References of "Wheatley, P. J."
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See detailAn orbital period of 0.94days for the hot-Jupiter planet WASP-18b
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Cameron, A Collier et al

in Nature (2009), 460

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which ... [more ▼]

The `hot Jupiters' that abound in lists of known extrasolar planets are thought to have formed far from their host stars, but migrate inwards through interactions with the proto-planetary disk from which they were born, or by an alternative mechanism such as planet-planet scattering. The hot Jupiters closest to their parent stars, at orbital distances of only ~0.02 astronomical units, have strong tidal interactions, and systems such as OGLE-TR-56 have been suggested as tests of tidal dissipation theory. Here we report the discovery of planet WASP-18b with an orbital period of 0.94days and a mass of ten Jupiter masses (10M[SUB]Jup[/SUB]), resulting in a tidal interaction an order of magnitude stronger than that of planet OGLE-TR-56b. Under the assumption that the tidal-dissipation parameter Q of the host star is of the order of 10[SUP]6[/SUP], as measured for Solar System bodies and binary stars and as often applied to extrasolar planets, WASP-18b will be spiralling inwards on a timescale less than a thousandth that of the lifetime of its host star. Therefore either WASP-18 is in a rare, exceptionally short-lived state, or the tidal dissipation in this system (and possibly other hot-Jupiter systems) must be much weaker than in the Solar System. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and characterization of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting a solar-type star
Gillon, Michaël ULg; Anderson, D. R.; Triaud, A H M J et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2009), 501

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-6b, an inflated sub-Jupiter mass planet transiting every 3.3610060[SUP]+ 0.0000022 [/SUP][SUB]- 0.0000035 [/SUB] days a mildly metal-poor solar-type star of magnitude V = 11.9. A combined analysis of the WASP photometry, high-precision followup transit photometry and radial velocities yield a planetary mass M[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.503[SUP]+0.019[/SUP][SUB]-0.038[/SUB] M[SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R[SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.224[SUP]+0.051[/SUP][SUB]-0.052[/SUB] R_J, resulting in a density rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.27 ± 0.05 rho_J. The mass and radius for the host star are M_ast = 0.88[SUP]+0.05[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M_o and R_ast = 0.870[SUP]+0.025[/SUP][SUB]-0.036[/SUB] R_o. The non-zero orbital eccentricity e = 0.054^+0.018[SUB]-0.015[/SUB] that we measure suggests that the planet underwent a massive tidal heating 1 Gyr ago that could have contributed to its inflated radius. High-precision radial velocities obtained during a transit allow us to measure a sky-projected angle between the stellar spin and orbital axis beta = 11[SUP]+14[/SUP][SUB]-18[/SUB] deg. In addition to similar published measurements, this result favors a dominant migration mechanism based on tidal interactions with a protoplanetary disk. Based on data collected with the HARPS spectrograph at ESO La Silla Observatory in the programs 082.C-0040(E) and 082.C-0608. The photometric time-series and radial velocities (Tables 4, 5) used in this work are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/501/785 [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-precision photometry by telescope defocusing - I. The transiting planetary system WASP-5
Southworth, John; Hinse, T. C.; Jørgensen, U. G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2009), 396

We present high-precision photometry of two transit events of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-5, obtained with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at European Southern Obseratory La Silla. In order to ... [more ▼]

We present high-precision photometry of two transit events of the extrasolar planetary system WASP-5, obtained with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at European Southern Obseratory La Silla. In order to minimize both random and flat-fielding errors, we defocused the telescope so its point spread function approximated an annulus of diameter 40 pixel (16 arcsec). Data reduction was undertaken using standard aperture photometry plus an algorithm for optimally combining the ensemble of comparison stars. The resulting light curves have point-to-point scatters of 0.50mmag for the first transit and 0.59mmag for the second. We construct detailed signal-to-noise ratio calculations for defocused photometry, and apply them to our observations. We model the light curves with the JKTEBOP code and combine the results with tabulated predictions from theoretical stellar evolutionary models to derive the physical properties of the WASP-5 system. We find that the planet has a mass of M[SUB]b[/SUB] = 1.637 +/- 0.075 +/- 0.033M[SUB]Jup[/SUB], a radius of R[SUB]b[/SUB] = 1.171 +/- 0.056 +/- 0.012R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], a large surface gravity of g[SUB]b[/SUB] = 29.6 +/- 2.8ms[SUP]-2[/SUP] and a density of rho[SUB]b[/SUB] = 1.02 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.01rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (statistical and systematic uncertainties). The planet's high equilibrium temperature of T[SUB]eq[/SUB] = 1732 +/- 80K makes it a good candidate for detecting secondary eclipses. Based on data collected by Microlensing Network for the Detection of Small Terrestrial Exoplanets (MiNDSTEp) with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. E-mail: j.k.taylor@warwick.ac.uk â ¡ Royal Society University Research Fellow. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Low Density Transiting Exoplanet WASP-15b
West, R. G.; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2009), 137

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of a low-density exoplanet transiting an 11th magnitude star in the Southern hemisphere. WASP-15b, which orbits its host star with a period P = 3.7520656 ± 0.0000028 d, has a mass M [SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.542 ± 0.050 M [SUB]J[/SUB] and radius R [SUB]p[/SUB] = 1.428 ± 0.077 R [SUB]J[/SUB], and is therefore one of the least dense transiting exoplanets so far discovered (rho[SUB]p[/SUB] = 0.247 ± 0.035 g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). An analysis of the spectrum of the host star shows it to be of spectral type around F5, with an effective temperature T [SUB]eff[/SUB] = 6300 ± 100 K and [Fe/H] = --0.17 ± 0.11. [less ▲]

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See detailWasp-7: A Bright Transiting-Exoplanet System in the Southern Hemisphere
Hellier, Coel; Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2009), 690

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest ... [more ▼]

We report that a Jupiter-mass planet, WASP-7b, transits the V = 9.5 star HD 197286 every 4.95 d. This is the brightest discovery from the WASP-South transit survey so far and is currently the brightest transiting-exoplanet system in the southern hemisphere. WASP-7b is among the densest of the known Jupiter-mass planets, suggesting that it has a massive core. The planet mass is 0.96[SUP]+0.12[/SUP] [SUB]--0.18[/SUB] M [SUB]Jup[/SUB], the radius is 0.915[SUP]+0.046[/SUP] [SUB]--0.040[/SUB] R [SUB]Jup[/SUB], and the density is 1.26[SUP]+0.25[/SUP] [SUB]--0.21[/SUB] rho[SUB]Jup[/SUB] (1.67[SUP]+0.33[/SUP] [SUB]--0.28[/SUB] g cm[SUP]--3[/SUP]). [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-5b: a dense, very hot Jupiter transiting a 12th-mag Southern-hemisphere star
Anderson, D. R.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2008), 387

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-5b, a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting a 12th-mag G-type star in the Southern hemisphere. The 1.6-d orbital period places WASP-5b in the class of very hot Jupiters and leads to a predicted equilibrium temperature of 1750K. WASP-5b is the densest of any known Jovian-mass planet, being a factor of 7 denser than TrES-4, which is subject to similar stellar insolation, and a factor of 3 denser than WASP-4b, which has a similar orbital period. We present transit photometry and radial velocity measurements of WASP-5 (= USNO-B10487-0799749), from which we derive the mass, radius and density of the planet: M[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.58[SUP]+0.13[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB]M[SUB]J[/SUB],R[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.090[SUP]+0.094[/SUP][SUB]-0.058[/SUB]R[SUB]J[/SUB] and rho[SUB]P[/SUB] = 1.22[SUP]+0.19[/SUP][SUB]-0.24[/SUB]rho[SUB]J[/SUB]. The orbital period is P = 1.6284296[SUP]+0.0000048[/SUP][SUB]-0.0000037[/SUB]d and the mid-transit epoch is T[SUB]C[/SUB](HJD) = 2454375.62466[SUP]+0.00026[/SUP][SUB]-0.00025[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-4b: A 12th Magnitude Transiting Hot Jupiter in the Southern Hemisphere
Wilson, D. M.; Gillon, Michaël ULg; Hellier, C. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2008), 675

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE ... [more ▼]

We report the discovery of WASP-4b, a large transiting gas-giant planet with an orbital period of 1.34 days. This is the first planet to be discovered by the SuperWASP-South observatory and CORALIE collaboration and the first planet orbiting a star brighter than 16th magnitude to be discovered in the southern hemisphere. A simultaneous fit to high-quality light curves and precision radial velocity measurements leads to a planetary mass of 1.22[SUP]+0.09[/SUP][SUB]-0.08[/SUB] M[SUB]Jup[/SUB] and a planetary radius of 1.42[SUP]+0.07[/SUP][SUB]-0.04[/SUB] R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. The host star is USNO-B1.0 0479-0948995, a G7 V star of visual magnitude 12.5. As a result of the short orbital period, the predicted surface temperature of the planet is 1761 K, making it an ideal candidate for detections of the secondary eclipse at infrared wavelengths. [less ▲]

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See detailWASP-1b and WASP-2b: two new transiting exoplanets detected with SuperWASP and SOPHIE
Cameron, A Collier; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G. et al

in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2007), 375

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified ... [more ▼]

We have detected low-amplitude radial-velocity variations in two stars, USNO-B1.0 1219-0005465 (GSC 02265-00107 = WASP-1) and USNO-B1.0 0964-0543604 (GSC 00522-01199 = WASP-2). Both stars were identified as being likely host stars of transiting exoplanets in the 2004 SuperWASP wide-field transit survey. Using the newly commissioned radial-velocity spectrograph SOPHIE at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence, we found that both objects exhibit reflex orbital radial-velocity variations with amplitudes characteristic of planetary-mass companions and in-phase with the photometric orbits. Line-bisector studies rule out faint blended binaries as the cause of either the radial-velocity variations or the transits. We perform preliminary spectral analyses of the host stars, which together with their radial-velocity variations and fits to the transit light curves yield estimates of the planetary masses and radii. WASP-1b and WASP-2b have orbital periods of 2.52 and 2.15 d, respectively. Given mass estimates for their F7V and K1V primaries, we derive planet masses 0.80-0.98 and 0.81-0.95 times that of Jupiter, respectively. WASP-1b appears to have an inflated radius of at least 1.33 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB], whereas WASP-2b has a radius in the range 0.65-1.26 R[SUB]Jup[/SUB]. [less ▲]

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