References of "Van der Linden, Martial"
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See detailWord priming in normal aging with a task that circumvent explicit memory contamination
Adam, Stéphane ULg; Gouvars, Sébastien; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Poster (2001, July 18)

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See detailAge differences, cognitive control, and prefrontal cortex in the process dissociation procedure
Chicherio, Christian; Ludwig, C.; de Ribaupierre, S. et al

Poster (2001, July 18)

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See detailImpaired controlled recollection processes in depression and subjective memory complaints
Jermann, Françoise; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Ceschi, Grazia et al

Poster (2001, July 18)

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See detailContribution of Lexico-Semantic Processes to Verbal Short-Term Memory Tasks: A Pet Activation Study
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Memory (2001), 9(4-6), 249-259

Recent studies have demonstrated the intervention of long-term memory processes in verbal STM tasks and several cognitive models have been proposed to explain these effects. A PET study was performed in ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have demonstrated the intervention of long-term memory processes in verbal STM tasks and several cognitive models have been proposed to explain these effects. A PET study was performed in order to determine whether supplementary cerebral areas are involved when subjects have to execute short-term memory tasks for items having representations in long-term memory (in comparison to items without such representations: words vs non-words). Results indicate that verbal STM for words specifically involves the left middle temporal gyrus (BA 21) and temporo-parietal junction (BA 39). These areas can be associated with lexical and semantic processes. These results are in agreement with cognitive models that postulate the simultaneous influence of lexical and semantic long-term representations on verbal STM processes and/or a lexico-semantic buffer. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of phonological abilities and phonological STM in Williams syndrome.
Majerus, Steve ULg; Palmisano, I.; Barisinikov, K. et al

Conference (2001, February)

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See detailElaboration d'une batterie d'évaluation des fonctions cognitives de sujets âgés porteurs d'un syndrome de Down
Georges, M.; Théwis, B.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Revue de Neuropsychologie (2001), 11

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See detailAcquisition of a novel vocabulary in an amnesic patient
Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Cornil, Valérie; Meulemans, Thierry ULg et al

in Neurocase : Case Studies in Neuropsychology, Neuropsychiatry & Behavioural Neurology (2001), 7(4), 283-293

This study explored the ability of a severe amnesic patient (AC) to acquire new vocabulary words. We compared AC's knowledge of words entered into the French lexicon during three different periods: before ... [more ▼]

This study explored the ability of a severe amnesic patient (AC) to acquire new vocabulary words. We compared AC's knowledge of words entered into the French lexicon during three different periods: before 1920, between 1965 and 1985, and after 1986 (i.e. after the onset of his amnesia). AC's knowledge was assessed by asking him to give, for each word, its definition (word-definition task), the general domain Io which the word belonged ('domain' task), and to generate a sentence containing the word (sentence-generation task). Finally, we administered a recognition task in which AC had to select, for each word, its correct definition amongst four definitions. For all of these tasks, the results showed that AG's performance was similar to that of four control subjects matched for age, education, and profession. In particular, there was no difference with regard to AC's knowledge of words entered into the language after the onset of his amnesia. Therefore, these results indicate that, despite his profound amnesia, AC was able to learn normally new vocabulary words. More generally, they confirm that, at least is some cases, semantic learning can be spared in amnesia. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration des troubles attentionnels consécutifs à un traumatisme crânien léger
Marique, Patricia; Catale, Corinne ULg; Closset, Annette et al

in Revue de Neuropsychologie (2001), 11

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See detailDeep dysphasia : Further evidence on the relationship between phonological short-term memory and language processing impairments
Majerus, Steve ULg; Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2001), 18(5), 385-410

We report a cognitive investigation of a case of deep dysphasia appearing in the context of primary progressive aphasia. Over a period of 5 years, patient CO presented progressive difficulties in word ... [more ▼]

We report a cognitive investigation of a case of deep dysphasia appearing in the context of primary progressive aphasia. Over a period of 5 years, patient CO presented progressive difficulties in word finding and in oral comprehension, while nonverbal cognitive functions remained preserved. As in other deep dysphasic patients, CO's repetition performance showed marked imageability and lexicality effects, and semantic paraphasias. The same effects were observed in writing-to-dictation. Regularisation errors occurred in word reading. CO's short-term memory span was less than two words. A cognitive analysis of language processing revealed difficulties in phoneme identification and rhyme judgement, in detecting grammatical class for orally presented words, and in oral and written naming. The interpretation of CO's deep dysphasic symptoms within interactive models of language processing confirmed the importance of a phonological short-term storage impairment as an explanatory factor of deep dysphasia. [less ▲]

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See detailLes troubles des fonctions exécutives dans la maladie d'Alzheimer
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Alzheimer Actualités (2001), (155), 6-9

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See detailExperience-dependent changes in cerebral functional connectivity during human rapid eye movement sleep
Laureys, Steven ULg; Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2001), 105(3), 521-525

One function of sleep is hypothesized to be the reprocessing and consolidation of memory traces (Smith, 1995; Gais et al., 2000; McGaugh, 2000; Stickgold et al., 2000). At the cellular level, neuronal ... [more ▼]

One function of sleep is hypothesized to be the reprocessing and consolidation of memory traces (Smith, 1995; Gais et al., 2000; McGaugh, 2000; Stickgold et al., 2000). At the cellular level, neuronal reactivations during post-training sleep in animals have been observed in hippocampal (Wilson and McNaughton, 1994) and cortical (Amzica et al., 1997) neuronal populations. At the systems level, using positron emission tomography, we have recently shown that some brain areas reactivated during rapid-eye-movement sleep in human subjects previously trained on an implicit learning task (a serial reaction time task) (Maquet et al., 2000). These cortical reactivations, located in the left premotor area and bilateral cuneus, were thought to reflect the reprocessing - possibly the consolidation - of memory traces during post-training rapid-eye-movement sleep. Here, the experience-dependent functional connectivity of these brain regions is examined. It is shown that the left premotor cortex is functionally more correlated with the left posterior parietal cortex and bilateral pre-supplementary motor area during rapid-eye-movement sleep of subjects previously trained to the reaction time task compared to rapid-eye-movement sleep of untrained subjects. The increase in functional connectivity during post-training rapid-eye-movement sleep suggests that the brain areas reactivated during post-training rapid-eye-movement sleep participate in the optimization of the network that subtends subject's visuo-motor response. The optimization of this visuo-motor network during sleep could explain the gain in performance observed during the following day. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a test battery for assessing cognitive functions of elderly patients with Down syndrome
Georges, Michel ULg; Thewis, B.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Revue de Neuropsychologie (2001), 11(4), 549-579

Post-mortem studies of Down syndrome (DS) individuals older than 35 years show that almost 100% of them develop the neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD). A test battery designed to assess ... [more ▼]

Post-mortem studies of Down syndrome (DS) individuals older than 35 years show that almost 100% of them develop the neuropathological symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD). A test battery designed to assess several domains of cognition was administered to a group of 12 DS individuals older than 35 years. It proved sensitive to individual differences and thus appears to be appropriate for the observation of cognitive change linked to age. Statistical analyses do not reveal cognitive changes in the DS subjects after one year time. However qualitative analyses of individual profiles suggest a cognitive decline in one subject. Additionally, in a PET-scan examination, three subjects present a mild decrease in cerebral glucose metabolism similar to that usually observed in AD. An AD diagnostic though remains uncertain at this stage. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationships between executive dysfunction and frontal hypometabolism in Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Delrue, Gaël ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Brain & Cognition (2001), 47(1/2), 272-275

A serie of tasks assessing executive functions was administered to patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. Two groups of Alzheimer patients were examined : patients with hypometabolism ... [more ▼]

A serie of tasks assessing executive functions was administered to patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. Two groups of Alzheimer patients were examined : patients with hypometabolism restricted to the posterior (temporal and parietal) cerebral areas and patients with hypometabolism in both posterior and anterior (frontal) cerebral areas. The performance of Alzheimer patients was inferior to control subjects on all executive tasks. However, the two groups of Alzheimer patients did not differ from each other on all tasks except one. These data indicate that frontal lobe hypometabolism is not necessary to produce executive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, executive dysfunction could be the consequence of a disconnection process between posterior and anterior cerebral areas; [less ▲]

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See detailFurther investigation of the supervisory attentional system in schizophrenia: Planning, inhibition, and rule abstraction
Marczewski, P.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2001), 6(3), 175-192

Investigated supervisory attentional system (SAS) functions in schizophrenic patients. 15 schizophrenic outpatients (mean age 29.93 yrs) and 15 normal controls matched for age, gender, and educational ... [more ▼]

Investigated supervisory attentional system (SAS) functions in schizophrenic patients. 15 schizophrenic outpatients (mean age 29.93 yrs) and 15 normal controls matched for age, gender, and educational level were compared. Three tasks (Tower of London, Hayling, and Brixton tests) were used to examine 3 executive processes (planning, inhibition, and rule detection). Schizophrenic patients performed significantly worse than normal controls on all 3 tasks. In addition, patients' performances on selected measures of the three tests were correlated, even when age and medication were partialled out. It is concluded that patients are impaired on all SAS functions. The possible role of a general impairment (processing speed or cognitive resources) is discussed [less ▲]

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