References of "Zimmer, Jean-Yves"
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See detailStand structure of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in farms and establishment of a new potential vector of West Nile Virus for Belgium
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Simonon, Grégory ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 24)

Many Diptera, spread across the globe are likely to play a role in the transmission of various human and animal diseases. Mosquitoes in particular, give rise to various countries on research increasingly ... [more ▼]

Many Diptera, spread across the globe are likely to play a role in the transmission of various human and animal diseases. Mosquitoes in particular, give rise to various countries on research increasingly expanded and deepened. To better understand the structure of the Culicidae at cattle farms in Belgium and identify habitats favorable to the development of each species, a taxonomic inventory was conducted in 2008 and 2009 in ten different sites. They fall into five natural regions: Condroz, Ardenne, Fagne-Famenne, Lorraine and Compine. The collection of mosquitoes is based on sampling of larvae in 13 biotopes such as water troughs, tires, abandoned utensils and temporary puddles or not. The results of the morphotaxonomic study of the mosquitoes collected in the different study sites show the presence of five species of Culicidae divided into three genera, Anopheles, Culex and Culiseta. Of the 1843 individuals examined in 2009, Culex pipiens represents 79.98% of the total harvest. A new species is reported for Belgium, Culex modestus Ficalbi, 1890. This species is one of the most important from an epidemiological and medical-veterinary entomology, given its role in the transmission of West Nile and myxomatosis viruses. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding sites of Bluetongue virus vectors in Belgian cowshed
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

Conference (2011, April 13)

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See detailThe impact of naturally-occurring, trans-placental bluetongue virus serotype-8 infection on reproductive performance in sheep.
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Bolkaerts, Benoit; Baricalla, Christine et al

in Veterinary Journal (2011), 187(1), 72-80

Infection with bluetongue virus serotype (BTV)-8 occurred in ruminants in 2006 in Central-Western Europe. The trans-placental passage of this virus has been demonstrated in naturally- and experimentally ... [more ▼]

Infection with bluetongue virus serotype (BTV)-8 occurred in ruminants in 2006 in Central-Western Europe. The trans-placental passage of this virus has been demonstrated in naturally- and experimentally-infected cattle and in experimentally-infected sheep. Trans-placental transmission is potentially important in the 'over-wintering' of this virus and its subsequent impact on reproductive performance. This epidemiological study was carried out on a sheep flock in Belgium that had experienced a severe outbreak of BTV-8 infection, and where the seroprevalence had increased from 1.3% to 88% between January and November 2007. In total, 476 lambs and 26 aborted fetuses from 300 ewes, lambing at four distinct time periods, were investigated between November 2007 and May 2008. The following evidence suggested that BTV-8 infection occurred in utero: (1) positive PCR results from splenic tissue from aborted fetuses (n=4); (2) fetal malformations suggestive of BTV infection (n=10); (3) positive PCR results from red blood cells in-lambs (n=7), and (4) the presence of antibody at birth in viable lambs prior to the intake of colostrum (n=9). The evidence provided by this investigation strongly suggests that trans-placental BTV-8 infection occurs in naturally-infected sheep and the impact of infection on the reproductive performance of such a naive flock was considerable, with up to 25% of ewes aborting and with flock fertility reduced by 50%. The contribution of in utero-infected lambs to the over-wintering of BTV appears limited. [less ▲]

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See detailSurveillance des populations de phlébotomes (Diptera: Psychodidae), vecteurs des agents responsables des leishmanioses dans la région du M'Zab-Ghardaïa (Algérie)
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; Boubidi, Saïd; Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg et al

in Entomologie Faunistique = Faunistic Entomology (2011), 63(3), 97-101

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See detailBreeding sites of bluetongue virus vectors, Belgium
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(3), 575-576

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See detailBiting midges (Ceratopogonidae: Culicoïdes) in Belgium: a comparison between indoor and outdoor trapping in cattle and sheep farms.
Losson, Bertrand ULg; Robert, Nancy ULg; Paternostre, Julien ULg et al

Conference (2009, August)

Bluetongue, a vector born disease of ruminants, was identified for the first time in Northern Europe in 2006. The vectors are insects of the family Ceratopogonidae, genus Culicoides. In Belgium, no recent ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue, a vector born disease of ruminants, was identified for the first time in Northern Europe in 2006. The vectors are insects of the family Ceratopogonidae, genus Culicoides. In Belgium, no recent data were available about the biology of these insects including their feeding habits and behaviour. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the indoor and outdoor activity of these Diptera in 5 different cattle or sheep farms in 2008. Two sheep and 3 cattle farms were selected in the Province of Luxembourg, Belgium. In each farm 2 Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute (OVI) traps were installed respectively inside and outside the animal accommodation. Trapping was carried out twice a week from 17:00 until 24:00.The collecting vials were replaced every hour. A portable suction trap (BackTrap® U.S.A) was used twice on each visit to collect midges on the animals. In each farm the study was carried out for 6 successive weeks, 2 farms being monitored together. The study began on July 28th and ended on November 30th 2008. A total of 2591 culicoides were trapped. A majority of those (88.76%) were trapped indoors whereas 10.03% were trapped outdoors and 1.21% directly on the animals. The ambient temperature had a marked effect very few culicoides being trapped below 13°C. Three main species or species complex were identified both indoors and outdoors: C. obsoletus/scoticus, C. dewulfi, C. chiopterus. They represented 98.93% and 85.03% indoors and outdoors respectively. On the animals only C. obsoletus/scoticus and C. dewulfi were found. [less ▲]

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