References of "Zimmer, Jean-Yves"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLaboratory and semi-field environment tests for the control efficacy of Metarhizium anisopliae formulated with neem oil (suneem) against Anopheles gambiae s.l. adult emergence
Seye, Fawrou; Ndione, Raymond Demba; Touré, Mamour et al

in Academia Journal of Biotechnology (2013), 1(3), 46-52

Metarhizium anisopliae was evaluated previously in Suneem formulation against malaria vector adults. However, their ability to control aquatic stages is not yet evaluated. In laboratory conditions: the ... [more ▼]

Metarhizium anisopliae was evaluated previously in Suneem formulation against malaria vector adults. However, their ability to control aquatic stages is not yet evaluated. In laboratory conditions: the lethal dose (LD90) of the formulation was determined on Anopheles gambiae larvae collected from breeding sites and evaluated into artificial vats at dry and rainy seasons. In laboratory conditions, the LD90 was 5.3 × 106 spores/ml in 48 h. In semi-field environment, the formulation had a great emergence inhibition of mosquito adult (P < 0.0001). The emergences rate at day 8 were 2.25 ± 0.03, 28.00 ± 1.07 and 97.25 ± 1.56 % in dry season for the oil formulation (OF), Suneem (S), and water control respectively. In rainy season, the emergences were 1.25 ± 0.15, 30.25 ± 1.23 and 98 ± 0.76 % respectively. No significant difference was observed between dry and rainy seasons (P=0.3). Therefore, M. anisopliae formulated with Suneem may provide a more sustainable management strategy for malaria vectors control at larval stages. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (12 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChemical composition of silage residues sustaining the larval development of the Culicoides obsoletus/Culicoides scoticus species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2013), 191(1-2), 197-201

Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent emergence in northern ... [more ▼]

Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV). Bluetongue is a viral disease that affects domestic and wild ruminants. Since its recent emergence in northern Europe, this disease has caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industry. The biotopes, and more particularly the chemical characteristics which are suitable for larval development of the main vector species, are still relatively unknown. This study shows that the larvae of biting midges belonging to the species Culicoides obsoletus and Culicoides scoticus are able to breed in different types of silage residue (maize, grass, sugar beet pulp and their combinations). The chemical composition of substrates strongly influences the presence of the immature stages of these biting midges. Higher lignin and insoluble fibre contents seem to favour their presence and could play the role of a physical support for semi-aquatic larvae. In contrast, higher concentrations of magnesium and calcium are negatively correlated with the presence of these two species. These data will help to locate and monitor the breeding sites of these species and could contribute to the control of these insects on farms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (11 ULg)
Full Text
See detailCulicoides (Diptera : Ceratopogonidae) : important vectors of cattle diseases. Control assays in Belgium
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Poster (2012, October 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiversity and breeding sites of mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) potentially vectors of arboviruses in Belgian equestrian farms
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; De la Grandière de Noronha Cotta, Maria Ana ULg; Bawin, Thomas ULg et al

Poster (2012, October 08)

This study aims to determine the potential importance of the livestock farms, especially equestrian, to welcome and favor the proliferation of certain species of mosquito responsible for transmission of ... [more ▼]

This study aims to determine the potential importance of the livestock farms, especially equestrian, to welcome and favor the proliferation of certain species of mosquito responsible for transmission of arboviruses. The study of biodiversity of Culicidae in the horse farms in Belgium is carried out on species sampled at 64 biotopes in six stations study. Five surveys were realized during 2011 (June, July, August and October) and one in 2012 (June). The morphotaxonomic and molecular study of mosquitoes collected showed the presence of ten species: Culisata annulata Schrank, 1776; Anopheles claviger s.s. Meigen, 1804; An. maculipennis s.s. Meigen, 1818; An. messae Falleroni, 1926; Culex pipiens molestus Forskal, 1775; Cx. pipiens pipiens Linné, 1758; Cx. torrentium Martini, 1925; Cx. hortensis hortensis Ficalbi, 1889; Cx. territans Walker, 1856 and Coquillettidia richardii Ficalbi, 1889. Among the 24893 individuals examined in 2011, Cx. pipiens sl and Cx. torrentium represent 68.00% and 22.38% respectively of total harvest. These last species with Cs. annulata, are dominants and ubiquitous in all the horse farms visited. The species of the genus Anopheles have strong ecological requirements and are therefore associated with some special habitats; other species however have a strong ability to adapt and therefore attend a wide variety of biotopes (Cx. pipiens, Cx. torrentium and Cs. annulata). At the horse farms, water troughs and ponds are the most favorable habitats for larval development of Culicidae. The species potentially vectors of arboviruses that can cause problems in epidemiological equestrian farms are Cx. pipiens sl, Cx. torrentium and Cs. annulata. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (33 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLaboratory and field preliminary tests of Metarhizium anisopliae formulated with neem oil (Suneem) against Anopheles gambiae sl adult emergence
Seye, Fawrou; NDIONE, Raymond; Touré, Mamour et al

Poster (2012, October 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (10 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLaboratory and field preliminary tests of Metarhizium anisopliae formulated with neem oil (Suneem) against Anopheles gambiae sl adult emergence
Seye, Fawrou; Ndione, Raymond; Touré, Mamour et al

Poster (2012, October 08)

Metarhizium anisopliae have shown great potential for the control of malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors with conidial formulation is need. In ... [more ▼]

Metarhizium anisopliae have shown great potential for the control of malaria vectors. However, their ability to control aquatic stages of anopheline vectors with conidial formulation is need. In laboratory condition (25°C and 76%RH), we formulated M. anisopliae with emulsifian neem oil (Suneem 1%) before application on An. gambiae larvae at 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 % (v/v) to determine the LD90. We applied in semi-field environment, the LD90 of the formulation into artificial vats on the Anopheles gambiae sl larvae collected from many breeding sites at dry and rain seasons. In laboratory condition, the LD 50 was 4.4 x 10^6 spores/ml and the LD90 was not obtained 24 after exposure. The probite line equation was Y=1.61 x – 0.55 and R²= 0.9793. The LD 50 was 3.1 x 10^6 and the LD90 was 5.3 X 10^6 spores/ml 48 h after exposure. The probite line equation was then Y= 1.69 x + 1.79 and R²= 0.9757. Microscope magnifying revealed also the fungal attack via cuticle and mycelia germination one dead larvae and pupae. In semi-field environment, treatment revealed that, at 5.3 x 10^6 spores/ml, the formulation has a great emergence inhibition of mosquito adult formation. No significant difference was observed between dry and rain season application of M. anisopliae on the larvae. Therefore, a combination of M. anisopliae with Suneem may provide a more sustainable management strategy for malaria vectors control at the larval stages. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (16 ULg)
See detailLivestock farms in Belgium shelter they the mosquitoes (Diptera, Culicidae) potentially vectors of arboviruses?
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Simonon, Grégory et al

Poster (2012, August 23)

Although no major arbovirus which mosquitoes are responsible for its transmission has been recorded in Belgium in recent decades, environment and climate change, current and future, could favor the ... [more ▼]

Although no major arbovirus which mosquitoes are responsible for its transmission has been recorded in Belgium in recent decades, environment and climate change, current and future, could favor the emergence of vector-borne diseases in the country, by inducing changes on Culicidae populations. This study aims to determine the potential importance of agricultural environments, and especially livestock farms, to welcome and favor the proliferation of certain species of mosquito responsible for transmission of arboviruses. A taxonomic inventory was conducted in 2008 (III, VI and X) and 2009 (V and IX) in ten cattle farms, and in 2010 (X) in ten stables located in Belgium. The harvest of mosquitoes is based on larval sampling at the level of 14 biotopes such as water troughs, used tires, abandoned utensils and temporary puddles or not. The morphotaxonomic study of larvae and genitalia has allowed to identify eight species in 18 study stations. These are Anopheles claviger Meigen, 1804 ; A. maculipennis s.l. Meigen, 1818 ; Culiseta annulata Schrank, 1776 ; Cs. morsitans Theobald, 1901 ; Culex modestus Ficalbi, 1889 ; Cx. torrentium Martini, 1925 ; Cx. territans Walker, 1856 and Cx. pipiens s.l. L., 1758. Of the 1843 individuals examined in 2009, Cx. pipiens s.l. represents 79.98% of the total harvest; however, Cx. modestus represents only 0.92%. Used tires form the most favorable habitat for larval development of Culicidae. Therefore, despite the low diversity of mosquito observed within the livestock environments, they represent a significant risk for the reproduction of some potential vectors of arboviruses. In addition, some larval habitats constitute very favorable sites for proliferation of mosquito, causing a real problem of nuisance for animals of farms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBreeding sites of main Bluetongue virus vectors in Belgian cowshed
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

Poster (2012, August)

Bluetongue (BT) is an emerging vectorborne disease of ruminants that was reported in August 2006 in northern Europe. Since 2007, BT virus (BTV) serotype 8 continued its spread across Europe and caused ... [more ▼]

Bluetongue (BT) is an emerging vectorborne disease of ruminants that was reported in August 2006 in northern Europe. Since 2007, BT virus (BTV) serotype 8 continued its spread across Europe and caused considerable economic losses. This observation indicates possible overwintering of the vector from year to year. The biological vectors of BTV are biting midges of the genus Culicoides. Breeding sites of bluetongue vector species have been found near farms (e.g. silage residues) and in neighboring meadows (e.g. cattle dung) but never inside sheds. We conducted a study in five cattle farms in Belgium during February–October 2008. Three samplings were performed and each soil sample collected inside cowsheds was incubated to enable adult midges to emerge. Among 15 soil biotopes sampled, only one showed the emergence of adult Culicoides biting midges: dried dung adhering to walls inside animal enclosures and resulting to the partial removal of used animal litter. It was a breeding site for the C. obsoletus/C. scoticus complex. Physico-chemical characteristics showed that midges of this complex are more prevalent in soil samples with a high carbon:nitrogen (C:N) index. So Culicoides biting midges are able to complete their life cycle in animal enclosures. We identified a breeding site for the primary BTV vector in a cowshed in northern Europe. These observations could explain the persistence of BTV from year to year despite fairly harsh winters. Hygienic measures on farms could reduce biting midges populations and so improve efficacy of vaccination campaigns against BT in Europe. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLes Culicoides, importants vecteurs de maladies du bétail
Smeets, François ULg; Robert, Nancy; Simonon, Grégory et al

Diverse speeche and writing (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (7 ULg)
See detailStand structure of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in farms and establishment of a new potential vector of West Nile Virus for Belgium
Boukraa, Slimane ULg; Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Simonon, Grégory ULg et al

Poster (2011, May 24)

Many Diptera, spread across the globe are likely to play a role in the transmission of various human and animal diseases. Mosquitoes in particular, give rise to various countries on research increasingly ... [more ▼]

Many Diptera, spread across the globe are likely to play a role in the transmission of various human and animal diseases. Mosquitoes in particular, give rise to various countries on research increasingly expanded and deepened. To better understand the structure of the Culicidae at cattle farms in Belgium and identify habitats favorable to the development of each species, a taxonomic inventory was conducted in 2008 and 2009 in ten different sites. They fall into five natural regions: Condroz, Ardenne, Fagne-Famenne, Lorraine and Compine. The collection of mosquitoes is based on sampling of larvae in 13 biotopes such as water troughs, tires, abandoned utensils and temporary puddles or not. The results of the morphotaxonomic study of the mosquitoes collected in the different study sites show the presence of five species of Culicidae divided into three genera, Anopheles, Culex and Culiseta. Of the 1843 individuals examined in 2009, Culex pipiens represents 79.98% of the total harvest. A new species is reported for Belgium, Culex modestus Ficalbi, 1890. This species is one of the most important from an epidemiological and medical-veterinary entomology, given its role in the transmission of West Nile and myxomatosis viruses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (21 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBreeding sites of Bluetongue virus vectors in Belgian cowshed
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

Conference (2011, April 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (6 ULg)