References of "Van der Linden, Martial"
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See detailMemory for temporal context : Effects of aging, encoding instructions and retrieval strategies
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Memory (2005), 13(1), 95-109

Young and older adults were compared on a list discrimination task. In Experiment 1, performance declined with aging after incidental and intentional encoding of the temporal context. Moreover, there was ... [more ▼]

Young and older adults were compared on a list discrimination task. In Experiment 1, performance declined with aging after incidental and intentional encoding of the temporal context. Moreover, there was no benefit for intentional encoding in either group. In Experiment 2, each list was associated with a different encoding context. There were age differences in performance when participants tried to retrieve the encoding context of the items as a cue for their list of occurrence, but not when participants evaluated temporal distance from the strength of the memory trace. This suggests that the age-related decrease in list discrimination could be at least partly due to a difficulty to infer strategically the temporal context of the items from information encoded in the same time. [less ▲]

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See detailLa mémoire de travail
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Gély-Nargeot, Marie-Christine; Ergis, Anne-Marie; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Les troubles de la mémoire dans la maladie d'Alzheimer (2005)

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See detailPhenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories for emotional and neutral events in older and younger adults
Comblain, Christine; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Experimental Aging Research (2005), 31(2), 173-189

The authors investigated age-related differences in phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories for positive, negative, and neutral events. Younger and older participants were asked to recall ... [more ▼]

The authors investigated age-related differences in phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories for positive, negative, and neutral events. Younger and older participants were asked to recall two specific memories of each type and then to rate their memories on several sensorial ( e. g., visual, taste) and contextual ( e. g., location, time) characteristics. The authors found that emotional ( both positive and negative) memories contained more sensorial and contextual details than neutral memories in both age groups, whereas positive and negative memories did not differ on most dimensions. In addition, negative memories were associated with a higher intensity of positive feelings and a reduced complexity of storyline in older as compared to younger adults. These results suggest that the effect of emotion on phenomenal characteristics of autobiographical memories is similar in younger and older adults, but that older adults tend to reappraise negative events in a more positive light than younger adults. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of automatic memory during general anesthesia for elective surgery using the process dissociation procedure
Willems, Sylvie ULg; Iselin-Chaves, Irène A.; Jermann, Françoise J. et al

in Anesthesiology (2005), 103

Background: This prospective study evaluated memory function during general anesthesia for elective surgery and its relation to depth of hypnotic state. The authors also compared memory function in ... [more ▼]

Background: This prospective study evaluated memory function during general anesthesia for elective surgery and its relation to depth of hypnotic state. The authors also compared memory function in anesthetized and nonanesthetized subjects. Methods: Words were played for 70 min via headphones to 48 patients (aged 18–70 yr) after induction of general anesthesia for elective surgery. Patients were unpremedicated, and the anesthetic regimen was free. The Bispectral Index (BIS) was recorded throughout the study. Within 36 h after the word presentation, memory was assessed using an auditory word stem completion test with inclusion and exclusion instructions. Memory performance and the contribution of explicit and implicit memory were calculated using the process dissociation procedure. The authors applied the same memory task to a control group of nonanesthetized subjects. Results: Forty-seven patients received isoflurane, and one patient received propofol for anesthesia. The mean ( SD) BIS was 49 9. There was evidence of memory for words presented during light (BIS 61–80) and adequate anesthesia (BIS 41–60) but not during deep anesthesia (BIS 21–40). The process dissociation procedure showed a significant implicit memory contribution but not reliable explicit memory contribution (mean explicit memory scores 0.05 0.14, 0.04 0.09, and 0.05 0.14; mean automatic influence scores 0.14 0.12, 0.17 0.17, and 0.18 0.21 at BIS 21–40, 41–60, and 61–80, respectively). Compared with anesthetized patients, the memory performance of nonanesthetized subjects was better, with a higher contribution by explicit memory and a comparable contribution by implicit memory. Conclusion: During general anesthesia for elective surgery, implicit memory persists even in adequate hypnotic states, to a comparable degree as in nonanesthetized subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailMetacognitions in proneness towards hallucinations and delusions
Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Behaviour research and therapy (2005), 43(11), 1425-1441

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See detailSource monitoring for actions in hallucination proneness
Laroi, Frank ULg; Collignon, O.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Cognitive Neuropsychiatry (2005), 10

INTRODUCTION: In the present study we explored the role of cognitive factors in hallucinatory proneness by utilising an incidental source monitoring task consisting of actions. METHOD: A total of 65 ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: In the present study we explored the role of cognitive factors in hallucinatory proneness by utilising an incidental source monitoring task consisting of actions. METHOD: A total of 65 normal subjects were administered a source monitoring task and were asked either to: (1) perform the action; (2) watch the experimenter perform the action; (3) imagine him/herself performing the action; (4) imagine the experimenter performing the action; (5) or listen to the experimenter say the action verbally. Following a delay, actions were presented consisting of those already presented in one of the 5 conditions (old), and those never before presented (new). For each action, subjects were required to identify if the action was old or new. If the action was identified as old, subjects were required to identify the source of the word (i.e., one of the 5 conditions). Subjects also completed a questionnaire assessing metacognitive beliefs. Subjects were grouped according to their scores on a revised and elaborated version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale (LSHS). Those with scores within the top 25% were included in the hallucination-prone group (HP) (n = 16), whereas scores within the lower 25% were included in the nonhallucination-prone group (NHP) (n = 16). RESULTS: Within the internal conditions, hallucination-prone subjects confused two internal sources (a specific internal-internal source discrimination error). That is, for imagined actions where the subjects performed the action, HP subjects erroneously attributed these towards an imagined action performed by the experimenter. Results also revealed that hallucination-proneness was associated with metacognitive beliefs. Finally, there was a significant relation between certain metacognitive beliefs and the internal-internal source discrimination error on the source monitoring task. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from the present study suggest that an important cognitive deficit in the genesis of hallucinations may be a perturbation in the control of interna [less ▲]

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See detailAssociations between hallucinations and personality structure in a non-clinical sample : comparison between young and elderly samples
Laroi, Frank ULg; DeFruyt, F.; van Os, J. et al

in Personality and Individual Differences (2005), 39(1), 189-200

Few studies have explored the prevalence of hallucinations in the non-clinical, elderly population. Also, the association between personality structure and hallucinations remains poorly investigated. The ... [more ▼]

Few studies have explored the prevalence of hallucinations in the non-clinical, elderly population. Also, the association between personality structure and hallucinations remains poorly investigated. The aims of the present study were twofold. First, to explore the influence of age on the prevalence of hallucination-proneness, and second, to examine the association between personality and hallucination-proneness in young and elderly subjects. A sample of young (n = 230) and elderly adults (n = 183) completed an elaborated and validated version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale (LSHS; Laroi, Marczewski, & Van der Linden, 2004) and the Five Factor Inventory version of the NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-FFI; Costa, [less ▲]

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See detailDissociation between recall and recognition memory in amnesia: The case of a patient with hippocampal damage following carbon monoxide poisoning
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Charnallet, Annik et al

in Proceedings of the Joint Mid-year meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society, the Division of Neuropsychology of the British Psychological Society and the British Neuropsychological Society (2005)

There is currently a debate regarding the status of recall and recognition memory in amnesic patients with focal hippocampal damage. Proportionate deficits of recall and recognition memory have been ... [more ▼]

There is currently a debate regarding the status of recall and recognition memory in amnesic patients with focal hippocampal damage. Proportionate deficits of recall and recognition memory have been observed in some patients with selective hippocampal damage. In addition, these patients showed an impairment of both the recollection and familiarity aspects of recognition memory. In contrast, other amnesic patients with selective hippocampal lesions demonstrated relatively preserved recognition memory, despite severely impaired recall abilities. In some of them, familiarity processes were found to be intact. The resolution of this controversy has important implications for theories of episodic memory. In the present study, we examined the recall and recognition performance of an amnesic patient, MR, who suffered from bilateral hippocampal damage and temporoparietal cortical atrophy following carbon monoxide poisoning. Verbal and nonverbal recall and recognition memory were measured by tasks matched for difficulty. On these tasks, MR’s recall performance was more severely impaired than his recognition memory. In addition, MR’s recognition performance was normal on most of the tasks. In order to determine on which processes MR based his recognition decisions, we administered to the patient and to matched controls the process dissociation procedure. This evaluates the contribution of recollection and familiarity within a recognition task. The results indicated that, in this patient, familiarity was preserved, but recollection was impaired. This study thus supports the idea that amnesic patients with hippocampal damage can show preserved familiarity-based recognition memory, despite poor recall and recollection. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire du contexte temporel: Effets du vieillissement, des instructions d'encodage et des stratégies de récupération
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Taconnat, Laurence; Vanneste, Sandrine; Isingrini, Michel (Eds.) Manifestations cognition du vieillissement psychologique (2005)

We explored the effects of aging on memory for the temporal context, assessed by a list discrimination task with unfamiliar faces. In a first experiment, we compared incidental and intentional encoding of ... [more ▼]

We explored the effects of aging on memory for the temporal context, assessed by a list discrimination task with unfamiliar faces. In a first experiment, we compared incidental and intentional encoding of the temporal context in young and older adults. The results indicated that list discrimination performance declines with aging. Moreover, intentional encoding of the temporal context does not improve performance of neither group, compared to incidental encoding. In a second experiment, each list was associated with a different encoding context. The results showed age differences on list discrimination performance when participants tried to remember the encoding context of the items as a cue to retrieve their list of occurrence. However, there is no age difference when participants relied on some other processes, mainly involving the assessment of the strength of the memory for the item. The difficulty of older adults to use a reconstruction process may be partly due to a less efficient encoding of the contextual information necessary to reconstruct the temporal context of the event. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenomenal characteristics associated with projecting oneself back into the past and forward into the future: Influence of valence and temporal distance
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Consciousness & Cognition (2004), 13(4), 844-858

As humans, we frequently engage in mental time travel, reliving past experiences and imagining possible future events. This study examined whether similar factors affect the subjective experience ... [more ▼]

As humans, we frequently engage in mental time travel, reliving past experiences and imagining possible future events. This study examined whether similar factors affect the subjective experience associated with remembering the past and imagining the future. Participants mentally "re-experienced" or "pre-experienced" positive and negative events that differed in their temporal distance from the present (close versus distant), and then rated the phenomenal characteristics (i.e., sensorial, contextual, and emotional details) associated with their representations. For both past and future, representations of positive events were associated with a greater feeling of re-experiencing (or pre-experiencing) than representations of negative events. In addition, representations of temporally close events (both past and future) contained more sensorial and contextual details, and generated a stronger feeling of re-experiencing (or pre-experiencing) than representations of temporally distant events. It is suggested that the way we both remember our past and imagine our future is constrained by our current goals. (C) 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of ageing on the recollection of emotional and neutral pictures
Comblain, Christine; D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Memory (2004), 12(6), 673-684

This study investigated age-related differences in recognition memory for emotional and neutral pictures. Younger and older participants were asked to rate pictures according to their emotional valence ... [more ▼]

This study investigated age-related differences in recognition memory for emotional and neutral pictures. Younger and older participants were asked to rate pictures according to their emotional valence, arousal, and visual complexity. Two weeks later they had to recognise these pictures and the states of awareness associated with memory were assessed with the "remember/know/guess" paradigm. We found that, although the influence of emotion on recognition accuracy (as assessed by d') was similar in both age groups, the tendency for positive and negative pictures to create a rich recollective experience was weaker in older adults. In addition., "remember" responses were more often based on a recollection of emotional reactions in older than in younger participants. We suggest that the elderly tend to focus on their feelings when confronted with emotional pictures, which could have impaired their memory for the contextual information associated with these stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentity but not expression memory for unfamiliar faces is affected by ageing
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Memory (2004), 12(5), 644-654

We examined age-related differences in memory for identity and emotional expression of unfamiliar faces. Younger and older adults were presented with happy and angry faces and were later asked to ... [more ▼]

We examined age-related differences in memory for identity and emotional expression of unfamiliar faces. Younger and older adults were presented with happy and angry faces and were later asked to recognise the same faces displaying a neutral expression. When a face was recognised, they also had to remember what the initial expression of the face had been. In addition, states of awareness associated with both identity and expression memory were assessed with the remember/know/guess paradigm. Older adults showed less recollective experience than younger adults for identity but not for emotional expressions of the faces. This evidence indicates that age-related differences in memory may depend on the nature of the to-be-remembered information, with emotional/social information being remembered as well in older as in younger adults. [less ▲]

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See detailCan phonological and semantic short-term memory be dissociated ? Further evidence from Landau-Kleffner syndrome
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg et al

in Cognitive Neuropsychology (2004), 21(5), 491-512

Recent studies have made a distinction between short-term storage capacities for phonological information and short-term storage capacities for lexico-semantic information (R. Martin, Lesch,

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See detailInfluence of affective meaning on memory for contextual information
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Emotion (Washington, D.C.) (2004), 4(2), 173-188

In 4 experiments, the authors investigated the influence of the affective meaning of words on memory for 2 kinds of contextual features that differ in the amount of effortful processes they require to be ... [more ▼]

In 4 experiments, the authors investigated the influence of the affective meaning of words on memory for 2 kinds of contextual features that differ in the amount of effortful processes they require to be encoded in memory (i.e., color and spatial location). The main results showed that memory for color, in which words were typed, was better for emotional than for neutral words, but only when color information was learned incidentally. In contrast, spatial location of the words was better remembered for emotional than for neutral words whatever the encoding conditions (intentional vs. incidental). It is suggested that the influence of affective meaning on context memory may involve an automatic attraction of attention to contextual features associated with emotional words. [less ▲]

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See detailImaging a cognitive model of apraxia: The neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes
Peigneux, Philippe ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Garraux, Gaëtan ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2004), 21(3), 119-142

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using (H2O)-O-15 PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis. of the visual analysis of gestures. First; we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture mutation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;35.63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of aging on location-based and distance-based processes in memory for time
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Michel, Anne-Pascale et al

in Acta Psychologica (2004), 116

Retrieving when an event occurred may depend on an estimation of the age of the event (distance-based processes) or on strategic reconstruction processes based on contextual information associated with ... [more ▼]

Retrieving when an event occurred may depend on an estimation of the age of the event (distance-based processes) or on strategic reconstruction processes based on contextual information associated with the event (location-based processes). Young and older participants performed a list discrimination task that has been designed to dissociate the contribution of both types of processes. An adapted Remember/Know/Guess procedure [Can. J. Exp. Psychol. 50 (1996) 114] was developed to evaluate the processes used by the participants to recognize the stimuli and retrieve their list of occurrence. The results showed that aging disrupts location- based processes more than distance-based processes. In addition, a limitation of speed of processing and working-memory capacities was the main predictor of age-related differences on location-based processes, whereas working-memory capacities mediated partly age differences on distance-based processes. [less ▲]

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See detailSouvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés et faux souvenirs
Brédart, Serge ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

Book published by Solal (2004)

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See detailPréambule
Meulemans, Thierry ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Meulemans, Thierry; Collette, Fabienne; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Neuropsychologie des fonctions exécutives (2004)

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See detailDissociation between recall and recognition memory performance in an amnesic patient with hippocampal damage following carbon monoxide poisoning.
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Charnallet, Annik et al

in Neurocase : Case Studies in Neuropsychology, Neuropsychiatry & Behavioural Neurology (2004), 10(4), 330-344

Some patients with relatively selective hippocampal damage have shown proportionate recall and recognition deficits. Moreover, familiarity as well as recollection have been found to be impaired in some of ... [more ▼]

Some patients with relatively selective hippocampal damage have shown proportionate recall and recognition deficits. Moreover, familiarity as well as recollection have been found to be impaired in some of these patients. In contrast, other patients with apparently similar damage presented with relatively preserved recognition despite having severely impaired recall, and some of these patients have been shown to have preserved familiarity. We report here the case of an amnesic patient who suffered bilateral hippocampal damage and temporoparietal atrophy after carbon monoxide poisoning. On tests matched for difficulty, his recall performance was more severely impaired than his recognition memory, for verbal as well as for visual materials. Moreover, he performed within the range of healthy matched subjects on nine recognition tests out of ten. In a task using the process dissociation procedure, the patient’s familiarity was preserved although his recollection was impaired. These findings indicate that recall and recognition memory can be dissociated in amnesic patients with hippocampal lesions even when temporoparietal cortical atrophy is also present. [less ▲]

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See detailNeuropsychologie des faux souvenirs
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Brédart, Serge; Van der Linden, Martial (Eds.) Souvenirs récupérés, souvenirs oubliés, et faux souvenirs (2004)

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