References of "Van der Linden, Martial"
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See detailEffect of manipulation and irrelevant noise on working memory capacity of patients with Alzheimer's dementia
Belleville, Sylvie; Rouleau, Nancy; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Neuropsychology (2003), 17(1), 69-81

The effect of manipulation and distracting noise on immediate serial recall was measured in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), neurologically healthy elderly individuals and young adults ... [more ▼]

The effect of manipulation and distracting noise on immediate serial recall was measured in patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), neurologically healthy elderly individuals and young adults. In experiment 1, the authors compared serial word recall with word recall in alphabetical order. Alphabetical recall requires the active manipulation of the contents of working memory. Findings indicated that DAT patients were severely impaired in the alphabetical recall task, whereas the performance of neurologically healthy elderly participants was comparable with the performance of young adult participants. In experiment 2, the authors investigated the effect of different irrelevant auditory backgrounds on immediate digit recall. In this task, both elderly participants and DAT patients performed similarly to the group of young adult participants, indicating comparable efficacy to resist auditory distraction. [less ▲]

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See detailUne approche neuropsychologique des relations entre mémoire épisodique et mémoire sémantique
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Revue de Neuropsychologie (2003), 13(1), 3-69

Cognitive models of the organization of memory propose different conceptions of the relationships between episodic and semantic memory. In the present review, we consider two influential models. According ... [more ▼]

Cognitive models of the organization of memory propose different conceptions of the relationships between episodic and semantic memory. In the present review, we consider two influential models. According to one model (Tulving, 1995), episodic and semantic memory are two functionally and anatomically distinct systems. Their relationships are referred to as “embeddedness”, that is, information must be encoded in semantic memory in order to achieve episodic memory. Another model (Squire & Zola, 1998) describes episodic and semantic memory as two subsystems of declarative memory. Both depend on the same brain region and should be impaired in amnesic patients. Furthermore, information is usually first encoded in episodic memory, before being transferred to semantic memory. In this review, we describe the neuropsychological data that support each model, as well as studies that contradict these models. Three sets of evidence are described. First, we consider recognition memory in amnesic patients. Recognition memory processes, recollection and familiarity, have been related to episodic and semantic memory, respectively (Tulving, 1995). Contradictory findings exist concerning the relative preservation of familiarity-based recognition in certain types of amnesic patients. Then we describe studies that have examined whether amnesic patients can learn new semantic information or not. Finally, episodic learning in semantic dementia is considered. [less ▲]

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See detailEmotional Processing in Down Syndrome
Catale, Corinne ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Meulemans, Thierry ULg et al

in Books of Abstracts: 13th conference of the European Society for Cognitive Psychology (2003)

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes ... [more ▼]

In addition to mental retardation, Down Syndrome (DS) children present emotional deficits. Some authors have suggested that the emotional deficits observed in DS can be related to developmental changes. However, the link between emotion and cognitive processing remains unclear.This study aims to assess the relationships between emotional and cognitive processing in DS children. More specifically, we wanted to assess whether cognitive development could predict emotional deficits. Eighteen children DS and 18 chronological age-matched (CA) children were presented with emotional tasks designed to tap their abilities (i) to label emotion through emotional faces and prosody, (ii) to attribute, from stories, cognitive and emotional states to characters and (iii) to process face identity and gaze behaviour. Cognitive functioning was assessed including attentional treatment, visuo-spatial working memory, receptive language and logical reasoning. The results confirmed that DS performed worse on both cognitive and emotional tasks than CA children. There are also strong correlations between cognitive (including language and logical reasoning measures) and emotional measures. These results suggest that emotional troubles in DS are related to their global cognitive development; they also suggest that the degree of mental retardation can predict the importance of emotional deficits in DS. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain correlates of performance in a free/cued recall task with semantic encoding in Alzheimer disease
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Chicherio, C. et al

in Alzheimer Disease and Associated Disorders (2003), 17(1), 35-45

The goal of this study was to explore in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) the brain correlates of free and cued recall performance using an adaptation of the procedure developed by Grober and ... [more ▼]

The goal of this study was to explore in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) the brain correlates of free and cued recall performance using an adaptation of the procedure developed by Grober and Buschke (1987). This procedure, which ensures semantic processing and coordinates encoding and retrieval, has been shown to be very sensitive to an early diagnosis of AD. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99) was used to establish clinicometabolic correlations between performance at free and cued verbal recall and resting brain metabolism in 31 patients with AD. Results showed that patient's score on free recall correlated with metabolic activity in right frontal regions (BA 10 and BA 45), suggesting that performance reflected a strategic retrieval attempt. Poor retrieval performance was tentatively attributed to a loss of functional correlation between frontal and medial temporal regions in patients with AD compared with elderly controls. Performance on cued recall was correlated to residual metabolic activity in bilateral parahippocampal regions (BA 36), suggesting that performance reflected retrieval of semantic associations, without recollection in AD. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the diagnostic sensitivity for Alzheimer's disease of the cued recall performance in the Grober and Buschke procedure (1987) depends on the activity of parahippocampal regions, one of the earliest targets of the disease. Moreover, the results suggest that the poor performance of patients with AD during free and cued recall is related to a decreased connectivity between parahippocampal regions and frontal areas. [less ▲]

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See detailAlzheimer' Disease as a Disconnection Syndrome?
Delbeuck, Xavier; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg

in Neuropsychology Review (2003), 13(2), 79-92

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See detailThe contribution of recollection and familiarity to recognition memory : A study of the effects of test format and aging
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Neuropsychology (2003), 17(1), 14-24

Whether the format of a recognition memory task influences the contribution of recollection and familiarity to performance is a matter of debate. The authors investigated this issue by comparing the ... [more ▼]

Whether the format of a recognition memory task influences the contribution of recollection and familiarity to performance is a matter of debate. The authors investigated this issue by comparing the performance of 64 young (mean age = 21.7 years; mean education = 14.5 years) and 62 older participants (mean age = 64.4 years; mean education = 14.2 years) on a yes–no and a forced-choice recognition task for unfamiliar faces using the remember– know–guess procedure. Familiarity contributed more to forced-choice than to yes–no performance. Moreover, older participants, who showed a decrease in recollection together with an increase in familiarity, performed better on the forced-choice task than on the yes–no task, whereas younger participants showed the opposite pattern. [less ▲]

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See detailCognitive intervention
Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Juillerat, Anne-Claude; Adam, Stéphane ULg

in Mulligan, Reinhild; Van der Linden, Martial; Juillerat, Anne-Claude (Eds.) The clinical management of early Alzheimer's disease: A handbook (2003)

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See detailA cognitive neuropsychological approach to Alzheimer's disease
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Juillerat, Anne-Claude et al

in Mulligan, Reinhild; Van der Linden, Martial; Juillerat, Anne-Claude (Eds.) Clinical management of Alzheimer's disease (2003)

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See detailThe neural substrates of the central executive: Exploration of the updating and shifting processes
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Delchambre, Marie et al

Conference (2002, December)

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See detailExploring the effect of action familiarity on SPTs recall performance in Alzheimer's disease
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Moonen, Gustave ULg et al

in Journal of Clinical & Experimental Neuropsychology (2002), 24(8), 1057-1069

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and ... [more ▼]

This study examined the performance of normal controls (NC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients on free recall, semantic cued recall and object cued recall of both subject-performed tasks (SPTs) and verbal descriptions of actions, by controlling familiarity of actions associated to objects. The results showed that both groups performed better after SPT encoding than after verbal encoding. in all three types of recall. In addition, this SPT advantage was greater for AD patients than for NC in the object cued recall test, emphasizing AD patients' sensibility to the congruence of cues between encoding and retrieval conditions. Following verbal encoding. NC showed a better recall for less familiar actions than for highly familiar actions, whereas AD patients exhibited the opposite pattern. These results reflect that AD patients did not benefit from a distinctiveness effect at encoding for improving subsequent retrieval of verbal information, probably due to a reduced level of elaboration during encoding. However, there was no effect of action familiarity on recall performance by both groups following SPT encoding. These results suggest that memory for verbal actions and SPTs is governed by different principles. In addition. they demonstrate the robustness of the SPT effect in AD patients, who were able to improve memory performance in the SPT condition not only with highly familiar actions but also with less familiar actions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural substrates of the central executive: Exploration of the updating and shifting processes
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Delchambre, Marie et al

Conference (2002, September)

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See detailTraining early Alzheimer patients to use a mobile phone
Lekeu, Françoise ULg; Wojtasik, Vinciane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2002), 102(3), 114-121

The mobile phone may be useful to keep in contact with spatially disoriented and memory impaired patients. In keeping with this idea, this study describes the training program developed to teach two ... [more ▼]

The mobile phone may be useful to keep in contact with spatially disoriented and memory impaired patients. In keeping with this idea, this study describes the training program developed to teach two patients with mild Alzheimer's disease (CI and ML) how to use their own mobile phone. Each training session was divided into two parts. In the first part, the spaced-retrieval technique was used to promote the consultation of a card pasted on the back of the phone. The card detailed each stage of phone utilization and which keys had to be pressed to call somebody. In the second part, the patients received repetitive exercises of calling based upon the errorless learning principle. At the end of three-months rehabilitation, the results showed different learning patterns for the patients. ML needed more spaced-retrieval sessions to spontaneously consult the card and to correctly use the phone, compared to CI However, by the repetition of calling exercises, both patients showed a decrease of instruction card consultation, whereas they were still able to correctly call somebody. This learning ability is hypothesized to be a consequence of a relatively preserved procedural memory in both patients. In conclusion, this study highlights the effectiveness of combined specific learning techniques for improving AD patient's autonomy in daily life activities. [less ▲]

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See detailA PET investigation of lexicality and phonotactic frequency in oral language processing
Majerus, Steve ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2002), 19(4), 343-360

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to ... [more ▼]

Lexicality and phonotactic frequency effects are observed in many cognitive studies on language processing, but little is known about their underlying neural substrates, especially with regard to phonotactic frequency effects. Here, we conducted a positron emission tomography (PET) study in which 11 right-handed volunteers had either to repeat or to listen to lists of words, high phonotactic frequency nonwords, and low phonotactic frequency nonwords. The comparison of word versus nonword processing consistently confirmed previous findings of left temporal and prefrontal activations classically ascribed to lexicosemantic processing. Higher activation was found in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus when comparing high phonotactic frequency nonwords to words, but not when comparing low phonotactic frequency nonwords to words. We propose that this region is implicated in the formation of temporary phonological representations for high-probability phonological events, which may support processing of high phonotactic frequency nonwords [less ▲]

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See detailPréservation de la reconnaissance basée sur la familiarité chez un patient amnésique
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Charnallet, Annick et al

Poster (2002, May 24)

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See detailBrain imaging of the central executive component of working memory
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews (2002), 26(2), 105-125

This review presents neuroimaging studies which have explored the cerebral substrates of the central executive component of the working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch [working memory (1986 ... [more ▼]

This review presents neuroimaging studies which have explored the cerebral substrates of the central executive component of the working memory model proposed by Baddeley and Hitch [working memory (1986); Recent advances in learning and motivation (1974)]. These studies have demonstrated that different executive functions (manipulating and updating of information, dual-task coordination, inhibition and shifting processes) not only recruit various frontal areas, but also depend upon posterior (mainly parietal) regions. Such results are in agreement with the hypothesis that executive functions rely on a distributed cerebral network not restricted to anterior cerebral areas. Moreover, the intervention of similar prefrontal regions in a large number of executive tasks suggests that the central executive functioning must be understood in terms of different interactions between a network of regions rather than in terms of a specific association between one region and one higher-level cognitive process [less ▲]

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See detailNormal mere exposure effect with impaired recognition in Alzheimer's disease
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2002), 38(1), 77-86

We investigated the mere exposure effect and the explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and elderly control subjects, using unfamiliar faces. During the exposure phase, the subjects ... [more ▼]

We investigated the mere exposure effect and the explicit memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and elderly control subjects, using unfamiliar faces. During the exposure phase, the subjects estimated the age of briefly flashed faces. The mere exposure effect was examined by presenting pairs of faces (old and new) and asking participants to select the face they liked. The participants were then presented with a forced-choice explicit recognition task. Controls subjects exhibited above-chance preference and recognition scores for old faces. The AD patients also showed the mere exposure effect but no explicit recognition. These results suggest that the processes involved in the mere exposure effect are preserved in AD patients despite their impaired explicit recognition. The results are discussed in terms of Seamon et al.'s (1995) proposal that processes involved in the mere exposure effect are equivalent to those subserving perceptual priming. These processes would depend on extrastriate areas which are relatively preserved in AD patients. [less ▲]

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