemicelluloses, lignins, and pectins), physicochemical properties (water-holding capacity (WHC), swelling capacity (SWC), oil-holding capacity (OHC)) and the colour of dietary fibre (DF) during the production of fibre concentrates from unusual cooked apple and pear pomaces. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and optical microscopy were also performed to monitor process-induced modifica- tion. All the processing conditions affected the compositions and physicochemical properties of DF. The bleaching treat- ment induced the greatest changes on DF producing yellow cellulose-rich fibre concentrates with improved WHC from 3.2 to 10.0 g/g and improved SWC from 4.0 to 8.8 ml/g. Otherwise, reduction of the particle size influenced hydration properties and colours of DF. WHC and SWC tended to increase with the particle size whereas smaller granulometric size increased the lightness of fibres. Desugaring increased the DF content in both pomaces by 1.2-fold with slight modifica- tion of apple insoluble dietary fibre ratio. Fibre concentrates had improved WHC and SWC up to 1.4-fold. All processes had no significant effect (p < 0.05) on OHC of DF except with ultrafine apple fibre concentrates. Results showed that pro- cessing had overall positive effects on DF contents and hy- dration properties of pomaces from cooked fruits. Bleached fibre concentrates from apple pomace had the highest WHC (10.0 g/g) whereas that of pear had the highest fibre content (89.9 %). Fibres from cooked fruit pomaces may therefore be used as textural ingredients or functional foods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (8 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHydrolysis of starches and flours by sorghum malt amylases for dextrins production
Ba, Khady ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Tine, Emmanuel et al

in European Food Research & Technology (2013)

Corn and wheat starches as well as wheat and cassava flours were hydrolyzed using sorghum malt at 65 °C for 6 hours. During these reactions, dextrose equivalent (DE) values were followed under 3 ... [more ▼]

Corn and wheat starches as well as wheat and cassava flours were hydrolyzed using sorghum malt at 65 °C for 6 hours. During these reactions, dextrose equivalent (DE) values were followed under 3 concentrations of sorghum malt and of calcium chloride. Wheat flour presented the highest DE values and cassava flour had the highest hydrolysis yield. Thus, different dextrins were produced in a pilot plant and were analyzed by HPSEC and HPAEC-PAD for their molecular weight distribution and oligosaccharides composition respectively. The results indicated that oligosaccharides with broad molecular weight distributions were present in the dextrins produced and that the proportion of maltose was very high. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFast and high yield recovery of arabinose from destarched wheat bran
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Vanderghem, Caroline ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg et al

in Industrial Crops & Products (2013), 43

Enzymatically destarched wheat bran (DWB) contained 13.8% of arabinose and 23.1% xylose. Up to a maximum of 70% of the arabinose was progressively released from DWB when heated at 80 or 100°C in media ... [more ▼]

Enzymatically destarched wheat bran (DWB) contained 13.8% of arabinose and 23.1% xylose. Up to a maximum of 70% of the arabinose was progressively released from DWB when heated at 80 or 100°C in media acidified with HCl. Whereas microwave irradiation at higher temperatures in pressure vessels could lead to higher yields of extraction. A Box-Behnken experimental design established an efficient model describing the effects of temperature, irradiation duration and pH on arabinose extraction. The pH appeared as the most important factor of the process. 4-5 min of microwave heating at 150ºC and pH 1 appeared as a fast and highly efficient method to recover more than 90% of the arabinose of DWB. When plotting the percentages of arabinose against the combined severity factors LogR’0 (calculated from the temperature/duration/pH conditions applied), two different fitting profiles were obtained for both the heating techniques. Under microwave heating, high free xylose’s release could also occur. The experimental design led to a quadratic model predicting the release of xylose from DWB. A range of conditions enabled to minimize xylose and hydrolyze around 50% of the total arabinose, yielding a high purity fraction. An alternative would be to release more than 90% of both arabinose and xylose, for further arabinose purification or for a common valorization of both pentoses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (32 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of sugar beet pectic-derived oligosaccharides obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis.
Combo, Agnan Marie Michel ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Quiévy, N et al

in International Journal of Biological Macromolecules (2013), 52(1), 148-156

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (27 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of by-products from cooked fruit processing and potential use in food products
Aguedo, Mario ULg; Kohnen, Stephan; Rabetafika, Holy-Nadia ULg et al

in Journal of Food Composition and Analysis (2012), 27

The process that produces Lie`ge syrup (apple butter-like) results in high amounts of residues from cooked apples, pears and sun-dried dates. These unusual fruit by-products were studied for their ... [more ▼]

The process that produces Lie`ge syrup (apple butter-like) results in high amounts of residues from cooked apples, pears and sun-dried dates. These unusual fruit by-products were studied for their composition in total proteins and fats, dietary fiber (DF) and their content in total and free monosaccharides. All three by-products contained around 20% of total non-cellulosic monosaccharides and around 10% of free monosaccharides. According to two different methods, DF accounted for 70% of the dry weight (DW) with an insignificant soluble fraction; pectin represented 2–3% of DW. Apple and pear residues were composed mainly of cellulose, whereas lignin was the main fraction for dried date. The polyphenolic content and the antioxidant activity of the three products were also assessed and the values showed that their antioxidant characteristics were comparable to that of various raw fruits. No phenolic acids were detected, indicating that the cooking process resulted in their extraction. The lyophilized and ground residues exhibited high water holding capacities (between 5.2 g water per g DW for pear and 8.6 for apple) and average oil holding capacities (around 2.5 g oil per g DW), whereas their color was light brownish as shown by the L*, a*, b* coordinates determined. These data open the possibility to contemplate new specific and niche applications for such by-products. Besides, it provides information about the effects of a cooking process on apple and pear pomaces, as well as on an unusual residue from a dried fruit (date). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (24 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnzymatic hydrolysis of arabinoxylans from spelt bran and hull
Escarnot, Emmanuelle; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg

in Journal of Cereal Science (2012), 55

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnzymatic production of pectic oligosaccharides from polygalacturonic acid with commercial pectinase preparations
Combo, Agnan Marie Michel ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Goffin, Dorothée ULg et al

in Food and Bioproducts Processing: Transactions of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, Part C (2011), 90(3), 588-596

The present study investigates the individual efficiency of six commercial pectinase preparations (Endopolygalacturonase M2, Pectinase, Viscozyme L, Pectinex Ultra SP-L, Pectinase 62L and Macer8 FJ) in ... [more ▼]

The present study investigates the individual efficiency of six commercial pectinase preparations (Endopolygalacturonase M2, Pectinase, Viscozyme L, Pectinex Ultra SP-L, Pectinase 62L and Macer8 FJ) in catalyzing the liberation of pectic oligosaccharides (POS) from polygalacturonic acid. On the basis of high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) analysis of the enzymatic hydrolysates, products release kinetics revealed a random cleavage pattern and an exo mode of cleavage for all the enzymes except for Endopolygalacturonase M2. All six enzymes generated oligoGalA with different degree of polymerization (DP); the quantitative composition of oligoGalA depended on the enzyme specificity and the time of enzymatic reaction. Endopolygalacturonase M2 was the best enzyme preparation for production of oligoGalA, with 18% (wt) of digalacturonic acid and 58% (wt) of trigalacturonic acid after 2h of reaction. Concerning galacturonic acid production, Pectinase 62L was superior to the other enzyme preparations with 47% (wt) after 1h of reaction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (9 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterization of hemicellulosic fractions from spelt hull extracted by different methods
Escarnot, Emmanuelle; Aguedo, Mario ULg; Paquot, Michel ULg

in Carbohydrate Polymers (2011), 85

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe utilization of gum tragacanth to improve the growth of Rhodotorula aurantiaca and the production of γ-decalactone in large scale
Alchihab, Mohamed ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology (2010), 162(1), 233-241

The production of γ-decalactone and 4-hydroxydecanoic acid by the psychrophilic yeast R. aurantiaca was studied. The effect of both compounds on the growth of R. aurantiaca was also investigated and our ... [more ▼]

The production of γ-decalactone and 4-hydroxydecanoic acid by the psychrophilic yeast R. aurantiaca was studied. The effect of both compounds on the growth of R. aurantiaca was also investigated and our results show that γ-decalactone must be one of the limiting factors for its production. The addition of gum tragacanth to the medium at concentrations of 3 and 4 g/l seems to be an adequate strategy to enhance γ-decalactone production and to reduce its toxicity towards the cell. The production of γ-decalactone and 4- hydroxydecanoic acid was significantly higher in 20-l bioreactor than in 100-l bioreactor. By using 20 g/l of castor oil, 6.5 and 4.5 g/l of γ-decalactone were extracted after acidification at pH 2.0 and distillation at 100 °C for 45 min in 20- and 100-l bioreactors, respectively. We propose a process at industrial scale using a psychrophilic yeast to produce naturally γ-decalactone from castor oil which acts also as a detoxifying agent; moreover the process was improved by adding a natural gum. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (33 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProduction d’arômes de type lactone par des levures.
Alchihab, Mohamed ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2010), 14(4), 681-691

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPeroxisomal β-oxidation and Production of γ-decalactone by the Yeast Rhodotorula aurantiaca
Alchihab, Mohamed ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca (2010), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe use of Macronet resins to recover decalactone produced by Rhodotorula aurantiaca from the culture broth
Alchihab, Mohamed ULg; Aldric, Jean-Marc ULg; Aguedo, Mario ULg et al

in Journal of Industrial Microbiology & Biotechnology (2010), 37(2), 167-172

During the biotransformation of castor oil into -decalactone, R. aurantiaca produced both the lactone form and its precursor (4-hydroxydecanoic acid). After six days of culture, a maximum yield of ... [more ▼]

During the biotransformation of castor oil into -decalactone, R. aurantiaca produced both the lactone form and its precursor (4-hydroxydecanoic acid). After six days of culture, a maximum yield of -decalactone of 6.5 g/l was obtained. The parameters of -decalactone adsorption on three Macronet resins (MN-202, MN-102 and MN-100) were investigated in water. Adsorption isotherms of -decalactone for the three Macronet resins were linear. The trapping of -decalactone produced by R. aurantiaca on these resins was then carried out. -Decalactone was eVectively retained by all the studied Macronet resins. The resin MN-202 trapped -decalactone more eYciently than MN-102 and MN-100. The percentages of -decalactone adsorbed on the resins MN-202, MN-102 and MN-100 were, respectively, 85, 75 and 81%, whereas around 70% of the adsorbed -decalactone was then desorbed. We propose an industrial process that uses Macronet resins to extract -decalactone from culture broth of R. aurantiaca. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (30 ULg)