References of "Vanderick, Sylvie"
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See detailFeasibility of a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids in dairy cattle
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Arnould, Valérie ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg et al

Conference (2010, July)

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The ... [more ▼]

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The objective was to show that a genetic evaluation for milk FA in dairy cattle is feasible in the Walloon region of Belgium and to report first results. Estimated breeding values (EBV) and associated reliabilities (REL) were computed using a multi-trait test-day animal model similar to the one used for the routine genetic evaluation for yield traits. Studied traits were first lactation test-day milk, fat and protein yields, fat (FAT) and protein contents, and content of saturated fatty acids in milk (g/100g of milk, SAT). More than 6,700,000 records were available for common production and content traits and 194,000 records were used for SAT. Used variance components were estimated using REML. The average SAT content was 2.79% with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.50%. A total of 1,707 Holstein bulls used in Walloon Region had REL superior to 0.49 for all studied traits. REL for SAT ranged from 0.53 to 0.99. A total of 1,217 bulls had REL superior to 0.74. SD of EBV for SAT was 0.20%. The maximum and minimum SAT EBV values were 0.89% and -0.69%, respectively. In order to have a direct measure of the part of FAT that is not due to SAT, a new trait (dSAT) was post-evaluated and defined as difference between expected SAT EBV for a given FAT EBV and the estimated EBV for SAT. This new trait can be assumed to be a direct predictor of the content of unsaturated fatty acids in fat. The interest is that this trait cannot be accurately predicted directly by MIR. The maximum and minimum EBV for dSAT for the 1,707 bulls were -0.28% and 0.24%, respectively. Based on these results, a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids is feasible. In the bull population used recently, a genetic variability for dSAT exists and could be used to improve the milk fat composition. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic evaluation for body condition score in the Walloon Region of Belgium
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gillon, Alain ULg; Massart, Xavier et al

Conference (2010, June 02)

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See detailGenetic evaluation for body condition score in the Walloon region of Belgium
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gillon, Alain ULg; Massart, Xavier et al

in Interbull Bulletin (2010), 42

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See detailFeasibility of a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids in dairy cattle
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Arnould, Valérie ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2010), 93(E-Suppl 1), 744

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The ... [more ▼]

Recent development of equations based on mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry for the prediction of milk fatty acid (FA) contents allows their measurement on a large scale during performance recording. The objective was to show that a genetic evaluation for milk FA in dairy cattle is feasible in the Walloon region of Belgium and to report first results. Estimated breeding values (EBV) and associated reliabilities (REL) were computed using a multi-trait test-day animal model similar to the one used for the routine genetic evaluation for yield traits. Studied traits were first lactation test-day milk, fat and protein yields, fat (FAT) and protein contents, and content of saturated fatty acids in milk (g/100g of milk, SAT). More than 6,700,000 records were available for common production and content traits and 194,000 records were used for SAT. Used variance components were estimated using REML. The average SAT content was 2.79% with a standard deviation (SD) of 0.50%. A total of 1,707 Holstein bulls used in Walloon Region had REL superior to 0.49 for all studied traits. REL for SAT ranged from 0.53 to 0.99. A total of 1,217 bulls had REL superior to 0.74. SD of EBV for SAT was 0.20%. The maximum and minimum SAT EBV values were 0.89% and -0.69%, respectively. In order to have a direct measure of the part of FAT that is not due to SAT, a new trait (dSAT) was post-evaluated and defined as difference between expected SAT EBV for a given FAT EBV and the estimated EBV for SAT. This new trait can be assumed to be a direct predictor of the content of unsaturated fatty acids in fat. The interest is that this trait cannot be accurately predicted directly by MIR. The maximum and minimum EBV for dSAT for the 1,707 bulls were -0.28% and 0.24%, respectively. Based on these results, a genetic evaluation for milk fatty acids is feasible. In the bull population used recently, a genetic variability for dSAT exists and could be used to improve the milk fat composition. [less ▲]

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See detailFemale fertility expression in Walloon dairy cattle
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Proceedings of the 9th World Congress on Genetics Applied to Livestock Production, Leipzig, Germany, 1-6 August, 2010 (2010)

A useful method to express female fertility of the Walloon dairy cattle using direct and indirect female fertility information was considered. Data were based on results of the genetic evaluation of ... [more ▼]

A useful method to express female fertility of the Walloon dairy cattle using direct and indirect female fertility information was considered. Data were based on results of the genetic evaluation of pregnancy rate for 606,328 Holstein cows and on INTERBULL proofs of female fertility for 88,496 bulls. A direct female fertility index (DFF), using INTERBULL proofs, was developed from results of a principal component analysis carried out on 6 published foreign female fertility indexes. An indirect female fertility index (IFF) was also developed from ten other traits evaluated in Walloon Region. Theory of selection index was used to combine DFF and IFF in a global index called combined female fertility index (CFF). This index allowed young bulls to have better reliabilities with an average increase of 12% leading to extra 4,019 of publishable bulls for female fertility. [less ▲]

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See detailExpressing female fertility in the Walloon region of Belgium: how to do?
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

Conference (2009, August)

Since September 2007, the Walloon Region of Belgium has used a genetic evaluation system for pregnancy rate in Holsteins and has participated in 3 of the 5 MACE trait INTERBULL runs for female fertility ... [more ▼]

Since September 2007, the Walloon Region of Belgium has used a genetic evaluation system for pregnancy rate in Holsteins and has participated in 3 of the 5 MACE trait INTERBULL runs for female fertility. In order to define general way of female fertility expression, a principal component analysis was carried out on six published foreign female fertility indexes. Results of were used to compute a direct female fertility index with the INTERBULL international female fertility proofs available on the Walloon scale. An indirect female fertility index was also developed in order to increase reliability of young bulls. Approximate procedure based on selection index was used to combine both indexes in an overall index called combined female fertility index. This index was highly correlated with the direct female fertility index (.96) and the first principal component (.85), therefore it was considered as good expression of female fertility. Moreover, this allowed recovering 4,019 INTERBULL bulls with a publishable female fertility index. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimation of test-day model (co)variance components across breeds using New Zealand dairy cattle data
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Harris, Bevin; Pryce, Jenny et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2009), 92(3), 1240-1252

In New Zealand, a large proportion of cows are currently crossbreds, mostly Holstein-Friesians (HF) x Jersey (JE). The genetic evaluation system for milk yields is considering the same additive genetic ... [more ▼]

In New Zealand, a large proportion of cows are currently crossbreds, mostly Holstein-Friesians (HF) x Jersey (JE). The genetic evaluation system for milk yields is considering the same additive genetic effects for all breeds. The objective was to model different additive effects according to parental breeds to obtain first estimates of correlations among breed-specific effects and to study the usefulness of this type of random regression test-day model. Estimates of (co) variance components for purebred HF and JE cattle in purebred herds were computed by using a single-breed model. This analysis showed differences between the 2 breeds, with a greater variability in the HF breed. (Co) variance components for purebred HF and JE and crossbred HF x JE cattle were then estimated by using a complete multibreed model in which computations of complete across-breed (co)variances were simplified by correlating only eigenvectors for HF and JE random regressions of the same order as obtained from the single-breed analysis. Parameter estimates differed more strongly than expected between the single-breed and multibreed analyses, especially for JE. This could be due to differences between animals and management in purebred and nonpurebred herds. In addition, the model used only partially accounted for heterosis. The multibreed analysis showed additive genetic differences between the HF and JE breeds, expressed as genetic correlations of additive effects in both breeds, especially in linear and quadratic Legendre polynomials (respectively, 0.807 and 0.604). The differences were small for overall milk production (0.926). Results showed that permanent environmental lactation curves were highly correlated across breeds; however, intraherd lactation curves were also affected by the breed-environment interaction. This result may indicate the existence of breed-specific competition effects that vary through the different lactation stages. In conclusion, a multibreed model similar to the one presented could optimally use the environmental and genetic parameters and provide breed-dependent additive breeding values. This model could also be a useful tool to evaluate crossbred dairy cattle populations like those in New Zealand. However, a routine evaluation would still require the development of an improved methodology. It would also be computationally very challenging because of the simultaneous presence of a large number of breeds. [less ▲]

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See detailGenomic location of the bovine growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghsr) gene and investigation of genetic polymorphism
Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Charloteaux, Benoît ULg et al

in Animal Biotechnology (2009), 20(1), 28-33

The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is involved in the regulation of energetic homeostasis and GH secretion. In this study, the bovine GHSR gene was mapped to BTA1 between BL26 and BMS4004 ... [more ▼]

The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is involved in the regulation of energetic homeostasis and GH secretion. In this study, the bovine GHSR gene was mapped to BTA1 between BL26 and BMS4004. Two different bovine GHSR CDS (GHSR1a and GHSR1b) were sequenced. Six polymorphisms (five SNPs and one 3-bp indel) were also identified, three of them leading to amino acid variations L24V, D194N, and Del R242. These variations are located in the extracellular N-terminal end, the exoloop 2, and the cytoloop 3 of the receptor, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailExpressing female fertility in the Walloon region of Belgium: how to do?
Vanderick, Sylvie ULg; Bastin, Catherine ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg

in Interbull Bulletin (2009), 40

Since September 2007, the Walloon Region of Belgium has used a genetic evaluation system for pregnancy rate in Holsteins and has participated in 3 of the 5 MACE trait INTERBULL runs for female fertility ... [more ▼]

Since September 2007, the Walloon Region of Belgium has used a genetic evaluation system for pregnancy rate in Holsteins and has participated in 3 of the 5 MACE trait INTERBULL runs for female fertility. In order to define general way of female fertility expression, a principal component analysis was carried out on six published foreign female fertility indexes. Results of were used to compute a direct female fertility index with the INTERBULL international female fertility proofs available on the Walloon scale. An indirect female fertility index was also developed in order to increase reliability of young bulls. Approximate procedure based on selection index was used to combine both indexes in an overall index called combined female fertility index. This index was highly correlated with the direct female fertility index (.96) and the first principal component (.85), therefore it was considered as good expression of female fertility. Moreover, this allowed recovering 4,019 INTERBULL bulls with a publishable female fertility index. [less ▲]

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See detailAccuracy of prediction of gene content in large animal populations and its use for candidate gene detection and genetic evaluation
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Abras, S.; Verkenne, C. et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2008), 91(4), 1652-1659

To estimate and to use the effects of single genes on quantitative traits, genotypes need to be known. However, in large animal populations, the majority of animals are not genotyped. These missing ... [more ▼]

To estimate and to use the effects of single genes on quantitative traits, genotypes need to be known. However, in large animal populations, the majority of animals are not genotyped. These missing genotypes have to be estimated. However, currently used methods are impractical for large pedigrees. An alternative method to estimate missing gene content, defined as the number of copies of a particular allele, was recently developed. In this study, the proposed method was tested by assessing its accuracy in estimation and use of gene content in large animal populations. This was done for the bovine transmembrane growth hormone receptor and its effects on first-lactation milk, fat, and protein test-day yields and somatic cell score in Holstein cows. Estimated gene substitution effects of replacing a copy of the phenylalanine-coding allele with a copy of the tyrosine-coding allele were 295 g/d for milk, -8.14 g/d for fat, -1.83 g/d for protein, and -0.022/d for somatic cell score. However, only the gene substitution effect for milk was found to be significant. The accuracy of the estimated effects was evaluated by simulations and permutations. To validate the use of predicted gene content in a mixed inheritance model, a cross-validation study was done. The model with an additional regression of milk, fat, and protein yields and SCS on predicted gene content showed a better capacity to predict breeding values for milk, fat, and protein. Given these results, the estimation and use of allelic effects using this method proved functional and accurate. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results of body condition score modeling for Walloon Holstein cows
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Laloux, Laurent; Gillon, Alain ULg et al

Conference (2007, August 25)

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See detailEstimation of heritability and genetic correlations for the major fatty acids in bovine milk
Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Gillon, Alain ULg; Vanderick, Sylvie ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2007), 90(9), 4435-4442

The current cattle selection program for dairy cattle in the Walloon region of Belgium does not consider the relative content of the different fatty acids (FA) in milk. However, interest by the local ... [more ▼]

The current cattle selection program for dairy cattle in the Walloon region of Belgium does not consider the relative content of the different fatty acids (FA) in milk. However, interest by the local dairy industry in differentiated milk products is increasing. Therefore, farmers may be interested in selecting their animals based on the fat composition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of genetic selection to improve the nutritional quality of bovine milk fat. The heritabilities and correlations among milk yield, fat, protein, and major FA contents in milk were estimated. Heritabilities for FA in milk and fat ranged from 5 to 38%. The genetic correlations estimated among FA reflected the common origin of several groups of FA. Given these results, an index including FA contents with the similar metabolic process of production in the mammary gland could be used, for example, to increase the monounsaturated and conjugated fatty acids in milk. Moreover, the genetic correlations between the percentage of fat and the content of C14:0, C12:0, C16:0, and C18:0 in fat were −0.06, 0.55, 0.60, and 0.84, respectively. This result demonstrates that an increase in fat content is not directly correlated with undesirable changes in FA profile in milk for human health. Based on the obtained genetic parameters, a future selection program to improve the FA composition of milk fat could be initiated. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst results of body condition score modeling for Walloon Holstein cows
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Laloux, Laurent; Gillon, Alain ULg et al

in Interbull Bulletin (2007), 37

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (17 ULg)