References of "Twizere, Jean-Claude"
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See detailInteraction of HTLV-1 Tax with minichromosome maintenance proteins accelerates the replication timing program
Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Legros, Sébastien et al

in Blood (2012), 119

The Tax oncoprotein encoded by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) plays a pivotal role in viral persistence and pathogenesis. HTLV-1 infected cells proliferate faster than normal lymphocytes ... [more ▼]

The Tax oncoprotein encoded by the Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) plays a pivotal role in viral persistence and pathogenesis. HTLV-1 infected cells proliferate faster than normal lymphocytes, expand through mitotic division and accumulate genomic lesions. Here, we show that Tax associates with the minichromosome maintenance MCM2-7 helicase complex and localizes to origins of replication. Tax modulates the spatiotemporal program of origin activation and fires supplementary origins at the onset of S phase. Thereby, Tax increases the DNA replication rate, accelerates S phase progression but also generates a replicative stress characterized by the presence of genomic lesions. Mechanistically, Tax favors p300 recruitment and histone hyperacetylation at late replication domains advancing their replication timing in early S phase. [less ▲]

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See detailHost-pathogen interactome mapping for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses.
Simonis, Nicolas; Rual, Jean-Francois; Lemmens, Irma et al

in Retrovirology (2012), 9

BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 both target T lymphocytes, yet induce radically different phenotypic outcomes. HTLV-1 is a causative agent of Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 both target T lymphocytes, yet induce radically different phenotypic outcomes. HTLV-1 is a causative agent of Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), whereas HTLV-2, highly similar to HTLV-1, causes no known overt disease. HTLV gene products are engaged in a dynamic struggle of activating and antagonistic interactions with host cells. Investigations focused on one or a few genes have identified several human factors interacting with HTLV viral proteins. Most of the available interaction data concern the highly investigated HTLV-1 Tax protein. Identifying shared and distinct host-pathogen protein interaction profiles for these two viruses would enlighten how they exploit distinctive or common strategies to subvert cellular pathways toward disease progression. RESULTS: We employ a scalable methodology for the systematic mapping and comparison of pathogen-host protein interactions that includes stringent yeast two-hybrid screening and systematic retest, as well as two independent validations through an additional protein interaction detection method and a functional transactivation assay. The final data set contained 166 interactions between 10 viral proteins and 122 human proteins. Among the 166 interactions identified, 87 and 79 involved HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 -encoded proteins, respectively. Targets for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 proteins implicate a diverse set of cellular processes including the ubiquitin-proteasome system, the apoptosis, different cancer pathways and the Notch signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: This study constitutes a first pass, with homogeneous data, at comparative analysis of host targets for HTLV-1 and -2 retroviruses, complements currently existing data for formulation of systems biology models of retroviral induced diseases and presents new insights on biological pathways involved in retroviral infection. [less ▲]

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See detailInteraction network of antimicrobial peptides of Arabidopsis thaliana, based on hith-throughput yeast two-hybrid screening
Damon, Coralie ULg; Dmitrieva, Joelia Borisnova; Muhovski, Yordan et al

in Plant Physiology & Biochemistry (2012)

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See detailPotentiality of using microbial biosensors for the detection of substrate heterogeneities and the assessment of microbial viability in industrial bioreactors: a complete set of experiments in chemostat and scale-down reactors, and elaboration of a mini scale-down platform
Brognaux, Alison ULg; Neubauer, Peter; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg et al

in Communications in Agricultural and Applied Biological Sciences (2012), 77(1), 3-7

Substrate limitation responsive biosensors have been used in order to detect spatial substrate heterogeneities, , inside industrial bioreactors (whole-cell biosensor). Three green fluorescent protein (GFP ... [more ▼]

Substrate limitation responsive biosensors have been used in order to detect spatial substrate heterogeneities, , inside industrial bioreactors (whole-cell biosensor). Three green fluorescent protein (GFP) transcriptional reporters have been chosen in E.coli, i.e. uspA::gfp, csiE::gfp and yciG::gfp. The promoter uspA is induced in response to a variety of stresses whereas the two other promoters, csiE and yciG, are supposed to be more specific in front of a substrate limitation. The responsiveness of these biosensors has been assessed in chemostat reactor. Secondly, the same biosensors have been tested in well-mixed laboratory reactors and in scale-down reactors able to reproduce industrial conditions. Finally, a mini scale-down platform has been proposed as a high throughput tool to investigate rapidly the usefulness of a given microbial biosensor. Local heterogeneities in mini-bioreactor have caused a decrease of GFP expression, as in scale-down reactor. The presence of GFP in supernatants was noticed and this leakage seems to be correlated with the membrane permeability. [less ▲]

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See detailDisruption of PDZ protein-protein interactions inhibits Tax transformation and HTLV-1 infection capacities.
Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; DEWULF, Jean-François; Blibek, Karim ULg et al

Poster (2011, June 06)

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) encodes a Tax oncoprotein that is critical for both viral replication and cellular transformation. HTLV-1 Tax possesses a PDZ domain binding motif (PBM) at its ... [more ▼]

Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) encodes a Tax oncoprotein that is critical for both viral replication and cellular transformation. HTLV-1 Tax possesses a PDZ domain binding motif (PBM) at its C-terminus that is essential for its transforming activity in a Rat-1 model and for IL-2. Tax has been shown to interact with several PDZ domain containing proteins including PSD-95, Beta1-syntrophin, the precursor of interleukin-16, the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila discs large tumor suppressor protein Dlg, PDLIM2, Lin7, hTid1, Tip1, hScrib and MAGI3. In the 15th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Retroviruses, we will present a specificity map for the Tax/PDZ domain interactions generated using the human ORFeome 5.1. and we will focus on some of the new Tax/PDZ interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of an interactomic map of the Ets factors family: Towards a better understanding of their roles in oncogenic processes
Rambout, Xavier ULg; Simonis, Nicolas; Demoitié, Pauline et al

Poster (2011, April 29)

Ets transcription factors have been involved in several cancers such as leukemia, prostate cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma. They regulate the expression of genes controlling important biological processes such ... [more ▼]

Ets transcription factors have been involved in several cancers such as leukemia, prostate cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma. They regulate the expression of genes controlling important biological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metastasis, and transformation. This family of transcription factors is characterized by its highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the ETS domain and members are classified into subfamilies based on sequence homology criterion. We built a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of the 27 Ets proteins and of their individual functional domains using a high-throughput yeast-two hybrid (Y2H) screening method. That Y2H network was expanded with confident literature-curated PPIs to obtain a comprehensive Ets interaction network. By considering connectivity between Ets interaction partners, we were able to segregate highly connected clusters of proteins from that network. Analysis of ontologies enrichment of those clusters enabled to confirm well-established roles and regulations of Ets factors, but also to suggest new ones. Biological validation of one precise cluster could be used as a rule of a thumb to globally confirm the bioinformatic analysis of our Ets PPI network and the potential physiological or pathological roles and regulation of Ets factors. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of a Brucella spp. secreted effector specifically interacting with human small GTPase Rab2.
de Barsy, Marie; Jamet, Alexandre; Filopon, Didier et al

in Cellular microbiology (2011), 13(7), 1044-58

Bacteria of the Brucella genus are facultative intracellular class III pathogens. These bacteria are able to control the intracellular trafficking of their vacuole, presumably by the use of yet unknown ... [more ▼]

Bacteria of the Brucella genus are facultative intracellular class III pathogens. These bacteria are able to control the intracellular trafficking of their vacuole, presumably by the use of yet unknown translocated effectors. To identify such effectors, we used a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify interactions between putative human phagosomal proteins and predicted Brucella spp. proteins. We identified a specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA. This interaction was confirmed by GST-pull-down with the GDP-bound form of Rab2. A TEM-beta-lactamase-RicA fusion was translocated from Brucella abortus to RAW264.7 macrophages during infection. This translocation was not detectable in a strain deleted for the virB operon, coding for the type IV secretion system. However, RicA secretion in a bacteriological culture was still observed in a DeltavirB mutant. In HeLa cells, a DeltaricA mutant recruits less GTP-locked myc-Rab2 on its Brucella-containing vacuoles, compared with the wild-type strain. We observed altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the B. abortusDeltaricA mutant in HeLa cells, compared with the wild-type control. Altogether, the data reported here suggest RicA as the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus. [less ▲]

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See detailThe HTLV-1 Tax protein inhibits formation of stress granules by interacting with histone deacetylase 6.
Legros, S.; Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Gatot, J. S. et al

in Oncogene (2011)

Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a fatal adult T-cell leukemia. Through deregulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways the viral Tax protein has a pivotal role ... [more ▼]

Human T cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of a fatal adult T-cell leukemia. Through deregulation of multiple cellular signaling pathways the viral Tax protein has a pivotal role in T-cell transformation. In response to stressful stimuli, cells mount a cellular stress response to limit the damage that environmental forces inflict on DNA or proteins. During stress response, cells postpone the translation of most cellular mRNAs, which are gathered into cytoplasmic mRNA-silencing foci called stress granules (SGs) and allocate their available resources towards the production of dedicated stress-management proteins. Here we demonstrate that Tax controls the formation of SGs and interferes with the cellular stress response pathway. In agreement with previous reports, we observed that Tax relocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in response to environmental stress. We found that the presence of Tax in the cytoplasm of stressed cells prevents the formation of SGs and counteracts the shutoff of specific host proteins. Unexpectedly, nuclear localization of Tax promotes spontaneous aggregation of SGs, even in the absence of stress. Mutant analysis revealed that the SG inhibitory capacity of Tax is independent of its transcriptional abilities but relies on its interaction with histone deacetylase 6, a critical component of SGs. Importantly, the stress-protective effect of Tax was also observed in the context of HTLV-1 infected cells, which were shown to be less prone to form SGs and undergo apoptosis under arsenite exposure. These observations identify Tax as the first virally encoded inhibitory component of SGs and unravel a new strategy developed by HTLV-1 to deregulate normal cell processes. We postulate that inhibition of the stress response pathway by Tax would favor cell survival under stressful conditions and may have an important role in HTLV-1-induced cellular transformation.Oncogene advance online publication, 2 May 2011; doi:10.1038/onc.2011.120. [less ▲]

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See detailEstablishment of an interactomic map of the Ets factors family: Towards a better understanding of their roles in oncogenic processes
Rambout, Xavier ULg; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Dequiedt, Franck ULg

in Inserm Workshop: Interactomics: at the crossroads of biology and bioinformatics (2010, March)

Ets transcription factors play key roles in several cancers such as leukemia, prostate cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma. They regulate the expression of genes controlling biological processes such as cellular ... [more ▼]

Ets transcription factors play key roles in several cancers such as leukemia, prostate cancer and Ewing’s sarcoma. They regulate the expression of genes controlling biological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, metastasis, and transformation. This family is characterized by a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (ETS domain) and is classified into subfamilies according to sequence homology between the members. Using a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) method, we tested the interaction of the major splicing variants of the 28 human Ets factors and their functional domains of interest against the last available version of the human ORFeome (hORFeome v5.1). This screen has identified more than 200 new partners of Ets proteins. Further validation of these new interactions together with previously described interactions will enable a global evaluation of the regulation, and normal and cancerous roles of Ets factors. [less ▲]

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See detailNOD2 interactome
Lecat, Aurore ULg; Di Valentin, Emmanuel ULg; Fillet, Marianne ULg et al

Poster (2010, January 28)

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See detailProtein-protein interactions and gene expression regulation in HTLV-1 infected cells.
Legros, Sébastien ULg; Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Dewulf, Jean Francois et al

in Frontiers in Bioscience : A Journal and Virtual Library (2009), 14

Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) propagates in CD4 or CD8 T cells and, after extended latency periods of 30-50 years, causes a rapidly fatal leukemia called adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL ... [more ▼]

Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) propagates in CD4 or CD8 T cells and, after extended latency periods of 30-50 years, causes a rapidly fatal leukemia called adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Infection with HTLV-1 is also associated with a degenerative neuromuscular disease referred to as tropical spastic paraparesis or HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. HTLV genome, in addition to the structural proteins and retroviral enzymes, codes for a region at its 3' end originally designated pX. The products of this region (Tax, Rex, p12I, p13II, p30II and HBZ) play important roles in deregulation of cellular functions by either directly disrupting cellular factors or altering transcription of viral and cellular genes. Here, we will review current knowledge of protein-protein interactions that regulate transcriptional functions of proteins encoded by the pX region. [less ▲]

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See detailProtein Phosphatase 2a Controls The Activity Of Histone Deacetylase 7 During T Cell Apoptosis And Angiogenesis
Martin, Maud ULg; Potente, M.; Janssens, V. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2008), 105(12), 4727-4732

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See detailThe HTLV-1 Tax interactome.
Boxus, Mathieu ULg; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Legros, Sebastien et al

in Retrovirology (2008), 5

The Tax1 oncoprotein encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type I is a major determinant of viral persistence and pathogenesis. Tax1 affects a wide variety of cellular signalling pathways leading to ... [more ▼]

The Tax1 oncoprotein encoded by Human T-lymphotropic virus type I is a major determinant of viral persistence and pathogenesis. Tax1 affects a wide variety of cellular signalling pathways leading to transcriptional activation, proliferation and ultimately transformation. To carry out these functions, Tax1 interacts with and modulates activity of a number of cellular proteins. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge of the Tax1 interactome and propose a rationale for the broad range of cellular proteins identified so far. [less ▲]

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See detailNucleolin binds specifically to an AP-1 DNA sequence and represses AP1-dependent transactivation of the matrix metalloproteinase-13 gene.
Samuel, Shaija; Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Beifuss, Katherine K et al

in Molecular Carcinogenesis (2008), 47(1), 34-46

Transcriptional regulation via activator protein-1 (AP-1) protein binding to AP-1 binding sites within gene promoter regions of AP-1 target genes plays a key role in controlling cellular invasion ... [more ▼]

Transcriptional regulation via activator protein-1 (AP-1) protein binding to AP-1 binding sites within gene promoter regions of AP-1 target genes plays a key role in controlling cellular invasion, proliferation, and oncogenesis, and is important to pathogenesis of arthritis and cardiovascular disease. To identify new proteins that interact with the AP-1 DNA binding site, we performed the DNA affinity chromatography-based Nucleotide Affinity Preincubation Specificity TEst of Recognition (NAPSTER) assay, and discovered a 97 kDa protein that binds in vitro to a minimal AP-1 DNA sequence element. Mass spectrometric fragmentation sequencing determined that p97 is nucleolin. Immunoblotting of DNA affinity-purified material with anti-nucleolin antibodies confirmed this identification. Nucleolin also binds the AP-1 site in gel shift assays. Nucleolin interacts in NAPSTER with the AP-1 site within the promoter sequence of the metalloproteinase-13 gene (MMP-13), and binds in vivo in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in the vicinity of the AP-1 site in the MMP-13 promoter. Overexpression of nucleolin in human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells significantly represses AP-1 dependent gene transactivation of a minimal AP-1 reporter construct and of an MMP-13 promoter reporter sequence. This is the first report of nucleolin binding and transregulation at the AP-1 site. [less ▲]

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See detailCell dynamics and immune response to BLV infection: a unifying model
Florins, Arnaud-Francois ULg; Gillet, Nicolas ULg; Asquith, Becca et al

in Frontiers in Bioscience : A Journal and Virtual Library (2007), 12

Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) is the natural etiological agent of a lymphoproliferative disease in cattle. BLV can also be transmitted experimentally to a related ruminant species, sheep, in which the ... [more ▼]

Bovine Leukemia virus (BLV) is the natural etiological agent of a lymphoproliferative disease in cattle. BLV can also be transmitted experimentally to a related ruminant species, sheep, in which the pathogenesis is more acute. Although both susceptible species develop a strong anti-viral immune response, the virus persists indefinitely throughout life, apparently at a transcriptionally silent stage, at least in a proportion of infected cells. Soon after infection, these humoral and cytotoxic activities very efficiently abolish the viral replicative cycle, permitting only mitotic expansion of provirus-carrying cells. Short term cultures of these infected cells initially indicated that viral expression protects against spontaneous apoptosis, suggesting that leukemia is a process of accumulation of long-lived cells. This conclusion was recently reconsidered following in vivo dynamic studies based on perfusions of nucleoside (bromodeoxyuridine) or fluorescent protein markers (CFSE). In sheep, the turnover rate of infected cells is increased, suggesting that a permanent clearance process is exerted by the immune system. Lymphocyte trafficking from and to the secondary lymphoid organs is a key component in the maintenance of cell homeostasis. The net outcome of the immune selective pressure is that only cells in which the virus is transcriptionally silenced survive and accumulate, ultimately leading to lymphocytosis. Activation of viral and/or cellular expression in this silent reservoir with deacetylase inhibitors causes the collapse of the proviral loads. In other words, modulation of viral expression appears to be curative in lymphocytic sheep, an approach that might also be efficient in patients infected with the related Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1. In summary, a dynamic interplay between BLV and the host immune response modulates a complex equilibrium between (i) viral expression driving (or) favoring proliferation and (ii) viral silencing preventing apoptosis. As conclusion, we propose a hypothetical model unifying all these mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailHuman T-cell leukemia virus type-1 Tax oncoprotein regulates G-protein signaling.
Twizere, Jean-Claude ULg; Springael, Jean-Yves; Boxus, Mathieu ULg et al

in Blood (2007), 109(3), 1051-60

Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and neurological syndromes. HTLV-1 encodes the oncoprotein Tax-1, which modulates viral and cellular gene ... [more ▼]

Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and neurological syndromes. HTLV-1 encodes the oncoprotein Tax-1, which modulates viral and cellular gene expression leading to T-cell transformation. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins known and are involved in the regulation of most biological functions. Here, we report an interaction between HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein and the G-protein beta subunit. Interestingly, though the G-protein beta subunit inhibits Tax-mediated viral transcription, Tax-1 perturbs G-protein beta subcellular localization. Functional evidence for these observations was obtained using conditional Tax-1-expressing transformed T-lymphocytes, where Tax expression correlated with activation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Our data indicated that HTLV-1 developed a strategy based on the activation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in the infected cell; this could have tremendous implications for new therapeutic strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Role For Hpar-1 Kinases Emk And C-Tak1 In Regulating Localization And Activity Of Class Iia Histone Deacetylases
Dequiedt, Franck ULg; Martin, Maud ULg; Von Blume, Julia et al

in Molecular and Cellular Biology (2006), 26(19), 7086-102

Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) are found both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus where they repress genes involved in several major developmental programs. In response to specific signals, the ... [more ▼]

Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) are found both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus where they repress genes involved in several major developmental programs. In response to specific signals, the repressive activity of class IIa HDACs is neutralized through their phosphorylation on multiple N-terminal serine residues and 14-3-3-mediated nuclear exclusion. Here, we demonstrate that class IIa HDACs are subjected to signal-independent nuclear export that relies on their constitutive phosphorylation. We identify EMK and C-TAK1, two members of the microtubule affinity-regulating kinase (MARK)/Par-1 family, as regulators of this process. We further show that EMK and C-TAK1 phosphorylate class IIa HDACs on one of their multiple 14-3-3 binding sites and alter their subcellular localization and repressive function. Using HDAC7 as a paradigm, we extend these findings by demonstrating that signal-independent phosphorylation of the most N-terminal serine residue by the MARK/Par-1 kinases, i.e., Ser155, is a prerequisite for the phosphorylation of the nearby 14-3-3 site, Ser181. We propose that this multisite hierarchical phosphorylation by a variety of kinases allows for sophisticated regulation of class IIa HDACs function. [less ▲]

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