References of "Van Steen, Kristel"
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See detailHeritability of blood concentrations of sex-steroids in relation to body composition in young adult male siblings.
Bogaert, Veerle; Taes, Youri; Konings, Peter et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (2008), 69(1), 129-35

OBJECTIVE: Sex steroid concentrations in men are related to body composition and both are determined by genetic and environmental factors. This study investigates heritability estimates of sex steroid ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Sex steroid concentrations in men are related to body composition and both are determined by genetic and environmental factors. This study investigates heritability estimates of sex steroid serum concentrations and body composition as well as the genetic and environmental components of their interrelation. PATIENTS: Six hundred and seventy-four men (25-45 years) were included in this study with 274 independent pairs of brothers. MEASUREMENTS: Body composition and regional fat mass estimates were determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Serum testosterone (T), SHBG, oestradiol (E(2)) and LH levels were determined by immunoassay; free T and E(2) levels were calculated. RESULTS: Both sex steroid hormone concentrations and indices of body composition exhibited significant heritability estimates. Among sex steroid hormones, T had the highest heritability (h(2) = 0.65), followed by free T (h(2) = 0.54). A heritability of 0.73 was observed for SHBG; a heritability estimate of 0.83 was obtained for body weight. Significant genetic correlations were found between whole body fat mass and serum T (rho(G) = -0.46), free T (rho(G) = -0.27) and SHBG (rho(G) = -0.48) concentrations. No genetic relationship was observed between total (F) E(2) or LH concentrations, respectively, and body composition. CONCLUSION: Both sex steroid serum levels and body composition are under strong genetic control. Their interrelation is in part underlied by a genetic correlation, indicative of the action of shared genes. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of psoriasiform skin lesions under anti-TNF therapy: a genetic link?
Cleynen, I.; Claes, B.; Nuytten, H. et al

in Conference Abstract Book (2008)

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See detailGenetic markers and the risk of complicated disease behaviour in Crohn's disease patients
Henckaerts, L.; Cleynen, I.; Joossens, M. et al

in Gastroenterology (2008), 134(4), 349-349

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See detailMucosal gene signatures to predict response to infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2008), 134

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See detailEffect of infliximab treatment on colonic mucosal gene expression profiles in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Arijs, I.; Quintens, R.; Van Lommel, L. et al

in Gut (2008), 57(Suppl II), 39

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See detailMicroarray study of mucosal antimicrobial peptides in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2008), 2(1), 60

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See detailTNFA-3086 > A in two international population-based cohorts and risk of asthma
Castro-Giner, F.; Kogevinas, M.; Maechler, M. et al

in European Respiratory Journal (2008), 32(2), 350-361

Genetic association studies have related the tumour necrosis factor-a gene (TNFA) guanine to adenine substitution of nucleotide -308 (-3086 > A) polymorphism to increased risk of asthma, but results are ... [more ▼]

Genetic association studies have related the tumour necrosis factor-a gene (TNFA) guanine to adenine substitution of nucleotide -308 (-3086 > A) polymorphism to increased risk of asthma, but results are inconsistent. The aim of the present study was to test whether two single-nucleotide polymorphisms, of TNFA and of the lymphotoxin-alpha gene (LTA), are associated with asthma, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and atopy in adults, by combining the results of two large population-based multicentric studies and conducting a meta-analysis of previously published studies. The European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) and Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA) used comparable protocols, including questionnaires for respiratory symptoms and measures of lung function and atopy. DNA samples from 11,136 participants were genotyped at TNFA -308 and LTA 252. Logistic regression employing fixed and random effects models and nonparametric techniques were used. The prevalence of asthma was 6%. The TNFA -3086 > A polymorphism was associated with increased asthma prevalence and with bronchial hyperresponsiveness. No consistent association was found for atopy. The LTA 252A > G polymorphism was not associated with any of the outcomes. A meta-analysis of 17 studies showed an increased asthma risk for the TNFA -308 adenine allele. The tumour necrosis factor-alpha gene nucleotide -308 polymorphism is associated with a moderately increased risk of asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, but not with atopy. These results are supported by a meta-analysis of previously published studies. [less ▲]

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See detailLong term stability of gut microbiota in Crohn’s disease patients compared to healthy relatives
Joossens, M.; De Preter, V.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2008), 71

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See detailFAM-MDR: a flexible method of multifactor dimensionality reduction for high-order interaction detection
Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Calle, M.; Urrea, V. et al

in Conference Abstract book (2008)

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See detailAlternative methods to detect gene-gene interactions
De Lobel, L.; De Meyer, H.; Baele, G. et al

in Conference Abstract Book (2008)

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See detailFaecal bacterial dgge profiles of Crohn's disease patients are different from those of their healthy first degree relatives and matched healthy controls
Joossens, M.; Vanhoutte, T.; De Preter, V. et al

in Gastroenterology (2007), 132(4), 704-704

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See detailGene expression profiling to predict the response of infliximab in patients with UC
Arijs, Ingrid; Van lommel, Leertje; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2007), 132(4), 174-174

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See detailMixed IBD families: A distinct entity within IBD
Pierik, M.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg; Joossens, M. et al

in Gastroenterology (2007), 132(4), 450-450

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See detailGenetic markers and the risk of complicated disease behaviour in Crohn’s disease patients
Henckaerts, L.; Verstreken, I.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gut (2007)

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See detailAnalysis of incomplete data
Molenberghs, G.; Beunkens, C.; Thijs, H. et al

in SAS System for Clinical Trials II (2007)

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See detailGenetic markers and the risk of complicated disease behaviour in Crohn's disease patients
Henckaerts, Liesbet; Verstreken, Isabel; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2007), 1(1), 41-42

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See detailFaecal bacterial dgge profiles of Crohn's disease patients are different from those of their healthy first degree relatives and matched healthy controls
Joossens, Marie; Vanhoutte, Tom; De preter, Vicky et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2007), 1(1), 55

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See detailFaecal bacterial DGGE profiles of Crohn’s disease patients are different from those of their healthy first degree relatives and matched healthy controls
Joossens, M.; Vanhoutte, T.; De Preter, V. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2007)

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See detailNew serological markers in inflammatory bowel disease are associated with complicated disease behavior
Ferrante, M.; Henckaerts, L.; Joossens, M. et al

in Gut (2007), 56(10), 1394-1403

OBJECTIVE: The human androgen receptor (AR) contains a polyglutamine and a polyglycine stretch which are highly polymorphic and are coded respectively by a CAG and GGN repeat in exon 1 of the AR gene ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The human androgen receptor (AR) contains a polyglutamine and a polyglycine stretch which are highly polymorphic and are coded respectively by a CAG and GGN repeat in exon 1 of the AR gene. Although the in vitro studies indicated a possible effect of the GGN repeat polymorphism on the AR gene transcription and clinical observations suggest that it might modulate the androgen action, its functional significance remains unclear. We wanted to assess whether the GGN repeat affects the serum testosterone levels in healthy men, which is the expected outcome through feedback regulation if it influences androgen action as has been shown to be the case for the CAG repeat. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: A population based cross-sectional cohort study including 1476 healthy young, middle-aged, and elderly men. MEASUREMENT: Testosterone and LH levels were determined by immunoassay; free testosterone (FT) levels were calculated. Genotyping of the GGN repeat was performed using the sequencing technique. RESULTS: The GGN repeat number was significantly associated with circulating testosterone and FT levels (P=0.017 and P=0.013 respectively). However, taking into account that age, body mass index, and CAG are already in the regression model, the GGN repeat could explain only a small part of the variation of both testosterone and FT. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a significant positive association between the GGN repeat and androgen levels in a large cohort of healthy men. Although the present study thus adds credence to the view that the polyglycine tract in the AR can modulate AR action, this effect appears to be only small so that its clinical relevance remains questionable. [less ▲]

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