References of "Vaira, Dolorès"
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See detailAlcohol craving and the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor gene
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Gorwood, P.; Reggers, Jean ULg et al

in European Psychiatry (2005, March), 20(Suppl. 1), 25

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See detailHCV genotypes 2 and 3: the predominant genotypes at the horizon 2020?
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2005, January), 68(1), 25

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See detailEvolution over a 10 year period of the epidemiological profile of 1,726 newly diagnosed HCV patients in Belgium.
Gerard, Christiane ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Journal of Medical Virology (2005), 76(4), 503-10

In order to evaluate the future burden of hepatitis C, there is a need to quantify the evolution with time of some crucial parameters such as disease frequency and age, modes of infection and infecting ... [more ▼]

In order to evaluate the future burden of hepatitis C, there is a need to quantify the evolution with time of some crucial parameters such as disease frequency and age, modes of infection and infecting genotypes of patients presenting for the first time at consultation. The yearly evolution of these parameters was analyzed retrospectively in a cohort of 1,726 patients living in Belgium, who were diagnosed as hepatitis C virus (HCV) carriers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between 1992 and 2002. The epidemiological profile of HCV patients showed significant changes during this period. The number of new patients increased with time. The proportion of patients under 50 increased linearly at a rate of 3% per year. The rate of newly presenting patients infected by transfusion before 1990 decreased, but only by 2.7% per year. The proportion of intravenous (IV) drug users increased by 2.5% per year. Patients presenting "undefined" risk factors increased by 2.1% per year. Nosocomial acquisition of HCV infection exhibited a disturbing relative stability in time whereas dialysis tended to disappear as a cause of infection. There was a significant linear annual decrease of 2.3% in the frequency of genotype 1b, which was counterbalanced by a significant increase of 0.7% for genotype 1a and 1.1% for genotype 4. Genotypes 2 and 3 did not vary significantly with time. Such figures are useful for evaluating the epidemiological changes of C virus infection and for anticipating the future economical cost of hepatitis C treatment in the next few years. [less ▲]

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See detailCurrent levels of drug resistance among therapy-naive HIV-infected patients have significant impact on treatment response
Derdelinckx, Inge; Van Laethem, Kristel; Maes, Bart et al

in Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes [=JAIDS] (2004), 37(5), 1664-1666

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See detailVirologic therapy response significantly correlates with the number of active drugs as evaluated using a LiPA HIV-1 resistance scoring system
Ziermann, Rainer; Celis, Linda; Derdelinckx, Inge et al

in Journal of Clinical Virology (2004), 31(Suppl. 1), 7-15

Background: Resistance testing is increasingly accepted as a tool in guiding the selection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected individuals who fail ... [more ▼]

Background: Resistance testing is increasingly accepted as a tool in guiding the selection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected individuals who fail their current regimen. Objectives: To descriptively compare the correlation between virologic treatment response and results using three genotypic HIV-1 drug resistance interpretation systems: the VERSANT(R) HIV-1 Resistance Assay (LiPA) system and two sequence-based interpretation systems. Study design: Specimens from 213 HIV-1-infected subjects, either starting (n = 104) or switching to (n = 109) a regimen of three or four antiretroviral drugs, were collected retrospectively at baseline and after 3 months of uninterrupted therapy. The correlation between viral load change and the number of predicted active drugs in the treatment regimen was assessed. An interpretation algorithm was recently developed to process VERSANT(R) HIV-1 Resistance Assay (LiPA) data. The number of active drugs predicted using this algorithm was rank correlated with the viral load change over a 3-month treatment period. For comparison, a similar calculation was made using two sequence-based algorithms (REGA version 5.5 and VGI GuideLines(TM) Rules 4.0), both applied on the same sequences. Results: Statistically significant (p < 0.05) correlation coefficients for each of the three HIV-1 drug resistance interpretation systems were observed in the treatment-experienced subjects on a 3-drug regimen (-0.39, -0.38, and -0.42, respectively) as well as on a 4-drug regimen (-0.33, -0.31, and -0.37, respectively). However, no significant correlation was observed in treatment-naive subjects, probably due to the very low frequency of drug resistance in these subjects. Conclusion: All three genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems (LiPA version 1, REGA version 5.5, and VGI GuideLines(TM) Rules 4.0) were statistically significantly correlated with virologic therapy response as measured by viral load testing. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailHpatitis C infection: eligibility for antiviral therapies
El souda, R; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; GERARD, Christiane ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2004), 67

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See detailHCV genotype 5: an easy to treat population
REENAERS, Catherine ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; GERARD, Christiane ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2004), 67

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See detailHCV genotype 4 in Belgium: epidemiological characteristics
REENAERS, Catherine ULg; DELWAIDE, Jean ULg; GERARD, Christiane ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (2004), (67), 03

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See detailPerformance of the VERSANT (R) HIV-1 Resistance Assays (LiPA) for detecting drug resistance in therapy-naive patients infected with different HIV-1 subtypes
Derdelinckx, Inge; Van Laethem, Kristel; Maes, Baert et al

in FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology (2003), 39(2), 119-124

In this study we evaluated the performance of the VERSANT((R)) HIV-1 Resistance Assays (LiPA) in detecting drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-infected patients diagnosed in Belgium in 2000. We compared ... [more ▼]

In this study we evaluated the performance of the VERSANT((R)) HIV-1 Resistance Assays (LiPA) in detecting drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-infected patients diagnosed in Belgium in 2000. We compared the results with population sequencing and found concordance to be in line with previous studies in treatment-experienced patients (86.87% for reverse transcriptase (RT); 92.77% for protease (PRO)). Discordance was mainly due to indeterminate reactions on LiPA (8.45% for RT; 6.85% for PRO) and minor discordances (4.13% for RT; 0.25% for PRO). Major discordances were rare (0.46% for RT; 0.12% for PRO). Indeterminate reactions were significantly associated with strains belonging to non-B subtypes. (C) 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V.. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between DRD2 and DAT polymorphisms and personality traits in healthy subjects
Pinto, Emmanuel ULg; Reggers, Jean ULg; Adam, Martine ULg et al

in European Neuropsychopharmacology (2003, September), 13(Suppl. 4), 427-428

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See detailResistance testing in children changing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitor
Servais, Jean-Michel ULg; Hainaut, M.; Schmitz, V. et al

in Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal (2002), 21(3), 214-220

Objective. To assess genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in HIV-1-infected children failing a first protease inhibitor (PI) therapy. Methods. In a multicenter observational study 21 children, ages ... [more ▼]

Objective. To assess genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in HIV-1-infected children failing a first protease inhibitor (PI) therapy. Methods. In a multicenter observational study 21 children, ages 3 to 16 years, were given two reverse transcriptase inhibitors and one PI (mainly ritonavir, n = 18). They were subsequently treated with single or dual PI-based therapy (predominantly nelfinavir, n = 10, or ritonavir-saquinavir, n = 7). Resistance testing was performed at the time of therapy switch via direct sequencing and a recombinant virus susceptibility assay. Results. A total of 21 genotypic and 15 phenotypic resistance profiles were obtained. Most viruses displayed several reverse transcriptase mutations; however, 7 isolates maintained a wild-type protease. Ritonavir targeted the well-known pathway containing 82, 54, 46 and other secondary (nonactive site) mutations including T74A. No in vitro cross-resistance, i.e. greater than or equal to8-fold resistance to saquinavir or amprenavir, was encountered. Secondary mutations enhanced the prediction of ritonavir resistance (i.e. L10I) and in vitro nelfinavir cross-resistance (i.e. K20R/I conferred by primary (active site) resistance mutations. Either the 82, 54, 46 mutational genotype or the phenotype showing greater than or equal to8-fold nelfinavir cross-resistance predicted a poorer virologic response to nelfinavir salvage therapy. Conclusion. In a small cohort of heavily pretreated pediatric patients, resistance testing appears to predict the response to nelfinavir as salvage for a ritonavir-based therapy. This is further supported by the correlation between ritonavir-selected mutations and in vitro nelfinavir cross-resistance. Prospective studies should assess clinical outcome in children undergoing regimen changes based on resistance testing. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug resistance among therapy-naive HIV-infected patients studied by sequencing and VERSANT (TM) HIV-1 resistance assays (LiPA) has limited impact on treatment response
Derdelinckx, I.; Van Laethem, K.; Maes, B. et al

in Antiviral therapy (2002), 7(Suppl. 1), 181

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See detailHIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs: Mechanisms, genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in clinical practice
Blaise, Pierre ULg; Clevenbergh, P.; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Acta Clinica Belgica (2002), 57(4, Jul-Aug), 191-201

HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence ... [more ▼]

HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence of HIV resistant strains in most of the patients. Phenotypic assays look for an increase in the antiretroviral drug (ARV) concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of the tested HIV strain (IC50), comparatively with a reference strain cultivated in parallel. Genotypic tests detect resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase and protease genes by comparing the gene sequences of a resistant virus to those of a wildtype strain that has previously been described. The efficacy of each ARV class and each individual ARV is threatened by specific mutations and resistance mechanisms. In retrospective studies of genotypic or phenotypic resistance testing, baseline resistance tests results were correlated with virological outcomes. There is some evidence from prospective studies that resistance testing may have some benefits when used to choose salvage regimens. However, problems in the areas of test interpretation, patient compliance, availability of active drugs, and technical test performance limit the usefulness of resistance testing in clinical practice. This article reviews the mechanisms underlying HIV resistance, the principles of phenotypic and genotypic tests, and the use of these tests in clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection of Aspergillus spp. by PCR in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid
Hayette, Marie-Pierre ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg; Suzin, Fabrice et al

in Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2001), 39(6), 2338-2340

The usefulness of a nested PCR assay for detection of Aspergillus sp. DNA was evaluated in 177 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens. This test was accurate both to diagnose culture-negative BAL ... [more ▼]

The usefulness of a nested PCR assay for detection of Aspergillus sp. DNA was evaluated in 177 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens. This test was accurate both to diagnose culture-negative BAL fluid specimens from patients with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis and to confirm culture-positive samples. However, it did not differentiate between infection and colonization. [less ▲]

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See detailComment je traite une ascite
Gielen, S.; Delwaide, Jean ULg; Detry, Olivier ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2001), 56(12), 809-815

Ascites is the most common of the major complications of cirrhosis. The initial evaluation of a patient with ascites should include a history, physical evaluation and some investigations. Treatment should ... [more ▼]

Ascites is the most common of the major complications of cirrhosis. The initial evaluation of a patient with ascites should include a history, physical evaluation and some investigations. Treatment should consist of treating the underlying liver disease, sodium restricted diet (2 g of Na+/day) and diuretics. This regimen is effective in 90 % of patients. The treatment options for the diuretic-resistant patients include serial therapeutic paracentesis, peritoneovenous shunting, TIPSand liver transplantation. The treatment and prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis which is a frequent and severe complication in cirrhotic patients with ascites is also important. The differential diagnosis with secondary bacterial peritonitisis is essential because the latter usually does not resolve unless patients are surgically treated. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence-Based Medicine: traitement de l'hépatite chronique C. GLEVHE. Groupe Liégeois d'Etude des Virus Hépatotropes.
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2000), 55(5), 337-340

The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects nearly 170 million people in the world. The major characteristic of virus C is its tendency to chronicity in more than 85% of cases. Generally asymptomatic, HCV ... [more ▼]

The Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects nearly 170 million people in the world. The major characteristic of virus C is its tendency to chronicity in more than 85% of cases. Generally asymptomatic, HCV infection may also evolve with time to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. During the last few years, HCV-related end-stage cirrhosis has become the first cause of liver transplantation. In 10 years only, very significant progress has been made in the knowledge of the virus, not only in the field of diagnosis but also in therapy. Several consensus conferences taking last discoveries into account have been organized in order to promote recommendations useful for the management of hepatitis C patients. The aim of this short overview is to summarize practical recommendations that emerged recently from consensus meetings. [less ▲]

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See detailLa transmission du virus de l’hépatite C en milieu hospitalier
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Belaiche, Jacques ULg et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (1999), 57

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See detailHepatitis C virus transmission following invasive medical procedures
Delwaide, Jean ULg; Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Journal of Internal Medicine (1999), 245(1), 107-108

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See detailPrevalence of hepatitis G virus in a haemodialysis unit
Lamproye, Anne ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg et al

in Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica (1999), 62(1), 13-15

Background : Recently, a novel blood-borne virus has been identified and named hepatitis G virus. Transfusion is the main route of transmission. It is known that patients on maintenance dialysis are more ... [more ▼]

Background : Recently, a novel blood-borne virus has been identified and named hepatitis G virus. Transfusion is the main route of transmission. It is known that patients on maintenance dialysis are more susceptible to infections with parenterally-transmitted viruses than the general population. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of hepatitis G infection in a Belgian dialysis unit. Methods: The entire population of our dialysis unit (82 patients) was tested for the presence of hepatitis G virus (HGV) by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. History of transfusion or renal transplantation coinfections with hepatitis B and C viruses, and serum aminotransferase levels were also tested. Results: Thirteen patients (16%) were found positive for HGV-RNA. Among these patients, 69.2% were infected by the G virus alone, 15.4% were coinfected with B virus, and 15.4% with C virus. All but one patient had a history of transfusion. Ten of the thirteen infected patients (77%) had normal aminotransferase (< 30 UI/l). Three patients had elevated aminotransferase levels (23%); one was coinfected with B virus, one with C virus, and the last one had a diabetes-induced fatty liver infiltration. No liver biopsies were performed. Conclusions :It is concluded that infection with C virus is common among dialyzed patients. This high rate of infection could be related to previous transfusions, but may as well be due to nosocomial transmission. In our series, at least one patient has been contaminated by another road than transplantation or transfusion. Finally, it does not appear clearly that chronic infection with hepatitis G virus induces Liver disease, as defined by elevated aminotransferase level. [less ▲]

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See detailHépatite à virus G: mythe ou réalité? VHG/GBV-C: diagnostic, épidémiologie, risque transfusionnel et pathogénicité
Gerard, Christiane ULg; Vaira, Dolorès ULg; Delwaide, Jean ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(9), 524-528

The recently discovered G virus (also called either GBV-C or HGV) is transmitted by blood transfusion as well as by sexual intercourse. The global prevalence of GBV-C is high, not only in those groups ... [more ▼]

The recently discovered G virus (also called either GBV-C or HGV) is transmitted by blood transfusion as well as by sexual intercourse. The global prevalence of GBV-C is high, not only in those groups classically known to be exposed to parenteral risks (i.v. drug users, polytransfused patients), but also in the blood donors population. The diagnosis of active infection lies on the search of GBV-C RNA by Polymerase Chain Reaction whereas that of resolved (past) infection lies on the presence of specific antibodies. Till now, it has not been possible to correlate convincingly the presence of GBV-C RNA with any acute or chronic hepatopathy. On the contrary, a lot of arguments tend to suggest that the GBV-C is not pathogenic for the liver, although some modes of transmission are common with those of other (known and probably not known) hepatotropic viruses. According to the actual knowledge of the consequences of GBV-C infection, it appears as non relevant to instaure a systematic screening of this new virus in blood donors. [less ▲]

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