References of "Vanderpoorten, Alain"
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See detailRhynchostegiella (Brachytheciaceae): molecular re-circumscription of a convenient taxonomic repository
Aigoin, Delphine ULg; Huttunen, Sanna; Ignatov, Michael et al

in Journal of Bryology (2009), 31

The moss genus Rhynchostegiella (Helicodontioideae, Brachytheciaceae) has long served as a convenient repository for small brachythecioid pleurocarps. Its circumscription is revised in the context of a ... [more ▼]

The moss genus Rhynchostegiella (Helicodontioideae, Brachytheciaceae) has long served as a convenient repository for small brachythecioid pleurocarps. Its circumscription is revised in the context of a chloroplast phylogeny of the Helicodontioideae employing trnL-trnF, atpB-rbcL, psbT-psbH, and psbA-trnH sequence data. The analysis resolves with full posterior probabilities a core Rhynchostegiella clade of eight species. Rhynchostegiella pumila and R. duriaei are both resolved outside that clade and accommodated in their own genera, Microeurhynchium gen. nov. and Pseudorhynchostegiella gen. nov., respectively. Rhynchostegiella leptoneura is sister to Aerolindigia capillacea and R. papuensis is closely related to Eurhynchiella zeyheri. One of the reasons why these unrelated species, together with other taxa, were traditionally included within Rhynchostegiella, is that the genus is morphologically poorly defined by only a single synapomorphic change followed by reversals in half of the species. The Madeiran endemic Brachythecium percurrens is resolved as sister to all the other genera of the Helicodontioideae and is transferred into a new monotypic genus, Hedenasiastrum gen. nov. [less ▲]

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See detailAnd if Engler was not completely wrong? Evidence for multiple evolutionary origins in the moss flora Of Macaronesia
Aigoin, Delphine ULg; Devos, Nicolas ULg; Huttunen, Sanna et al

in Evolution (2009), 63(12), 32483257

The Macaronesian endemic flora has traditionally been interpreted as a relict of a subtropical element that spanned across Europe in the Tertiary. This hypothesis is revisited in the moss subfamily ... [more ▼]

The Macaronesian endemic flora has traditionally been interpreted as a relict of a subtropical element that spanned across Europe in the Tertiary. This hypothesis is revisited in the moss subfamily Helicodontioideae based on molecular divergence estimates derived from two independent calibration techniques either employing fossil evidence or using an Monte Carlo Markov Chain (MCMC) to sample absolute rates of nucleotide substitution from a prior distribution encompassing a wide range of rates documented across land plants. Both analyses suggest that the monotypic Madeiran endemic genus Hedenasiastrum diverged of other Helicodontioideae about 40 million years, that is, well before Macaronesian archipelagos actually emerged, in agreement with the relict hypothesis. Hedenasiastrum is characterized by a plesiomorphic morphology, which is suggestive of a complete morphological stasis over 40 million years. Macaronesian endemic Rhynchostegiella species, whose polyphyletic origin involves multiple colonization events, evolved much more recently, and yet accumulated many more morphological novelties than H. percurrens. The Macaronesian moss flora thus appears as a complex mix of ancient relicts and more recently dispersed, fast-evolving taxa. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen morphology and molecules tell us different stories: a case-in-point with Leptodon corsicus, a new and unique endemic moss species from Corsica
Sotiaux A.; Enroth, J.; Quandt, D. et al

in Journal of Bryology (2009), 31

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See detailNew combinations in the Amblystegiaceae
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Hedenäs, L.

in Journal of Bryology (2009), 31

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See detailConservation Biology
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Hallingbäck, Tomas

in Goffinet, Bernard; Shaw, Jonathan (Eds.) Bryophyte Biology (2009)

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See detailORIGIN AND EVOLUTION OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE DISJUNCTION IN THE MOSS GENUS HOMALOTHECIUM (BRACHYTHECIACEAE)
Huttunen, Sanna; Hedenäs, Lars; Ignatov, Misha et al

in American Journal of Botany (2008)

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See detailThe barriers to oceanic island radiation in bryophytes: insights from the phylogeography of the moss Grimmia montana
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Devos, Nicolas ULg; Goffinet, Bernard et al

in Journal of Biogeography (2008), 35

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See detailHow far and how fast do bryophytes travel at the landscape scale?
Hutsemekers, Virginie ULg; Dopagne, Claude ULg; Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg

in Diversity & Distributions (2008), 14(3), 483-492

Dispersal ability is a factor of prime importance to explain biotic distributions. Yet, it is extremely difficult to measure directly. In this study, we take advantage of the natural experimental design ... [more ▼]

Dispersal ability is a factor of prime importance to explain biotic distributions. Yet, it is extremely difficult to measure directly. In this study, we take advantage of the natural experimental design of slag heap colonization in Belgium to document the timing and range of dispersal of bryophytes at the landscape scale. On the basis of a species atlas with a 4 × 4 km grid, the minimum distance separating species found on 52 slag heaps from potential source populations was determined. Minimum dispersal rates were inferred by coupling the information on minimum distance between slag heap and source populations with time since colonization. The number of species per slag heap is significantly correlated with time since colonization and area size. The frequency distribution of the longest dispersal events is highly skewed, with 44% of the species recruited within the nearest 6 km. In the remaining 56% of the species, recruitments from source populations located within a range of at least 6–86 km occurred within a period of less than 50 years. The majority of the species that are not recruited within the nearest vicinity of the slag heaps, including rare species at the regional scale, occur on slag heaps that have been colonized for 25–50 years. Most recently colonized slag heaps are indeed characterized by 'fugitive', weedy species, whereas slag heaps that have been colonized for > 50 years tend to accumulate perennial species with a 'stayer' life strategy. These observations suggest that rare species may display the dispersal ability to travel across the landscape, but are subsequently limited by their ability to establish a viable community because of more competitive neighbours. Rare species therefore tend to accumulate at intermediate colonization stages, which represent a trade-off between an increasing probability of colonization with time and a decreasing probability of establishment due to competition. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification and characterization of nuclear microsatellite loci in the aquatic moss Platyhypnidium
Hutsemekers, Virginie ULg; Risterucci, A. M.; Ricca, M. et al

in Molecular Ecology Resources (2008), 8

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See detailGeography and host biogeography matter for understanding the phylogeography of a parasite.
Nieberding, Caroline M. ULg; Durette-Desset, Marie-Claude; Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg et al

in Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution (2008), 47(2), 538-54

The co-evolution between hosts and parasites has long been recognized as a fundamental driver of macro-evolutionary patterns of diversification. The effect of co-differentiation on parasite ... [more ▼]

The co-evolution between hosts and parasites has long been recognized as a fundamental driver of macro-evolutionary patterns of diversification. The effect of co-differentiation on parasite diversification is, however, often confounded by underlying geographic patterns of host distribution. In order to disentangle the confounding effects of allopatric versus host speciation, the mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b) gene was sequenced in seventy individuals of the parasitic nematode genus Heligmosomoides sampled in the six Apodemus mice species common in the western Palearctic region. The nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS) 1 and 2 were also sequenced in fifteen parasites to confirm the mitochondrial data. All lineages differentiated according to a geographic pattern and independently from the sampled host species. This suggests that host speciation did not involve concurrent parasite speciation. However, the geographic distribution range of some parasite lineages mirrors that of A. sylvaticus lineages in SW Europe, and that of A. flavicollis lineages in the Balkans and in the Middle East. Thus, regional co-differentiation likely occurred between the parasite and the two sister Apodemus hosts in different parts of their distribution range. We suggest that differences in regional abundances of A. sylvaticus and A. flavicollis are responsible for generating this pattern of regional co-differentiation. This study highlights the importance of integrating both geography and biogeographic information from potential hosts to better understand their parasite phylogeography. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Jardin Botanique National de Belgique doit rester l’outil de tous
Jacquemart, Anne-Laure; Doucet, Jean-Louis ULg; Mahy, Grégory ULg et al

Article for general public (2007)

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See detailBRYOPHYTE CHECKLIST AND EUROPEAN RED LIST OF THE BRUSSELS-CAPITAL REGION, FLANDERS AND WALLONIA (BELGIUM)
Sotiaux, A.; Stieperaere, H.; Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg

in Belgian Journal of Botany (2007), 140

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See detailDOES MACARONESIA EXIST? CONFLICTING SIGNAL IN THE BRYOPHYTE AND PTERIDOPHYTE FLORAS
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Rumsey, F. J.; Carine, M. A.

in American Journal of Botany (2007), 94

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See detailA checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica (France): new records and a review of the literature
Sotiaux, André ULg; Pioli, A.; Royaud, A. et al

in Journal of Bryology (2007), 29(Part 1), 41-53

Based on a thorough review of the literature as well as floristic surveys undertaken over 20 years, a checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica, a mountainous western Mediterranean island, is presented. The ... [more ▼]

Based on a thorough review of the literature as well as floristic surveys undertaken over 20 years, a checklist of the bryophytes of Corsica, a mountainous western Mediterranean island, is presented. The occurrence of 17 liverwort and 44 moss species is documented for the first time from Corsica. As a result, the Corsican bryoflora includes 540 species: 148 liverworts, three hornworts and 389 mosses. Among the species reported, seven liverwort and 17 moss species are red-listed in Europe. By contrast with angiosperms, no bryophyte is endemic to the island based on traditional, phenetic species concepts. The number of new species reported here indicates that Corsica is exceedingly under-recorded bryologically. A better knowledge of the distribution, frequency and ecology of bryophyte species on the island is thus an absolute prerequisite in order to propose appropriate conservation measures in this Mediterranean environment that is, at least locally, severely threatened. [less ▲]

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See detailMapping uncertainty and phylogenetic uncertainty in ancestral character state reconstruction: An example in the moss genus Brachytheciastrum
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Goffinet, B.

in Systematic Biology (2006), 55(6), 957-971

The evolution of species traits along a phylogeny can be examined through an increasing number of possible, but not necessarily complementary, approaches. In this paper, we assess whether deriving ... [more ▼]

The evolution of species traits along a phylogeny can be examined through an increasing number of possible, but not necessarily complementary, approaches. In this paper, we assess whether deriving ancestral states of discrete morphological characters from a model whose parameters are (i) optimized by ML on a most likely tree; (ii) optimized by ML onto each of a Bayesian sample of trees; and (iii) sampled by a MCMC visiting the space of a Bayesian sample of trees affects the reconstruction of ancestral states in the moss genus Brachytheciastrum. In the first two methods, the choice of a single- or two-rate model and of a genetic distance (wherein branch lengths are used to determine the probabilities of change) or speciational (wherein changes are only driven by speciation events) model based upon a likelihood-ratio test strongly depended on the sampled trees. Despite these differences in model selection, reconstructions of ancestral character states were strongly correlated to each others across nodes, often at r > 0.9, for all the characters. The Bayesian approach of ancestral character state reconstruction offers, however, a series of advantages over the single-tree approach or the ML model optimization on a Bayesian sample of trees because it does not involve restricting model parameters prior to reconstructing ancestral states, but rather allows a range of model parameters and ancestral character states to be sampled according to their posterior probabilities. From the distribution of the latter, conclusions on trait evolution can be made in a more satisfactorily way than when a substantial part of the uncertainty of the results is obscured by the focus on a single set of model parameters and associated ancestral states. The reconstructions of ancestral character states in Brachytheciastrum reveal rampant parallel morphological evolution. Most species previously described based on phenetic grounds are thus resolved of polyphyletic origin. Species polyphylly has been increasingly reported among mosses, raising severe reservations regarding current species definition. [less ▲]

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See detailBudding speciation and neotropical origin of the Azorean endemic liverwort, Leptoscyphus azoricus
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Long, D. G.

in Molecular Phylogenetics & Evolution (2006), 40(1), 73-83

The origin of plant species endemism in Macaronesia, one of the 25 world biodiversity hotspots, has traditionally been either interpreted as a result of the dramatic reduction of a broader tertiary ... [more ▼]

The origin of plant species endemism in Macaronesia, one of the 25 world biodiversity hotspots, has traditionally been either interpreted as a result of the dramatic reduction of a broader tertiary distribution range during the Ice Age or neoendemism. This hypothesis is tested here in the context of a species-level phylogeny employing chloroplast trnL-trnF and atpB-rbcL sequences in the leafy liverwort genus Leptoscyphus (Lophocoleaceae). The data suggest that the Azorean endemic Leptoscyphus azoricus originated from parental populations of the Neotropical Leptoscyphus porphyrius by long-distance dispersal across the Atlantic and subsequent isolation. Possible reasons for the differences in the origin of endemism in angiosperms, wherein by far most endemic species have their close relatives on the European and North African continents, are discussed. (c) 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA GIS-based model of the distribution of the rare liverwort Aneura maxima at the landscape scale for an improved assessment of its conservation status
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Sotiaux, André ULg; Engels, Patrick ULg

in Biodiversity & Conservation (2006), 15(3), 829-838

Testing whether rare species are limited by narrow habitat conditions from correlations between species occurrence and measured environmental factors is usually hampered by the lack of statistical power ... [more ▼]

Testing whether rare species are limited by narrow habitat conditions from correlations between species occurrence and measured environmental factors is usually hampered by the lack of statistical power associated to the low number of observations. Aneura maxima is an exceedingly rare liverwort in Europe whose recent discovery precluded the inclusion within the Red Data Book of European bryophytes. A series of new observations resulting from intensive bryophyte grid-mapping at the border between France and Belgium allowed the statistical investigation of the factors accounting for its distribution at the landscape scale. The species was systematically observed in deep ravines on damp, loamy soils under light tree cover within broadleaf woodlands. These conditions differ from those of other European localities, suggesting that A. maxima is not limited by a narrow ecological range. Attempting to predict the occurrence of A. maxima at the landscape scale from data on land use and soil conditions resulted in a model where the species was actually observed in only a half of the squares where its probability of occurrence was the highest. The species thus does not seem to have colonized all its potential habitats, which may be explained by the poor dispersal ability of this dioecious, rarely fertile species. Given the relative frequency of A. maxima in the Semois river basin, but taking into account its seemingly low dispersal ability and its preference for swampy habitats that are threatened by draining and spruce plantations, a status as 'conservation dependent' to 'near threatened' within the category 'lower risk' is proposed. [less ▲]

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See detailNew national and regional bryophyte records, 12
Blockeel, T. L.; Chlebicko, A.; Hajkova, P. et al

in Journal of Bryology (2006), 28(1), 68-70

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See detailUtility of the Internal Transcribed Spacers of the 18S-5.8S-26S Nuclear Ribosomal DNA in Land Plant Systematics with Special Emphasis on Bryophytes
Vanderpoorten, Alain ULg; Quandt, D.; Goffinet, B.

in Plant Genome: Biodiversity and Evolution—Vol. 2, Part B (2006)

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