References of "Van der Linden, Martial"
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See detailExploration of the neural substrates of executive functioning by functional neuroimaging
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Hogge, Michaël; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Neuroscience (2006), 139(1), 209-221

This review presents neuroimaging studies that have explored the cerebral substrates of executive functioning. These studies have demonstrated that different executive functions not only recruit various ... [more ▼]

This review presents neuroimaging studies that have explored the cerebral substrates of executive functioning. These studies have demonstrated that different executive functions not only recruit various frontal areas but also depend upon posterior (mainly parietal) regions. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis that executive functioning relies on a distributed cerebral network that is not restricted to anterior cerebral areas. However, there exists an important heterogeneity in the cerebral areas associated with these different processes, and also between different tasks assessing the same process. Since these discrepant results could be due to the paradigms used (subtraction designs), recent results obtained with conjunction and interaction analyses are presented, which confirm the role of parietal areas in executive functioning and also demonstrate the existence of some specificity in the neural substrates of the executive processes of updating, shifting and inhibition. Finally, functional magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the activity in cerebral areas involved in executive tasks can be transient or sustained. Consequently, to better characterize the functional role of areas associated with executive functioning, it is important to take into account not only the localization of cerebral activity but also the temporal pattern of this activity. [less ▲]

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See detailRelations between vocabulary development and verbal short-term memory: The relative importance of short-term memory for serial order and item information
Majerus, Steve ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg; Greffe, C. et al

in Journal of Experimental Child Psychology (2006), 93(2), 95-119

Although many studies have shown an association between verbal short-term memory (STM) and vocabulary development, the precise nature of this association is not yet clear. The current study reexamined ... [more ▼]

Although many studies have shown an association between verbal short-term memory (STM) and vocabulary development, the precise nature of this association is not yet clear. The current study reexamined this relation in 4- to 6-year-olds by designing verbal STM tasks that maximized memory for either item or serial order information. Although empirical data suggest that distinct STM processes determine item and serial order recall, these were generally confounded in previous developmental studies. We observed that item and order memory tasks were independently related to vocabulary development. Furthermore, vocabulary development was more strongly associated with STM for order information in 4- and 6-year-olds and with STM for item information in 5-year-olds. These data highlight the specificity of verbal STM for serial order and item information and suggest a causal association between order STM processes and vocabulary development, at least in 4- and 6-year-olds. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailVariability in the impairments of recognition memory in patients with frontal lobe lesions
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Lekeu, Françoise ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2006), 42(7), 971-1058

Fourteen patients with frontal lobe lesions and 14 normal subjects were tested on a recognition memory task that required discriminating between target words, new words that are synonyms of the targets ... [more ▼]

Fourteen patients with frontal lobe lesions and 14 normal subjects were tested on a recognition memory task that required discriminating between target words, new words that are synonyms of the targets and unrelated distractors. A deficit was found in 12 of the patients. Moreover, three different patterns of recognition impairment were identified: (I) poor memory for targets, (II) normal hits but increased false recognitions for both types of distractors, (III) normal hit rates, but increased false recognitions for synonyms only. Differences in terms of location of the damage and behavioural characteristics between these subgroups were examined. An encoding deficit was proposed to explain the performance of patients in subgroup I. The behavioral patterns of the patients in subgroups II and III could be interpreted as deficient postretrieval verification processes and an inability to recollect item-specific information, respectively. [less ▲]

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See detailThe left intraparietal sulcus and verbal short-term memory: Focus of attention or serial order ?
Majerus, Steve ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Neuroimage (2006), 32(2), 880-891

One of the most consistently activated regions during verbal short-term memory (STM) tasks is the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS). However, its precise role remains a matter of debate. While some authors ... [more ▼]

One of the most consistently activated regions during verbal short-term memory (STM) tasks is the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS). However, its precise role remains a matter of debate. While some authors consider the IPS to be a specific store for serial order information, other data suggest that it serves a more general function of attentional focalization. In the current fMRI experiment, we investigated these two hypotheses by presenting different verbal STM conditions that probed recognition for word identity or word order and by assessing functional connectivity of the left IPS with distant brain areas. If the IPS has a role of attentional focalization, then it should be involved in both order and item conditions, but it should be connected to different brain regions, depending on the neural substrates involved in processing the different types of information (order versus phonological/orthographic) to be remembered in the item and order STM conditions. We observed that the left IPS was activated in both order and item STM conditions but for different reasons: during order STM, the left IPS was functionally connected to serial/temporal order processing areas in the right IPS, premotor and cerebellar cortices, while during item STM, the left IPS was connected to phonological and orthographic processing areas in the superior temporal and fusiform gyri. Our data support a position considering that the left IPS acts as an attentional modulator of distant neural networks which themselves are specialized in processing order or language representations. More generally, they strengthen attention-based accounts of verbal STM. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effects of aging on the recognition of different types of associations
Bastin, Christine ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Experimental Aging Research (2006), 32

The present study examined how aging influences item and associative recognition memory, and compared memory for two types of associations: associations between the same kinds of information and ... [more ▼]

The present study examined how aging influences item and associative recognition memory, and compared memory for two types of associations: associations between the same kinds of information and associations between different kinds of information. A group of young adults and a group of older adults performed a forced-choice face recognition task and two multitrial forced-choice associative recognition tasks, assessing memory for face-face and face-spatial location associations. The results showed disproportionate age-related decline of associative recognition compared to intact item recognition. Moreover, aging affected both types of associative tasks in the same way. The findings support an associative deficit hypothesis (Naveh-Benjamin, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 26, 1170–1187, 2000), which attributes a substantial part of the age effect on episodic memory tasks to difficulty with binding individual components into a cohesive memory trace. This associative deficit seems to affect same-information associations, as well as different-information associations. [less ▲]

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See detailAn exploration of the relationships between short-term memory for serial order information, item information and new word learning in adults
Majerus, Steve ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg; Elsen, B. et al

in European Journal of Cognitive Psychology (2006), 18(6), 848-873

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See detailReality monitoring and motor memory in checking-prone individuals
Zermatten, A.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laroi, Frank ULg et al

in Journal of Anxiety Disorders (2006), 20(5), 580-596

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See detailHallucinations and delusions in children and adolescents
Laroi, Frank ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Goëb, Jean-Louis

in Current Psychiatry Reviews (2006), 2

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See detailA French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale: Confirmatory factor analysis in a sample of undergraduate students
Van der Linden, Martial ULg; d'Acremont, M.; Zermatten, A. et al

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2006), 22(1), 38-42

Impulsivity is an important and multifaceted psychological construct. Recently, Whiteside and Lynam (2001) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale that distinguishes four dimensions of ... [more ▼]

Impulsivity is an important and multifaceted psychological construct. Recently, Whiteside and Lynam (2001) have developed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale that distinguishes four dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. In the present study, we investigated the psychometric properties of a French adaptation of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Two hundred and thirty-four undergraduate students completed the UPPS Scale. Exploratory and confirmatory analyses revealed a four factors solution similar to that found in the original study. Also, the results indicated that there was good to very good internal reliability for the four subscales. [less ▲]

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See detailInfluence of emotion on memory for temporal information
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in Emotion (Washington, D.C.) (2005), 5(4), 503-507

Contextual information. such as color and spatial location, has been found to be better remembered for emotional than for neutral items. The current study examined whether the influence of emotion extends ... [more ▼]

Contextual information. such as color and spatial location, has been found to be better remembered for emotional than for neutral items. The current study examined whether the influence of emotion extends to memory for another fundamental feature of episodic memory: temporal information. Results from a list-discrimination paradigm showed that (a) item memory was enhanced for both negative and positive pictures compared with neutral ones and was better for negative than for positive pictures and (b) temporal information was better remembered for negative than for positive and neutral pictures, whereas positive and neutral pictures did not differ from each other. These findings are discussed in relation to the processes involved in memory for temporal information. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimisation de la spécificité d’encodage pour le diagnostic précoce de la maladie d’Alzheimer
Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Ivanoiu, Adrian et al

Conference (2005, November 24)

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See detailAffective valence and the self-reference effect: influence of retrieval conditions
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Comblain, Christine; Van der Linden, Martial ULg

in British Journal of Psychology (2005), 96(Pt 4), 457-466

Positive trait information is typically better recalled than negative trait information when encoded in reference to the self, but not when encoded in reference to someone else or when processed for ... [more ▼]

Positive trait information is typically better recalled than negative trait information when encoded in reference to the self, but not when encoded in reference to someone else or when processed for general meaning. This study examined whether this influence of affective meaning is modulated by retrieval conditions. Participants encoded positive and negative trait adjectives in reference to themselves or to a celebrity. They were then presented with either a free-recall task (Experiment 1) or a recognition memory task (Experiment 2). Positive adjectives were better recalled than negative adjectives, but only when they were encoded in reference to the self. In contrast, encoding condition and valence did not interact in the recognition memory task. Taken together, these findings suggest that the difference in memory between positive and negative self-referent information is due, at least in part, to a control exerted on memory retrieval. [less ▲]

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See detailTreating verbal short-term memory deficits by increasing the duration of temporary phonological representations : a case study
Majerus, Steve ULg; Van Der Kaa, M. A.; Renard, Cécile ULg et al

in Brain & Language (2005), 95(1), 174-175

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See detailExploring the unity and diversity of the neural substrates of executive functioning
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2005), 25(4), 409-423

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating ... [more ▼]

Previous studies exploring the neural substrates of executive functioning used task-specific analyses, which might not be the most appropriate approach due to the difficulty of precisely isolating executive functions. Consequently, the aim of this study was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to reexamine by conjunction and interaction paradigms the cerebral areas associated with three executive processes (updating, shifting, and inhibition). Three conjunction analyses allowed us to isolate the cerebral areas common to tasks selected to tap into the same executive process. A global conjunction analysis demonstrated that foci of activation common to all tasks were observed in the right intraparietal sulcus, the left superior parietal gyrus, and at a lower statistical threshold, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. These regions thus seem to play a general role in executive functioning. The right intraparietal sulcus seems to play a role in selective attention to relevant stimuli and in suppression of irrelevant information. The left superior parietal region is involved in amodal switching/integration processes. One hypothesis regarding the functional role of the lateral prefrontal cortex is that monitoring and temporal organization of cognitive processes are necessary to carry out ongoing tasks. Finally, interaction analyses showed that specific prefrontal cerebral areas were associated with each executive process. The results of this neuro-imaging study are in agreement with cognitive studies demonstrating that executive functioning is characterized by both unity and diversity of processes. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of both prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex in dual-task performance
Collette, Fabienne ULg; Olivier, L.; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in Cognitive Brain Research (2005), 24(2), 237-251

This PET study explored the neural substrate of both dual-task management and integration task using single tasks that are known not to evoke any prefrontal activation. The paradigm included two simple ... [more ▼]

This PET study explored the neural substrate of both dual-task management and integration task using single tasks that are known not to evoke any prefrontal activation. The paradigm included two simple (visual and auditory) discrimination tasks, a dual task and an integration task (requiring simultaneous visual and auditory discrimination), and baseline tasks (passive viewing and hearing). Data were analyzed using SPM99. As predicted, the comparison of each single task to the baseline task showed no activity in prefrontal areas. The comparison of the dual task to the single tasks demonstrated left-sided foci of activity in the frontal gyrus (BA 9/46, BA 10/47 and BA 6), inferior parietal gyrus (BA 40), and cerebellum. By reference to previous neuroimaging studies, BA 9/46 was associated with the coordinated manipulation of simultaneously presented information, BA 10/47 with selection processes, BA 6 with articulatory rehearsal, and BA 40 with attentional shifting. Globally similar regions were found for the integration task, except that the inferior parietal gyrus was not recruited. These results confirm the hypothesis that the left prefrontal cortex is implicated in dual-task performance. Moreover, the involvement of a parietal area in the dual task is in keeping with the hypothesis that a parieto-frontal network sustains executive functioning. [less ▲]

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See detailFurther exploration of controlled and automatic memory processes in early Alzheimer's disease
Adam, Stéphane ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Neuropsychology (2005), 19(4), 420-427

The authors' aim in this study was to explore automatic and controlled processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) by using a variant of the word-stem completion task that applies the process-dissociation ... [more ▼]

The authors' aim in this study was to explore automatic and controlled processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) by using a variant of the word-stem completion task that applies the process-dissociation procedure. Several methodological precautions were taken in order to limit problems observed in previous studies (e.g., poor task sensitivity, ceiling and/or floor effects, no control over comprehension of instructions). Our results (a) confirmed the marked deterioration in controlled processes and (b) showed that when psychometric constraints were limited, automatic memory processes were preserved in AD. These data are in line with those from more global studies in suggesting that AD is characterized by an early deterioration in controlled processes and an initial preservation of automatic processes. [less ▲]

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See detailControlled and automatic uses of memory in depressed patients: effect of retention interval lengths
Jermann, Françoise; Van der Linden, Martial ULg; Adam, Stéphane ULg et al

in Behaviour Research and Therapy (2005), 43(5), 681-690

The present study examines controlled and automatic uses of memory in clinically depressed patients by applying the Process Dissociation Procedure developed by Jacoby (1991) to a stem completion memory ... [more ▼]

The present study examines controlled and automatic uses of memory in clinically depressed patients by applying the Process Dissociation Procedure developed by Jacoby (1991) to a stem completion memory task with short and long retention intervals. The results show that the contribution of controlled processes is lower in depressed patients than in controls, especially for the longest retention interval, whereas the contribution of automatic processes is equivalent in both groups and unaffected by the length of the retention interval. These findings are discussed in a cognitive control framework. (c) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-referential reflective activity and its relationship with rest : a PET study
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Van der Linden, Martial ULg et al

in NeuroImage (2005), 25(2), 616-624

This study used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the brain substrate of self-referential reflective activity and to investigate its relationship with brain areas that are active during the ... [more ▼]

This study used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the brain substrate of self-referential reflective activity and to investigate its relationship with brain areas that are active during the resting state. Thirteen healthy volunteers performed reflective tasks pertaining to three different matters (the self, another person, and social issues) while they were scanned. Rest scans were also acquired, in which subjects were asked to simply relax and not think in a systematic way. The mental activity experienced during each scan was assessed with rating scales. The results showed that, although self-referential thoughts were most frequent during the self-referential task, some self-referential reflective activity also occurred during rest. Compared to rest, performing the reflective tasks was associated with increased blood flow in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the left anterior middle temporal gyros, the temporal pole bilaterally, and the right cerebellum; there was a decrease of blood flow in right prefrontal regions,and in medial and right lateral parietal regions. In addition, the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) (1) was more active during the self-referential reflective task than during the other two reflective tasks, (2) showed common activation during rest and the self-referential task, and (3) showed a correlation between cerebral metabolism and the amount of self-referential processing. It is suggested that the VMPFC is crucial for representing knowledge pertaining to the self and that this is an important function of the resting state. [less ▲]

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