References of "Van Assche, G."
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of infliximab therapy on colonic mucosal expression of barrier genes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Arijs, I.; Quintens, R.; Van Lommel, L. et al

in Gastroenterology (2009), 136

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term outcome of treatment with infliximab in 614 patients with Crohn's disease: results from a single-centre cohort
Schnitzler, F.; Fidder, H.; Ferrante, M. et al

in Gut (2009), 58(4), 492-500

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This observational study assessed the long-term clinical benefit of infliximab (IFX) in 614 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease (CD) from a single centre during a median follow ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This observational study assessed the long-term clinical benefit of infliximab (IFX) in 614 consecutive patients with Crohn's disease (CD) from a single centre during a median follow-up of 55 months (interquartile range (IQR) 27-83). METHODS: The primary analysis looked at the proportion of patients with initial response to IFX who had sustained clinical benefit at the end of follow-up. The long-term effects of IFX on the course of CD as reflected by the rate of surgery and hospitalisations and need for corticosteroids were also analysed. RESULTS: 10.9% of patients were primary non-responders to IFX. Sustained benefit was observed in 347 of the 547 patients (63.4%) receiving long-term treatment. In 68.3% of these, treatment with IFX was ongoing and in 31.7% IFX was stopped, with the patient being in remission. Seventy patients (12.8%) had to stop IFX due to side effects and 118 (21.6%) due to loss of response. Although the yearly drop-out rates of IFX in patients with episodic (10.7%) and scheduled treatment (7.1%) were similar, the need for hospitalisations and surgery decreased less in the episodic than in the scheduled group. Steroid discontinuation also occurred in a higher proportion of patients in the scheduled group than in the episodic group. CONCLUSIONS: In this large real-life cohort of patients with CD, long-term treatment with IFX was very efficacious to maintain improvement during a median follow-up of almost 5 years and changed disease outcome by decreasing the rate of hospitalisations and surgery. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailColonic mucosal expression of barrier genes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after first infliximab treatment.
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2009), 3(1), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPredictive Value of C-Reactive Protein Level Changes On the Long Term Outcome of Infliximab in Crohn's Disease
Jürgens, M.; Schnitzler, F.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTECK and MADCAM-1 mucosal expression in active IBD: the effect of infliximab therapy
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2009), 136

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe impact of infliximab therapy on colonic mucosal expression of barrier genes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Arijs, I.; Quintens, R.; Van Lommel, L. et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucosal Healing Predicts Long-term Outcome of Maintenance Therapy with Infliximab in Crohn's Disease
Schnitzler, F.; Fidder, H.; Ferrante, M. et al

in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (2009), 15(9), 1295-1301

Background: Infliximab (IFX) treatment induces mucosal healing (MH) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) but the impact of MH oil the long-term outcome of IFX treatment in CID is still debated. Methods ... [more ▼]

Background: Infliximab (IFX) treatment induces mucosal healing (MH) in patients with Crohn's disease (CD) but the impact of MH oil the long-term outcome of IFX treatment in CID is still debated. Methods: We studied MH during long-term treatment with IFX in 214 CID patients. A total of 193 patients (85.5%) responded to induction therapy and 31 patients (14.5%) were primary nonresponders. They underwent lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy within a median of 0.7 months (interquartile range [IQR] 0.1-6.9) prior to first IFX and after a median of 6.7 months (IQR 1.4-24.6) after start of IFX and were further analyzed. The relationship between the outcome of IFX treatment long-term and MH was studied. Results: MH was observed in 67.8% of the 183 initial responders (n = 124), with 83 patients having complete healing (45.4%) and 41 having partial healing (22.4%). Scheduled IFX treatment from the start resulted in MH more frequently (76.9% MH rate) than episodic treatment (61.0% MH rate; P = 0.0222, odds ratio [OR] 2.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11-4.12). Concomitant treatment with corticosteroids (CS) had a negative impact on MH (37.9% in patients with CS versus 63.2% in patients without CS; P = 0.021, OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.16-0.80). MH was associated with a significantly lower need for major abdominal surgery (MAS) during long-term follow-up (14.1% of patients with MH needed MAS versus 38.4% of patients Without MH: P < 0.0001). Conclusions: MH induced by long-term maintenance IFX treatment is associated with an improved long-term outcome of the I disease especially with a lower need for major abdominal surgeries. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucosal Gene Expression of Antimicrobial Peptides in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Before and After First Infliximab Treatment
Arijs, I.; De Hertogh, G.; Lemaire, K. et al

in PLoS ONE (2009), 4(11), 7984

Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) protect the host intestinal mucosa against microorganisms. Abnormal expression of defensins was shown in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear ... [more ▼]

Background: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) protect the host intestinal mucosa against microorganisms. Abnormal expression of defensins was shown in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but it is not clear whether this is a primary defect. We investigated the impact of anti-inflammatory therapy with infliximab on the mucosal gene expression of AMPs in IBD. Methodology/Principal Findings: Mucosal gene expression of 81 AMPs was assessed in 61 IBD patients before and 4-6 weeks after their first infliximab infusion and in 12 control patients, using Affymetrix arrays. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm microarray data. The dysregulation of many AMPs in colonic IBD in comparison with control colons was widely restored by infliximab therapy, and only DEFB1 expression remained significantly decreased after therapy in the colonic mucosa of IBD responders to infliximab. In ileal Crohn's disease (CD), expression of two neuropeptides with antimicrobial activity, PYY and CHGB, was significantly decreased before therapy compared to control ileums, and ileal PYY expression remained significantly decreased after therapy in CD responders. Expression of the downregulated AMPs before and after treatment (DEFB1 and PYY) correlated with villin 1 expression, a gut epithelial cell marker, indicating that the decrease is a consequence of epithelial damage. Conclusions/Significance: Our study shows that the dysregulation of AMPs in IBD mucosa is the consequence of inflammation, but may be responsible for perpetuation of inflammation due to ineffective clearance of microorganisms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (10 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucosal gene signatures to predict response to infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (14 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGene expression of antimicrobial peptides in colonic mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after first infliximab treatment.
Arijs, I.; Lemaire, K.; Quintens, R. et al

in Gut (2008), 57(Suppl II), 102-103

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term efficacy of infliximab and colectomy-free survival in outpatients with refractory ulcerative colitis.
Ferrante, M.; Vermeire, S.; Schnitzler, F. et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2008), 2(1), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (13 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term outcome after infliximab for refractory ulcerative colitis
Ferrante, M.; Vermeire, S.; Fidder, H. et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2008), 2(3), 219-225

Background and aims: Infliximab (IFX) has been shown efficacious for moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC), but data on long-term efficacy are tacking. We investigated long-term outcome including ... [more ▼]

Background and aims: Infliximab (IFX) has been shown efficacious for moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC), but data on long-term efficacy are tacking. We investigated long-term outcome including colectomy rates in outpatients treated with IFX for refractory UC in a single referral centre, and evaluated if predictors could be identified. Methods: The first 121 outpatients (median age 38.0 years) with refractory UC treated with IFX were included. The primary outcome was colectomy-free survival. Secondary measures were sustained clinical response and serious adverse events. Results: From the 81 patients (67%) with an initial clinical response to IFX, 68% had a sustained clinical response. No independent predictors of sustained clinical response could be identified. Over a median (IQR) follow-up period of 33.0 (17.0-49.8) months, 21 patients (17%) came to colectomy. Independent predictors of colectomy were absence of short-term clinical response [Hazard ratio 10.8 (95% Cl 3.5-32.8), p < 0.001], a baseline CRP level >= 5 mg/L [Hazard ratio 14.5 (95% Cl 2.0-108.6), p=0.006] and previous IV treatment with corticosteroids and/or cyctosporine [Hazard ratio 2.4 (95% Cl 1.1-5.9), p=0.033]. Six patients developed a serious infection, three a malignancy, two a post-operative complication and one patient died (suicide). Conclusions: With a median follow-upof 33.0 months after start of IFX, 17% of patients with refractory UC needed colectomy, while sustained clinical response was present in 68% of initial responders. (c) 2008 European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucosal gene signatures to predict response to infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2008), 2(1), 64

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMucosal gene signatures to predict response to infliximab in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Gastroenterology (2008), 134

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEffect of infliximab treatment on colonic mucosal gene expression profiles in patients with inflammatory bowel disease
Arijs, I.; Quintens, R.; Van Lommel, L. et al

in Gut (2008), 57(Suppl II), 39

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMicroarray study of mucosal antimicrobial peptides in patients with inflammatory bowel disease before and after infliximab treatment.
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2008), 2(1), 60

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew serological markers in inflammatory bowel disease are associated with complicated disease behavior
Ferrante, M.; Henckaerts, L.; Joossens, M. et al

in Gut (2007), 56(10), 1394-1403

OBJECTIVE: The human androgen receptor (AR) contains a polyglutamine and a polyglycine stretch which are highly polymorphic and are coded respectively by a CAG and GGN repeat in exon 1 of the AR gene ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The human androgen receptor (AR) contains a polyglutamine and a polyglycine stretch which are highly polymorphic and are coded respectively by a CAG and GGN repeat in exon 1 of the AR gene. Although the in vitro studies indicated a possible effect of the GGN repeat polymorphism on the AR gene transcription and clinical observations suggest that it might modulate the androgen action, its functional significance remains unclear. We wanted to assess whether the GGN repeat affects the serum testosterone levels in healthy men, which is the expected outcome through feedback regulation if it influences androgen action as has been shown to be the case for the CAG repeat. DESIGN AND PATIENTS: A population based cross-sectional cohort study including 1476 healthy young, middle-aged, and elderly men. MEASUREMENT: Testosterone and LH levels were determined by immunoassay; free testosterone (FT) levels were calculated. Genotyping of the GGN repeat was performed using the sequencing technique. RESULTS: The GGN repeat number was significantly associated with circulating testosterone and FT levels (P=0.017 and P=0.013 respectively). However, taking into account that age, body mass index, and CAG are already in the regression model, the GGN repeat could explain only a small part of the variation of both testosterone and FT. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a significant positive association between the GGN repeat and androgen levels in a large cohort of healthy men. Although the present study thus adds credence to the view that the polyglycine tract in the AR can modulate AR action, this effect appears to be only small so that its clinical relevance remains questionable. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGene expression profiling to predict the response of infliximab in patients with UC
Arijs, I.; Van Lommel, L.; Van Steen, Kristel ULg et al

in Journal of Crohn’s and Colitis [=JCC] (2007), 1(1), 34

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (5 ULg)