References of "Van der Linden, Martial"
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See detailLooking for Outcomes: The Experience of Control and Sense of Agency in Obsessive-compulsive Behaviors
Belayachi, Sanaa ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Balconi, Michela (Ed.) Neuropsychology of the Sense of Agency (2010)

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be conceptualized as a disturbance of control over one’s thoughts and actions, and through them, over external events. Classically, there are two general approaches ... [more ▼]

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be conceptualized as a disturbance of control over one’s thoughts and actions, and through them, over external events. Classically, there are two general approaches to the explanation of OCD symptoms: a cognitive account that emphasizes the important role played by dysfunctional beliefs in the exaggerated appraisals of negative outcomes (i.e., harm avoidance) and a sensory phenomena account that highlights the role of impaired action monitoring in inconsistent feelings of dissatisfaction with actual outcomes (i.e., incompleteness). In this chapter, we review the phenomenology of these two OCD manifestations in light of the sense of agency framework. We argue that harm avoidance and incompleteness should be construed as distinct forms of defective outcome processing, leading to distinct impairments of the experience of action. [less ▲]

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See detailThe commonality of neural networks for verbal and visual short-term memory.
Majerus, Steve ULg; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Martinez Perez, Trecy ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22(11), 2570-2593

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared ... [more ▼]

Although many neuroimaging studies have considered verbal and visual short-term memory (STM) as relying on neurally segregated short-term buffer systems, the present study explored the existence of shared neural correlates supporting verbal and visual STM. We hypothesized that networks involved in attentional and executive processes, as well as networks involved in serial order processing, underlie STM for both verbal and visual list information, with neural specificity restricted to sensory areas involved in processing the specific items to be retained. Participants were presented sequences of nonwords or unfamiliar faces, and were instructed to maintain and recognize order or item information. For encoding and retrieval phases, null conjunction analysis revealed an identical fronto-parieto-cerebellar network comprising the left intraparietal sulcus, bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral cerebellum, irrespective of information type and modality. A network centered around the right intraparietal sulcus supported STM for order information, in both verbal and visual modalities. Modality-specific effects were observed in left superior temporal and mid-fusiform areas associated with phonological and orthographic processing during the verbal STM tasks, and in right hippocampal and fusiform face processing areas during the visual STM tasks, wherein these modality effects were most pronounced when storing item information. The present results suggest that STM emerges from the deployment of modality-independent attentional and serial ordering processes toward sensory networks underlying the processing and storage of modality-specific item information. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotion and false memories: affective valence influences participant’s susceptibility to false memories and illusory recollection.
Dehon, Hedwige ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Emotion (2010), 10(5), 627-639

This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive or negative DRM lists for a ... [more ▼]

This study examined the influence of emotional valence on the production of DRM false memories (Roediger & McDermott, 1995). Participants were presented with neutral, positive or negative DRM lists for a later recognition (Experiment 1) or recall (Experiment 2) test. In both experiments, confidence and recollective experience (i.e., “Remember-Know” judgements; Tulving, 1985) were also assessed. Results consistently showed that, compared with neutral lists, affective lists induced more false recognition and recall of non presented critical lures. Moreover, although confidence ratings did not differ between the false remembering from the different kinds of lists, “Remember” responses were more often associated with negative than positive and neutral false remembering of the critical lures. In contrast, positive false remembering of the critical lures was more often associated with “Know” responses. These results are discussed in light of the Paradoxical Negative Emotion (PNE) hypothesis (Porter et al., 2008). [less ▲]

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See detailThe contribution of familiarity to within- and between-domain associative recognition memory: Use of a modified remember/know procedure
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Schnakers, Caroline ULg et al

in European Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2010), 22(6), 922-943

The purpose of the present study was to determine the extent to which familiarity can support associative recognition memory as a function of whether the associations are within- or between-domain ... [more ▼]

The purpose of the present study was to determine the extent to which familiarity can support associative recognition memory as a function of whether the associations are within- or between-domain. Standard recognition and familiarity only performance were compared in different participants, using a new adaptation of the remember/know procedure. The results indicated that within-domain (face face) associative recognition was mainly supported by familiarity. In contrast, familiarity provided relatively poor support to between-domain (face name) associative recognition for which optimal performance required a major recollection contribution. These findings suggest that familiarity can support associative recognition memory, particularly for within-domain associations, and contrast with the widely held view that associative recognition depends largely on recollection. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations of hallucination proneness with free-recall intrusions and response bias in a non-clinical sample
Brébion, G.; Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2010), 32

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See detailModulation of medial prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices when thinking about past, present, and future selves.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Social Neuroscience (2010), 5

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that reflecting on representations of the present self versus temporally distant selves is associated with higher activity in the medial prefrontal cortex ... [more ▼]

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that reflecting on representations of the present self versus temporally distant selves is associated with higher activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). In the current fMRI study, we investigated whether this effect of temporal perspective is symmetrical between the past and future. The main results revealed that the MPFC showed higher activity when reflecting on the present self than when reflecting on past and future selves, with no difference between past and future selves. Temporal perspective also modulated activity in the right inferior parietal cortex but in the opposite direction, activity in this brain region being higher when reflecting on past and future selves relative to the present self (with again no difference between past and future selves). These findings show that differences in brain activity when thinking about current versus temporally distant selves are symmetrical between the past and the future. It is suggested that by processing degrees of self-relatedness, the MPFC might sustain the process of identifying oneself with current representations of the self, whereas the right inferior parietal cortex might be involved in distinguishing the present self from temporally distant selves. [less ▲]

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See detailNarrative identity in schizophrenia.
Raffard, Stephane; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Lardi, Claudia et al

in Consciousness & Cognition (2010), 19(1), 328-40

This study examined narrative identity in a group of 81 patients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls through the recall of self-defining memories. The results indicated that patients' narratives ... [more ▼]

This study examined narrative identity in a group of 81 patients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls through the recall of self-defining memories. The results indicated that patients' narratives were less coherent and elaborate than those of controls. Schizophrenia patients were severely impaired in the ability to make connections with the self and extract meaning from their memories, which significantly correlated with illness duration. In agreement with earlier research, patients exhibited an early reminiscence bump. Moreover, the period of the reminiscence bump, which is highly relevant for identity development, was characterized by fewer achievements and more life-threatening event experiences, compared with controls. A negative correlation was found between negative symptoms, number of self-event connections and specificity of narratives. Our results suggest that schizophrenia patients have difficulties to organize and extract meaning from their past experiences in order to create coherent personal narratives. [less ▲]

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See detailFurther characterisation of self-defining memories in young adults: a study of a Swiss sample.
Lardi, Claudia; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Chanal, Julien et al

in Memory (2010), 18(3), 293-309

Several individual differences affecting four dimensions of self-defining memories (SDMs)--structure, content, affect, and autobiographical reasoning (Blagov & Singer, 2004; McLean & Fournier, 2008 ... [more ▼]

Several individual differences affecting four dimensions of self-defining memories (SDMs)--structure, content, affect, and autobiographical reasoning (Blagov & Singer, 2004; McLean & Fournier, 2008; Singer & Salovey, 1993)--have been observed in young adults (principally in North America). In this study we aimed to investigate the relationships between the different dimensions of SDMs, providing further evidence of the content validity of the Self-Defining Memory task. It was possible to discern two specific profiles from the three SDMs collected from each participant. Almost half the participants retrieved specific SDMs with little autobiographical reasoning and tension; the other participants retrieved an opposite profile, suggesting that there are individual differences in the cognitive and affective processes related to the construction of SDMs. The second aim of the study was to conduct across-cultural extension of research on SDMs, using a sample of Swiss young adults. The results were similar to those obtained by previous studies, suggesting a certain cultural invariability. The only difference observed concerned the number of SDMs containing meaning making. Swiss young adults attribute more explicit meanings to their memories than North American young adults, suggesting that they are more engaged in autobiographical reasoning. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Stawarczyk, David ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe mere exposure effect without recognition can depend on the way you look!
Willems, Sylvie ULg; dedonder, jonathan; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Experimental Psychology (2010), 57(3), 185-192

In line with [Whittlesea, B. W. A., & Price, J. R. (2001). Implicit/Explicit memory versus analytic/nonanalytic processing: Rethinking the mere exposure effect. Memory and Cognition, 26, 547-565], we ... [more ▼]

In line with [Whittlesea, B. W. A., & Price, J. R. (2001). Implicit/Explicit memory versus analytic/nonanalytic processing: Rethinking the mere exposure effect. Memory and Cognition, 26, 547-565], we investigated whether the memory effect measured with an implicit memory paradigm (mere exposure effect) and an explicit recognition task depended on perceptual processing strategies, regardless of whether the task required intentional retrieval. We found that manipulation intended to prompt functional implicit-explicit dissociation no longer had a differential effect when we induced similar perceptual strategies in both tasks. Indeed, the results showed that prompting a nonanalytic strategy ensured performance above chance on both tasks. Conversely, inducing an analytic strategy drastically decreased both explicit and implicit performance. Furthermore, we noted that the nonanalytic strategy involved less extensive gaze scanning than the analytic strategy and that memory effects under this processing strategy were largely independent of gaze movement. [less ▲]

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See detailScene construction in schizophrenia
Raffard, Stéphane; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Bayard, Sophie et al

in Neuropsychology (2010), 24

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See detailComponent processes underlying future thinking
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Ortoleva, Claudia; Jumentier, Sabrina et al

in Memory & Cognition (2010), 38

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See detailPatients with Alzheimer's disease use metamemory to attenuate the Jacoby-Whitehouse illusion.
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Germain, Sophie ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Neuropsychologia (2009), 47(12), 2672-6

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual ... [more ▼]

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual fluency. Using the Jacoby and Whitehouse [Jacoby, L.L., & Whitehouse, K. (1989). An illusion of memory: False recognition influenced by unconscious perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 118, 126-135] illusion paradigm, we extended these findings and found that AD patients were also sensitive to perceptually driven false recognition. However, AD patients were equally able to disregard perceptual fluency when there was a shift in the sensory modality of the study and test stages. Overall, these findings support the notion that patients with AD can be susceptible to fluency-based memory illusions but these patients can strategically control the fluency attribution following their metamemory expectation in exactly the same way as elderly adults and young adults. [less ▲]

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See detailLevel of agency in sub-clinical checking
Belayachi, Sanaa ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2009), 18(1), 293-299

This study examined cognitive representations of routine action, through the assessment of level of agency, in individuals with sub-clinical checking. The level of agency stems from Action Identification ... [more ▼]

This study examined cognitive representations of routine action, through the assessment of level of agency, in individuals with sub-clinical checking. The level of agency stems from Action Identification Theory [Vallacher, R. R., Wegner, D. M. (1989). Levels of personal agency: Individual variation in action identification. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 57, 660-671], which states that how actions are usually identified (based on instrumental aspects or purpose) reflects the predominant accessibility of internal representation (movements executed vs. goal pursued). Furthermore, this framework proposed that altered action regulation is related to low-level of agency (i.e., action identification at an instrumental level). In the current study, the main result indicated that checking symptoms were related to a low-level of agency, that is, individuals with sub-clinical checking identified habitual actions on the basis of instrumental aspects. This seems to indicate that checkers may act with a lack of goal representations. The results are discussed in terms of the role of low-level of agency in checking phenomena and related cognitive dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive rehabilitation of the updating sub-component of working memory in schizophrenia: a case study.
Levaux, Marie-Noëlle ULg; Vezzaro, J.; Laroi, Frank ULg et al

in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation (2009), 19(2), 244-73

Working memory problems have been identified as a core cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. In this paper, we present the results of a cognitive rehabilitation programme (Duval & Coyette, 2005 ... [more ▼]

Working memory problems have been identified as a core cognitive deficit in schizophrenia. In this paper, we present the results of a cognitive rehabilitation programme (Duval & Coyette, 2005) administered to a schizophrenia patient, and specifically designed to improve the updating sub-component of working memory. The original feature of this programme was that it involved two types of updating exercises: cognitive and ecological. The purpose was to enable the patient to acquire cognitive strategies that alleviate the mental load of the central executive and to transfer them to daily life. The specificity and efficacy of the programme were assessed with multiple (cognitive, ecological and non-target) baseline measurements. In addition, several questionnaires were administered to assess the effect of the programme on subjective cognitive complaints affecting daily life, psychiatric symptoms and self-esteem. The results demonstrated the efficacy of the rehabilitation programme on the updating function and the generalisation of these beneficial effects to daily life. A significant decrease in both subjective cognitive complaints and psychiatric symptoms was also observed. However, the patient's self-esteem did not improve. [less ▲]

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See detailRemédiation cognitive des patients schizophrènes dans les pays francophones
Levaux, Marie-Noëlle ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg; Danion, Jean-Marie et al

in EMC, Psychiatrie (2009)

La schizophrénie est associée à des déficits cognitifs variés qui affectent les capacités fonctionnelles des patients : relations sociales, insertion professionnelle, activités de la vie quotidienne. Les ... [more ▼]

La schizophrénie est associée à des déficits cognitifs variés qui affectent les capacités fonctionnelles des patients : relations sociales, insertion professionnelle, activités de la vie quotidienne. Les troubles cognitifs interviennent également dans le développement de certains types de symptômes cliniques (délires, hallucinations). Pour faire face à ces déficits, une prise en charge de type cognitif a vu le jour et différents programmes ont été développés. Cette revue de la littérature décrit les programmes de remédiation cognitive utilisés dans les pays francophones. Des résultats prometteurs en termes d’amélioration des fonctionnements cognitif et psychosocial ont été obtenus. Cependant, pour la plupart de ces programmes, des études de validation et d’évaluation de l’efficacité à long terme sont encore à réaliser. Plusieurs recommandations sont énoncées pour les études futures, en particulier dans le but d’améliorer la généralisation des effets de la remédiation cognitive au fonctionnement dans la vie quotidienne. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of auditory selective attention on verbal short-term memory and vocabulary development
Majerus, Steve ULg; Heiligenstein, Lucie; Gautherot, N. et al

in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (2009), 103

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See detailSerial order short-term memory capacities and specific language impairment: No evidence for a causal association
Majerus, Steve ULg; Leclercq, Anne-Lise ULg; Grossman, Aurélie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2009), 45

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See detailDoes implicit memory during anaesthesia persist in children?
Lopez, Ursula; Habre, w; Laurencon, M. et al

in British Journal of Anaesthesia (2009), 102(3), 37984

Background. Recent studies suggest that implicit memory (especially perceptual implicit memory) persists during adequate general anaesthesia in adults. Studies in children, however, have failed to ... [more ▼]

Background. Recent studies suggest that implicit memory (especially perceptual implicit memory) persists during adequate general anaesthesia in adults. Studies in children, however, have failed to demonstrate implicit memory during general anaesthesia, possibly because of differences in methodological design. We therefore designed a prospective study with the aim of evaluating implicit memory in children undergoing general anaesthesia, using a perceptual memory test based on the mere exposure effect, previously tested in a control group. Methods. Twelve infrequent neutral words were played 12 times in a random sequence via headphones to 36 children aged 8–12 yr during elective or emergency surgery. The children were not premedicated, and general anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. The word presentation started immediately after the surgical incision. Within 36 h after the stimulus presentation, the memory was assessed by using a forced-choice preference judgement task. Time constraint and word deterioration with a low-pass filter were used to prevent the subjects from utilizing intentional retrieval. The implicit memory score was obtained by calculating the proportion of target words preferred, which was compared with the chance level (0.5). Results. The percentage of correct responses given by the children was comparable with the chance level. The memory score was mean (SD) 0.48 (0.16) (95% CI 0.43–0.53). Conclusions. The use of a perceptual implicit memory test based on the mere exposure procedure in children failed to reveal any evidence of implicit memory under general anaesthesia. [less ▲]

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See detailInhibitory control of memory in normal ageing: Dissociation between impaired intentional and preserved unintentional processes.
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Germain, Sophie ULg; Hogge, Michaël et al

in Memory (2009), 17(1), 104-122

The aim of this study was to compare the performance of elderly and young participants on a series of memory tasks involving either intentional or unintentional inhibitory control of memory content ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to compare the performance of elderly and young participants on a series of memory tasks involving either intentional or unintentional inhibitory control of memory content. Intentional inhibition processes in working and episodic memory were explored with directed forgetting tasks and in semantic memory with the Hayling task. Unintentional inhibitory processes in working memory, long-term memory, and semantic memory were explored with an interference resolution task, the retrieval practice paradigm, and the flanker task, respectively. The results indicate that elderly participants' performance on the two directed forgetting tasks and the Hayling task is lower than that of young ones, and that this impairment is not related to their initial memory capacity. This suggests that there is a specific dysfunction affecting intentional inhibitory control of memory contents in normal ageing. [less ▲]

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