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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2014)

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives:Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods:Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5;20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memorytask in 13successivefMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results:We tested for a group (PER3 5/5>PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the first evening WMZ(i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative toPER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responsesin the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions:These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences wereobserved in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep loss changes executive brain responses in the wake maintenance zone
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

in Journal of Sleep Research (2014), 23(1), 61

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Brain mechanisms underlying executive processes are regulated by circadian and sleep homeostatic processes. Furthermore, during sleep deprivation (SD), cognitive performance and neural responses are differentially modulated by a clock gene PERIOD3 polymorphism. Here, we investigated interindividual differences on executive brain responses under SD. Critically, we focused on the circadian evening wake maintenance zone (WMZ), a key time-point for sleep-wake regulation. Methods: Thirty healthy young volunteers, genotyped for the PER3 polymorphism (10 PER3 5/5; 20 PER3 4/4 homozygotes), underwent 42-h SD under constant routine conditions. They performed a 3-back working memory task in 13 successive fMRI sessions. To compare neural activity in the WMZ before and during SD, sessions were realigned according to individual dim light melatonin onset. Results: We tested for a group (PER3 5/5 > PER3 4/4) by session effect (WMZ before vs. during SD). From the fi rst evening WMZ (i.e. during a normal waking day) to the second (i.e. following 40 h of continuous waking), PER3 5/5 individuals relative to PER3 4/4 showed significantly larger increase in responses in the left mid-cingulate, bilateral precuneus and thalamus. Interestingly, these regions are involved in executive processes and arousal regulation (thalamus). Conclusions: These results show that the strong circadian wake-maintenance signal depends on sleep pressure, in a PER3-genotype dependent manner. Interestingly, pronounced genotype differences were observed in the thalamus, an area that compensates potential lower cortical activity under SD. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Maquet, Pierre ULg; Schmidt, Christina et al

in Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience [=FNSYS] (2014)

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See detailLa lumière comme stimulant de l’activité cognitive cérébrale
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

in Medecine Sciences : M/S (2014), In press

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See detailCortical excitability dynamics of during sleep deprivation set PVT performance
Borsu, Chloé; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailPrior light history impacts on cognitive brain function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Meyer, Christelle ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailPrior light history impacts on higher order cognitive brain function
Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly, Julien; Meyer, Christelle ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailEffet de la lumière sur les fonctions cognitives non-visuelles
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2014)

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See detailWakefulness regulation: from light to cortical excitability
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2014)

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See detailLight as a modulator of executive and emotional brain functions
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Scientific conference (2014)

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See detailCortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Ly, Julien; Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Conference (2014)

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See detailPhotic memory for executive brain responses
Chellappa*, Sarah Laxhmi ULg; Ly*, Julien ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2014), Epub ahead of print

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See detailAging Reduces the Stimulating Effect of Blue Light on Cognitive Brain Functions
Daneault, Véronique; Hébert, Marc; Albouy, Geneviève et al

in Sleep (2014)

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See detailInfluence of circadian rhythm and PER3 genotype on executive discriminative ability under sleep deprivation during a constant routine
Jaspar, Mathieu ULg; Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg et al

Conference (2013, August 12)

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target ... [more ▼]

Maintaining optimal performance during a working memory task requires not only to detect target items but also to discard fillers. Following signal detection theory, the ability to discriminate target from non-target stimuli is estimated by d prime (d'). Here we assessed whether d' was modulated by the oscillating circadian signal during a 42-hour constant routine while participants performed 13 sessions of auditory 3-back task. We also tested whether the individual vulnerability to sleep loss predicted by the PERIOD3 gene polymorphism would influence this cognitive modulation imposed by sleep/wake regulation. From a sample of about 400 screened volunteers, thirty-five healthy young volunteers (age 19-26; 17 females) were recruited based on the PER3 polymorphism (twelve 5/5 and twenty-three 4/4 homozygotes). A linear mixed model tested on d’ the effect of circadian rhythmicity (based on melatonin level) and PER3 polymorphism. Given that 3back sessions were not administered at equidistant points, we used ranges to center each individual performance on dim light melatonin onset (DLMO). Analyses on d’ showed an effect of circadian oscillation (F(12,302) = 16.05, p< 0.0001), but also an interaction between gene and circadian oscillation (F(12,302)=1,88, p = 0.0362). This interaction was mainly characterized by a worst d’ in PER35/5subjects in the range covering a period between 21 and 23 hours after the DLMO (W=47; p = 0.0426). These results showed that circadian rhythm influence the discriminative ability under constant routine condition. Interestingly, we observed a better performance in PER34/4in the phase preceding the DLMO, but only in situation of high sleep pressure. Those results show that discriminative ability is differently affect by sleep homeostasis in PER3 polymorphism at the same circadian phase. We interpret this as a bigger vulnerability to sleep loss in PER35/5individuals in the period just before the wake maintenance zone. [less ▲]

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See detailLight as a modulator of cognitive brain functions
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2013, May 24)

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