References of "Verheggen, François"
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See detailTuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) development on wild and cultivated plant species
Bawin, Thomas ULg; Dujeu, David ULg; Fagan, Maud et al

Conference (2015, August 24)

Introduction: The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread invasive species damaging economically important solanaceous crop plants, including tomatoes and potatoes ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread invasive species damaging economically important solanaceous crop plants, including tomatoes and potatoes. Little is known about the ability of the microlepidoptera to encounter and develop on alternative wild and agricultural plant species. These plants could provide refuges and have to be identified for more efficient integrated management strategies. Objectives: In the present study, we assessed under laboratory conditions the ability of T. absoluta to develop on such plant species referred as potential hosts in the literature, including Solanaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Fabaceae, and Malvaceae. Materials and methods: For each plant species, fitness tests were performed in Petri dishes by isolating single individuals with excised leaf. Two choice behavioral assays were performed in flying tunnels. Volatile organic compounds released by solanaceous plants were trapped using a dynamic collection system, and analyzed by GC-MS. Results: We found that Solanum species allowed higher larval survivability and shorter development time (from egg to adult emergency) compared to the other plants. Non-solanaceous plants were not able to sustain T. absoluta larvae. Two choice behavioral assays revealed that adult distribution and female oviposition did not differ between Solanum species, which were preferred to other tested solanaceous plants. The hypothesis that female host plant choice is influenced by plant volatile organic compounds was tested. Solanum volatile profiles showed similarities, and were presenting quantitative and qualitative differences with the other tested solanaceous plants, providing some explanations in the observed behavioral discrimination. Further electrophysiological and behavioral assays are required to confirm the effect of specific chemicals on the choice of the oviposition site in T. absoluta. Conclusion: It can be concluded that Solanum species are the more suitable hosts for T. absoluta development. Other solanaceous plant species could be opportunistically colonized with little incidence but care should be taken in these results as genetic variability in insects and plants, as well as plant physiological state, might have an impact on the pest survivability. [less ▲]

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See detailDoes elevation in atmospheric CO2 concentration impact aphid alarm signaling?
Boullis, Antoine ULg; Appeldoorn, Claire; Oostrom, Marjolein et al

Poster (2015, August 24)

The effect of global atmospheric changes on interactions between vegetation and phytophagous insects is well studied since several years, but how does these changes affect the interactions between ... [more ▼]

The effect of global atmospheric changes on interactions between vegetation and phytophagous insects is well studied since several years, but how does these changes affect the interactions between herbivore insects and their natural enemies is less clear. Impact of an increase in CO2 concentration on aphids is also well documented, but few publications focused on their chemical ecology. When endegered, aphids emit an alarm pheromone (generally composed of only one molecule: (E)-Beta-Farnesene) to induce an escape behavior in the colony. Here, we studied how an increase in CO2 concentration affects the alarm signaling mechanisms of the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, focusing on the production, the emission (under attack) and the perception of this signal. [less ▲]

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See detailCould alternative solanaceous hosts act as refuges for the tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta?
Bawin, Thomas ULg; Dujeu, David ULg; De Backer, Lara ULg et al

in Arthropod-Plant Interactions (2015), 9(4), 425-435

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread devastating pest reported to develop on economically important solanaceous plants. The characterization of its effective ... [more ▼]

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread devastating pest reported to develop on economically important solanaceous plants. The characterization of its effective host range could help to understand and prevent the dispersion behavior of the insect in the environment. In this study, the ability of T. absoluta to locate and develop on wild (Solanum nigrum, Atropa belladonna, Datura stramonium) and cultivated (Solanum tuberosum) solanaceous plant species under laboratory conditions was assessed. Dual-choice behavioral assays performed in flying tunnels (S. tuberosum versus another plant) revealed that adult distribution and female oviposition did not differ between Solanum species, which were preferred to the other tested plants. The volatile molecules released by each tested plant species provide some explanations in the observed behavioral discrimination: S. nigrum and S. tuberosum volatile profiles were similar, and were presenting quantitative and qualitative differences with the other tested Solanaceous plants. To determine whether the host plant choice was adaptive or not, we have finally conducted fitness assays, by rearing T. absoluta larvae on each plant species and have shown that Solanum species allowed higher larval survivability and lower development time (from egg to adult emergency) compared to the other plants. We conclude that Solanum species are suitable host plants for T. absoluta, but other Solanaceous plant species could be opportunistically colonized with fewer incidences. [less ▲]

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See detailVolatile organic compounds emitted by Cavendish and Plantain banana plants
De Clerck, Caroline ULg; Kherkhofs, Celine; Berhal, Chadi ULg et al

Poster (2015, May 19)

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See detailTuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) development on wild and cultivated plant species
Bawin, Thomas ULg; Dujeu, David ULg; Fagan, Maud ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 19)

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread invasive species damaging economically important cultivated solanaceous crop plants, including tomatoes and potatoes. Little ... [more ▼]

The tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is a widespread invasive species damaging economically important cultivated solanaceous crop plants, including tomatoes and potatoes. Little is known about the ability of this microlepidoptera to encounter and develop on alternative wild and agricultural plant species. These plants could provide refuges and have to be identified for more efficient integrated management strategies. In the present study, we assessed under laboratory conditions the ability of T. absoluta to develop on such plant species referred as potential hosts in the literature, including Solanaceae, Chenopodiaceae, Convolvulaceae, Fabaceae, and Malvaceae. For each plant species, fitness tests were performed in Petri dishes by isolating single individuals with excised leaf. We found that Solanum species allowed higher larval survivability and shorter development time (from egg to adult emergency) compared to the other plants. Non-solanaceous plants were not able to sustain T. absoluta larvae. Two choice behavioral assays performed in flying tunnels revealed that adult distribution and female oviposition did not differ between Solanum species, which were preferred to other tested solanaceous plants. These results appeared to be consistent with survival rates and development times. Because larval survivability depends on the female’s oviposition choice, the hypothesis that host plant choice is influenced by plant volatile organic compounds has to be tested. Volatile organic compounds released by solanaceous plants were trapped using a dynamic collection system, and analyzed by GC-MS. Solanum volatile profiles showed similarities, and were presenting quantitative and qualitative differences with the other tested solanaceous plants, providing some explanations in the observed behavioral discrimination. Further electrophysiological and behavioral assays are required to confirm the effect of specific chemicals on the choice of the oviposition site in T. absoluta. It can be concluded that Solanum species are the more suitable hosts for T. absoluta development. Other solanaceous plant species could be opportunistically colonized with little incidence but care should be taken in these results as genetic variability in insects and plants, as well as plant physiological state, might have an impact on the pest survivability. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficiency of pheromone-based formulations against phytophagous pests
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 19)

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or ... [more ▼]

Innovative integrated pest management methods are needed to overcome market withdrawal of synthetic pesticides. Therefore, the identification of environment-friendly bio-products carrying direct or indirect biocide activity is one promising alternative option. Our researches focus on the identification of appropriate formulations releasing volatile organic compounds that are attractant for natural enemies of insect pests. However, the elaboration of slow-release devices that ensure stable and controlled release of active volatile compounds is quite challenging. Here, we developed a formulation based on E-β-farnesene and (-)-β-caryophyllene, these two semiochemicals having strong attractive potential on aphid natural enemies including lady beetles and hoverflies. Both compounds were encapsulated together in alginate gel beads. The blend efficiency was first evaluated through laboratory assays, and then in wheat and broad bean fields, by considering the abundance and diversity of aphids and their natural enemies. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat makes the invasive Harmonia axyridis so successful? Six years of research in Gembloux provide additional answers
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg; Vandereycken, Axel ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 14)

Following the introduction of the invasive species Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) in Europe, many research works were conducted on its ecological, economic and social impacts. Recently, our team has been ... [more ▼]

Following the introduction of the invasive species Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) in Europe, many research works were conducted on its ecological, economic and social impacts. Recently, our team has been involved in the characterization of the behavioral traits making this lady beetle species so successful. The main conclusions of two PhD works will be shortly presented: (1) Through a six-year inventory performed in Belgian agroecosystems, we have demonstrated that H. axyridis has become well established and was among the most abundant aphidophagous predatory species, causing a severe depression of biodiversity, even if communities of aphid predators are still quite diversified. (2) The social issues associated with the establishment of overwintering aggregations in human constructions were also carefully investigated. We have demonstrated the importance of social interactions on the establishment and cohesion of the aggregates. Finally, we have demonstrated that the deposition of a set of saturated and non-saturated hydrocarbons on the surfaces where the lady beetles were settling on, allowed their conspecifics to follow their markings and join the group. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst evidence of a volatile sex pheromone in Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Fischer, Christophe ULg; Durieux, Delphine ULg et al

Conference (2015, May 13)

To date, volatile sex pheromones have not been identified in the Coccinellidae family; yet, various studies have suggested that such semiochemicals exist. Here, we collected volatile chemicals released by ... [more ▼]

To date, volatile sex pheromones have not been identified in the Coccinellidae family; yet, various studies have suggested that such semiochemicals exist. Here, we collected volatile chemicals released by virgin females of the multicolored Asian lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), which were either allowed or not allowed to feed on aphids. Virgin females in the presence of aphids, exhibited “calling behavior”, which is commonly associated with the emission of a sex pheromone in several Coleoptera species. These calling females were found to release a blend of volatile compounds that is involved in the remote attraction (i.e., from a distance) of males. Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses revealed that (–)-β-caryophyllene was the major constituent of the volatile blend (ranging from 80 to 86%), with four other chemical components also being present; β-elemene, methyl-eugenol, α-humulene, and α-bulnesene. In a second set of experiments, the emission of the five constituents identified from the blend was quantified daily over a 9-day period after exposure to aphids. We found that the quantity of all five chemicals significantly increased across the experimental period. Finally, we evaluated the activity of a synthetic blend of these chemicals by performing bioassays which demonstrated the same attractive effect in males only. The results confirm that female H. axyridis produce a volatile sex pheromone. These findings have potential in the development of more specific and efficient biological pest-control management methods aimed at manipulating the behavior of this invasive lady beetle. [less ▲]

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See detail10. Perspectives - 1. La Lutte contre les pucerons grâce aux odeurs: développement d'une formulation phéromonale
Fassotte, Bérénice ULg; Vandereycken, Axel ULg; Chevalier Mendes Lopes, Thomas ULg et al

in Watillon, Bernard; Bodson, Bernard (Eds.) Livre Blanc Céréales (2015, February 25)

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See detailBacteria may enhance species association in an ant-aphid mutualistic relationship
Fischer, Christophe ULg; Lognay, Georges ULg; Detrain, Claire et al

in Chemoecology (2015)

The mutualistic relationships between certain ant and aphid species are well known, the primary benefits being protection for the aphids and carbohydrate-rich honeydew for the ants. Questions remain ... [more ▼]

The mutualistic relationships between certain ant and aphid species are well known, the primary benefits being protection for the aphids and carbohydrate-rich honeydew for the ants. Questions remain, however, as to the exact semiochemical factors that establish and maintain such relationships. In this study we used a series of treatments and associated controls placed at the end of a two-way olfactometer to determine the degree of attractiveness of a complete plant-aphid-honeydew system as well as individual components of that system. Both the olfactometer branch selected by the black garden ant (Lasius niger), and the linear speed with which ants moved through the device, were measured. Study results showed that ants were attracted not just to the complete plant system and the honeydew itself, but also to the microbial flora in the absence of plant or honeydew, and specifically to a bacterium from the black bean aphid (Aphis fabae) honeydew, Staphylococcus xylosus. This bacterium produces a blend of semiochemicals that attract the ant scouts. This information suggests the presence of a naturally-occurring, reliable biotic cue for detection of potential aphid partners. This would have to be confirmed in natural conditions by further field experiments. Rather than being opportunistic species that coincidentally colonize a sugar-rich environment, microorganisms living in aphid honeydew may be able to alter emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thus significantly mediating partner attraction. A bacterial involvement in this mutualistic relationship could alter the manner in which these and similar relationships are viewed and evaluated. Future studies into mutualism stability and function among macroscopic partners will likely need to transition from a two-partner perspective to a multiple-partner perspective, and consider the microbial component, with the potential for one or more taxa making significant contributions to the relationship [less ▲]

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See detailLes vers à soie sauvages à Madagascar : Enjeux écologiques et socio-économiques
Verheggen, François ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg; Bogaert, Jan ULg

in Entomologie Faunistique = Faunistic Entomology (2015), 68

We here introduce the book « The Malagasy silk moths: ecological and socio-economic challenges » published in 2013 by the Presses agronomiques de Gembloux (Belgium). This book reflects the achievements ... [more ▼]

We here introduce the book « The Malagasy silk moths: ecological and socio-economic challenges » published in 2013 by the Presses agronomiques de Gembloux (Belgium). This book reflects the achievements and scientific activities of the project "Sustainable Management and valorisation of the endemic silkworm Borocera cajani in forest areas in the Antananarivo region" funded by Commission universitaire pour le Développement (CUD - CIUF). [less ▲]

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See detailOrientation behaviour of Culicoides obsoletus (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a relevant virus vector in northern Europe, toward host-associated odorant cues
Zimmer, Jean-Yves; Verheggen, François ULg; Haubruge, Eric ULg et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2015), 211

Some Culicoides biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have recently been associated with outbreaks of important epizootic diseases such as bluetongue ... [more ▼]

Some Culicoides biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are biological virus vectors worldwide and have recently been associated with outbreaks of important epizootic diseases such as bluetongue and Schmallenberg in northern Europe. These diseases, which affect domestic and wild ruminants, have caused considerable economic losses. Knowledge of host preferences of these biting midges – especially of the relevant vectors of arboviruses near farms, such as Culicoides obsoletus in northern Europe – is essential to understand pathogen transmission cycles and the epidemiology of associated diseases. This study aimed to determine host preferences of C. obsoletus using an in-field flight tunnel containing pairs of calf, sheep, chicken, and human hosts (and controls) and a laboratory two-choice bioassay containing volatile extracts of host skin (and controls). Behavioural responses of nulliparous C. obsoletus females in the in-field flight tunnel showed a preference for human (but also calf and sheep) hosts, probably due to their exhalation of greater quantities of carbon dioxide. The laboratory experiment revealed that volatile organic compounds released from the skin of chicken and sheep seemed to attract this species. Culicoides obsoletus, thus, seems to have a wide host range and to be particularly attracted by humans under field conditions. A better understanding of vector–host interaction could enable the development of control strategies against adult biting midges, by exploiting insect-repelling or -attractive semiochemicals. Volatile extracts of chicken and/or sheep skin could be used to identify volatile compounds attractive to C. obsoletus, which in turn could be used in baited traps. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic and impact of major insect pests on Jatropha curcas L. in two cropping systems with contrasting characteristics in the province of Kinshasa (DRC)
Minengu, Jean de Dieu; Verheggen, François ULg; Mergeai, Guy ULg

in Tropicultura (2015), 3

The dynamic and impact of the major insect pests on Jatropha curcas L. were studied on two plantations located in the province of Kinshasa, the first in pure stand without irrigation (Mbankana site), the ... [more ▼]

The dynamic and impact of the major insect pests on Jatropha curcas L. were studied on two plantations located in the province of Kinshasa, the first in pure stand without irrigation (Mbankana site), the second under irrigation in combination with other crops (N'sele site). In Mbankana, after being planted during the long rainy season (October - December), the plants suffer significant attacks by crickets Brachytrupes membranaceus Drury (Orthoptera, Gryllidae), which cause a mortality rate of 10 - 40%. The first half of October and second half of December are the best planting periods when it comes to limiting these losses. At N'sele, cricket attacks during planting are controlled by the farmers who eat these insects. After being planted at both sites, the plants are attacked by leaf miner caterpillars Stomphastis thraustica Meyrick (Lepidoptera, Gracillariidae) and flea beetles Aphthona sp. (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), which consume the leaf blades and buds. The size of these two pest populations and resulting damage reach a peak during the wettest time of year. On adult plants at N'sele, insect pests observed include flea beetles, leaf miners, and shield-backed bugs Calidea sp. (Heteroptera, Scutelleridae). These bugs cause damage to flowers and capsules. In the absence of insecticide treatments, yield losses reached 90% in Mbankana and 60% in N'sele. The discussion focuses on what causes the different pest impact levels recorded between the cropping systems and methods used to limit the main types of damage caused by insects on J. curcas in the Kinshasa region. [less ▲]

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See detailSemiochemicals of Rhagoletis Fruit Flies: Potential for Integrated Pest Management
Sarles, Landry ULg; Verhaeghe, Agnès; Francis, Frédéric ULg et al

in Crop Protection (2015)

Worldwide economic losses associated with Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) require an effective means of control. Most conventional insecticides used to control fruit flies have been banned ... [more ▼]

Worldwide economic losses associated with Rhagoletis fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) require an effective means of control. Most conventional insecticides used to control fruit flies have been banned, and fruit producers are seeking new economical fruit fly control options. Bait stations can be a suitable alternative, provided they are affordable, effective and pest-specific. Semiochemicals are important for fruit flies to locate their host fruit and to reproduce. They could therefore be good candidates to improve existing bait stations. In this literature review, we summarize the available data on Rhagoletis semiochemicals, including the pheromones and allelochemicals used for host location. Then, we present some field applications of semiochemicals that have been successful at Rhagoletis fly control and discuss potential semiochemical-based control strategies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (5 ULg)