References of "Østensen, R"
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See detailKepler observations of the variability in B-type stars
Balona, L. A.; Pigulski, A.; Cat, P De et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2011), 413

The analysis of the light curves of 48 B-type stars observed by Kepler is presented. Among these are 15 pulsating stars, all of which show low frequencies, characteristic of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars ... [more ▼]

The analysis of the light curves of 48 B-type stars observed by Kepler is presented. Among these are 15 pulsating stars, all of which show low frequencies, characteristic of slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars. Seven of these stars also show a few weak, isolated high frequencies and they could be considered as SPB/β Cephei (β Cep) hybrids. In all cases, the frequency spectra are quite different from what is seen from ground-based observations. We suggest that this is because most of the low frequencies are modes of high degree which are predicted to be unstable in models of mid-B stars. We find that there are non-pulsating stars within the β Cep and SPB instability strips. Apart from the pulsating stars, we can identify stars with frequency groupings similar to what is seen in Be stars but which are not Be stars. The origin of the groupings is not clear, but may be related to rotation. We find periodic variations in other stars which we attribute to proximity effects in binary systems or possibly rotational modulation. We find no evidence for pulsating stars between the cool edge of the SPB and the hot edge of the δ Sct instability strips. None of the stars shows the broad features which can be attributed to stochastically excited modes as recently proposed. Among our sample of B stars are two chemically peculiar stars, one of which is a HgMn star showing rotational modulation in the light curve. [less ▲]

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See detailGround-based follow-up in relation to Kepler asteroseismic investigation
Uytterhoeven, K.; Briquet, Maryline ULg; Bruntt, H. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous and high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all ... [more ▼]

The Kepler space mission, successfully launched in March 2009, is providing continuous and high-precision photometry of thousands of stars simultaneously. The uninterrupted time-series of stars of all known pulsation types are a precious source for asteroseismic studies. The Kepler data do not provide information on the physical parameters, such as T_eff, log g, metallicity, and v sin i, which are crucial for successful asteroseismic modelling. Additional ground-based time-series data are needed to characterize mode parameters in several types of pulsating stars. Therefore, ground-based multi-colour photometry and mid/high-resolution spectroscopy are needed to complement the space data. We present ground-based activities within KASC on selected asteroseismic Kepler targets of several pulsation types. Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope and William Herschel Telescope operated by the Isaac Newton Group, with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica), and with the Mercator telescope, operated by the Flemish Community, all on the island of La Palma at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC). Based on observations made with the IAC-80 operated on the island of Tenerife by the IAC at the Spanish Observatorio del Teide. Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Mártir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Mt. Wilson, Białków Observatory of the Wrocław University, Piszkésteto Mountain Station, and Observatoire de Haute Provence. Based on spectra taken at the Loiano (INAF - OA Bologna), Serra La Nave (INAF - OA Catania) and Asiago (INAF - OA Padova) observatories. Also based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC). We acknowledge with thanks the variable star observations from the AAVSO International Database contributed by observers worldwide and used in this research. Funding for the Kepler mission is provided by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. We thank the entire Kepler team for the development and operations of this outstanding mission. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards ensemble asteroseismology of the young open clusters χ Persei and NGC 6910
Saesen, S.; Pigulski, A.; Carrier, F. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

As a result of the variability survey in χ Persei and NGC 6910, the number of β Cep stars that are members of these two open clusters is increased to twenty stars, nine in NGC 6910 and eleven in χ Persei ... [more ▼]

As a result of the variability survey in χ Persei and NGC 6910, the number of β Cep stars that are members of these two open clusters is increased to twenty stars, nine in NGC 6910 and eleven in χ Persei. We compare pulsational properties, in particular the frequency spectra, of β Cep stars in both clusters and explain the differences in terms of the global parameters of the clusters. We also indicate that the more complicated pattern of the variability among B-type stars in χ Persei is very likely caused by higher rotational velocities of stars in this cluster. We conclude that the sample of pulsating stars in the two open clusters constitutes a very good starting point for the ensemble asteroseismology of β Cep-type stars and maybe also for other B-type pulsators. [less ▲]

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See detailPhotometric multi-site campaign on the open cluster NGC 884. I. Detection of the variable stars
Saesen, S.; Carrier, F.; Pigulski, A. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 515

Context. Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further ... [more ▼]

Context. Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physics in the stellar structure and evolution models of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. <BR /> Aims: To improve our comprehension of the β Cep stars, we studied the young open cluster NGC 884 to discover new B-type pulsators, besides the two known β Cep stars, and other variable stars. <BR /> Methods: An extensive multi-site campaign was set up to gather accurate CCD photometry time series in four filters (U, B, V, I) of a field of NGC 884. Fifteen different instruments collected almost 77 500 CCD images in 1286 h. The images were calibrated and reduced to transform the CCD frames into interpretable differential light curves. Various variability indicators and frequency analyses were applied to detect variable stars in the field. Absolute photometry was taken to deduce some general cluster and stellar properties. <BR /> Results: We achieved an accuracy for the brightest stars of 5.7 mmag in V, 6.9 mmag in B, 5.0 mmag in I and 5.3 mmag in U. The noise level in the amplitude spectra is 50 μmag in the V band. Our campaign confirms the previously known pulsators, and we report more than one hundred new multi- and mono-periodic B-, A- and F-type stars. Their interpretation in terms of classical instability domains is not straightforward, pointing to imperfections in theoretical instability computations. In addition, we have discovered six new eclipsing binaries and four candidates as well as other irregular variable stars in the observed field. The photometric data of the variable stars are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via <A href="http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/515/A16">http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/515/A16</A> [less ▲]

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See detailMOST reveals Spica as an Eclipsing Binary
Desmet, M.; Aerts, C.; Matthews, J. M. et al

in AIP Conference Proceedings (2009, September 01)

We present a unique observational study of Spica, a binary system with a primary component of the β Cephei type. We exploit simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopic observations and high-precision ... [more ▼]

We present a unique observational study of Spica, a binary system with a primary component of the β Cephei type. We exploit simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopic observations and high-precision photometry obtained by the MOST satellite. An important result is that the MOST photometry reveals Spica as an eclipsing binary contrary to what was quoted in the literature. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Optical Time Delay Estimate for the Double Gravitational Lens System B1600+434
Burud, I.; Hjorth, J.; Jaunsen, A. O. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2000), 544

We present optical I-band light curves of the gravitationally lensed double QSO B1600+434 from observations obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) between 1998 April and 1999 November. The ... [more ▼]

We present optical I-band light curves of the gravitationally lensed double QSO B1600+434 from observations obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) between 1998 April and 1999 November. The photometry has been performed by simultaneous deconvolution of all the data frames, involving a numerical lens galaxy model. Four methods have been applied to determine the time delay between the two QSO components, giving a mean estimate of Deltat=51+/-4 days (95% confidence level). This is the fourth optical time delay ever measured. Adopting a Omega=0.3, Lambda=0 universe and using the mass model of Maller et al., this time delay estimate yields a Hubble parameter of H[SUB]0[/SUB]=52[SUP]+14[/SUP][SUB]-8[/SUB] km s[SUP]-1[/SUP] Mpc[SUP]-1[/SUP] (95% confidence level), where the errors include time delay as well as model uncertainties. There are time-dependent offsets between the two (appropriately shifted) light curves that indicate the presence of external variations due to microlensing. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias. [less ▲]

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See detailRX J0911.4+0551: a complex quadruply imaged gravitationally lensed QSO.
Burud, I.; Courbin, F.; Lidman, C. et al

in The Messenger (1998), 92

The authors present their first observations of RX J0911.4+0551 at the 2.2-m ESO/MPI IRAC 2b in K-band which made them suspect that the QSO might be quadruple. This was confirmed on the optical data from ... [more ▼]

The authors present their first observations of RX J0911.4+0551 at the 2.2-m ESO/MPI IRAC 2b in K-band which made them suspect that the QSO might be quadruple. This was confirmed on the optical data from the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope, and on the NTT/SOFI data of the object. Careful deconvolution of the data allows to clearly resolve the object into four QSO components and a lensing galaxy. [less ▲]

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