References of "Vandewalle, Gilles"
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See detailLight-sensitive brain pathways and aging
Daneault, Véronique; Dumont, Marie; Massé, Eric et al

in Journal of Physiological Anthropology (2016), 35(9),

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See detailSleep deprivation affects brain global cortical responsiveness
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah et al

Poster (2015, November 26)

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See detailSleep-wake regulation of brain function and cognition
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Scientific conference (2015, November 10)

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Peer Reviewed
See detailSleep deprivation affects global cortical responsiveness
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah et al

Conference (2015, November 02)

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See detailSommeil et maladie neurodégénérative
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2015, October 23)

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See detailSommeil & vieillissement
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailEyes Open on Sleep and Wake: In Vivo to In Silico Neural Networks
Vanvinckenroye, Amaury ULg; Vandewalle, Gilles ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Neural Plasticity (2015)

Functional and effective connectivity of cortical areas are essential for normal brain function under different behavioral states. Appropriate cortical activity during sleep and wakefulness is ensured by ... [more ▼]

Functional and effective connectivity of cortical areas are essential for normal brain function under different behavioral states. Appropriate cortical activity during sleep and wakefulness is ensured by the balanced activity of excitatory and inhibitory circuits. Ultimately, fast, millisecond cortical rhythmic oscillations shape cortical function in time and space. On a much longer time scale, brain function also depends on prior sleep-wake history and circadian processes. However,much remains to be established on how the brain operates at the neuronal level in humans during sleep and wakefulness. A key limitation of human neuroscience is the difficulty in isolating neuronal excitation/inhibition drive in vivo. Therefore, computational models are noninvasive approaches of choice to indirectly access hidden neuronal states. In this review, we present a physiologically driven in silico approach, Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), as a means to comprehend brain function under different experimental paradigms. Importantly, DCM has allowed for the understanding of how brain dynamics underscore brain plasticity, cognition, and different states of consciousness. In a broader perspective, noninvasive computational approaches, such as DCM, may help to puzzle out the spatial and temporal dynamics of human brain function at different behavioural states. [less ▲]

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See detailSleep deprivation affects brain cortical reactivity
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailSeasonality in human cognitive brain responses.
Meyer, Christelle ULg; Muto, Vincenzo ULg; Jaspar, Mathieu ULg et al

Poster (2015, September 04)

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See detailLight, alertness, cognition, and much more
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Scientific conference (2015, April 13)

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See detailL’impact de la lumière sur le cerveau
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Scientific conference (2015, March 24)

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See detailHuman cortical excitability depends on time awake and circadian phase
Gaggioni, Giulia ULg; Ly, Julien; Chellappa, Sarah Laxhmi ULg et al

Poster (2015, January 27)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (16 ULg)
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See detailPushing the Limits: Chronotype and Time of Day Modulate Working Memory-Dependent Cerebral Activity.
Schmidt, Christina ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Reichert, Carolin F. et al

in Frontiers in neurology (2015), 6

Morning-type individuals experience more difficulties to maintain optimal attentional performance throughout a normal waking day than evening types. However, time-of-day modulations may differ across ... [more ▼]

Morning-type individuals experience more difficulties to maintain optimal attentional performance throughout a normal waking day than evening types. However, time-of-day modulations may differ across cognitive domains. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated how chronotype and time of day interact with working memory at different levels of cognitive load/complexity in a N-back paradigm (N0-, N2-, and N3-back levels). Extreme morning- and evening-type individuals underwent two fMRI sessions during N-back performance, one 1.5 h (morning) and one 10.5 h (evening) after wake-up time scheduled according to their habitual sleep-wake preference. At the behavioral level, increasing working memory load resulted in lower accuracy while chronotype and time of day only exerted a marginal impact on performance. Analyses of neuroimaging data disclosed an interaction between chronotype, time of day, and the modulation of cerebral activity by working memory load in the thalamus and in the middle frontal cortex. In the subjective evening hours, evening types exhibited higher thalamic activity than morning types at the highest working memory load condition only (N3-back). Conversely, morning-type individuals exhibited higher activity than evening-type participants in the middle frontal gyrus during the morning session in the N3-back condition. Our data emphasize interindividual differences in time-of-day preferences and underlying cerebral activity, which should be taken into account when investigating vigilance state effects in task-related brain activity. These results support the hypothesis that higher task complexity leads to a chronotype-dependent increase in thalamic and frontal brain activity, permitting stabilization of working memory performance across the day. [less ▲]

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See detailLa Lumière ne sert pas qu’à voir ! Effet de la lumière sur les fonctions cognitives non-visuelles
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

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See detailImpact of light and melanopsin on human cognitive brain function
Vandewalle, Gilles ULg

Conference (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (5 ULg)