References of "Tunca, Daria"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
See detailAnnotation of Lokangaka Losambe's "Death, Power and Cultural Translation in Wole Soyinka's Death and the King's Horseman"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Routledge Annotated Bibliography of English Studies (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (0 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAnnotation of Marc Delrez's "The Missing Chapter in Janet Frame's Living in the Maniototo"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Routledge Annotated Bibliography of English Studies (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAnnotation of Omar Sougou's Writing Across Cultures: Gender Politics and Difference in the Fiction of Buchi Emecheta
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Routledge Annotated Bibliography of English Studies (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 160 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIdeology in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Purple Hibiscus (2003)
Tunca, Daria ULg

in English Text Construction (2009), 2(1), 121-131

This article focuses on the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus (2003). It examines how religious prejudice is encoded in the account of the book’s autodiegetic ... [more ▼]

This article focuses on the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Purple Hibiscus (2003). It examines how religious prejudice is encoded in the account of the book’s autodiegetic narrator, a fifteen-year-old girl whose father is a violent, extremist Igbo Catholic. Based on a close reading of the text, the essay argues that an analysis of the novel’s use of speech and thought presentation may contribute to the assessment of the main character’s evolving ideological stance. It is suggested that the resulting appraisal of the narrator’s development provides key insights into the interpretation of the book. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 643 (16 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRedressing the "Narrative Balance": Subjection and Subjectivity in Chika Unigwe's On Black Sisters' Street
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Afroeuropa: Journal of AfroEuropean Studies = Revista de Estudios Afroeuropeos = Journal des Etudes Afroeuropénnes (2009), 3(1),

This article examines On Black Sisters’ Street (2009), the second novel by Nigerian-Belgian writer Chika Unigwe. After briefly outlining the pioneering role played by Unigwe’s “Afro-European” fiction in ... [more ▼]

This article examines On Black Sisters’ Street (2009), the second novel by Nigerian-Belgian writer Chika Unigwe. After briefly outlining the pioneering role played by Unigwe’s “Afro-European” fiction in Belgium, the essay argues that the author’s latest book presents its heroines, four African prostitutes working in Antwerp, as individuals caught between two forces: on the one hand, the social and economic pressures that lead to their subjection and, on the other, their wish to satisfy their own aspirations, which relates to the expression of their subjectivity. The article attempts to demonstrate that Unigwe’s novel explores the tension between these poles in at least four different ways: first of all, by using cultural stereotypes in an original manner; secondly, by developing the themes of renaming, slavery and objectification to point to the characters’ exploitation; thirdly, by hinting at the potential role of storytelling in the restoration of the prostitutes’ identity; and finally, by suggesting that the women’s very quest for subjectivity sometimes inadvertently induces their subjection. The essay concludes that Unigwe’s subtle treatment of these issues emphasises the complexity both of the novel’s protagonists and of their relationship with each other. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 209 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLinguistic Counterpoint in Gbenga Agbenugba's Another Lonely Londoner
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Matatu : Journal for African Culture and Society (2009), 36

This essay examines Gbenga Agbenugba’s Another Lonely Londoner (1991), a rarely discussed novel recounting the experiences of a young Nigerian man living in London. The narrative is written in an ... [more ▼]

This essay examines Gbenga Agbenugba’s Another Lonely Londoner (1991), a rarely discussed novel recounting the experiences of a young Nigerian man living in London. The narrative is written in an experimental style mixing English with Nigerian Pidgin, and including elements of Nigerian English, Black British English, Cockney, and Yoruba. By way of introduction, Agbenugba’s work is briefly discussed in relation to the novel that inspired it, Sam Selvon’s The Lonely Londoners (1956). An analysis is then undertaken of the interaction between English and Nigerian Pidgin in Another Lonely Londoner, both in dialogue and in narrative passages, with a view to assessing the impact of the combined use of these languages on possible literary interpretations of the novel. The other codes, varieties, and linguistic influences revealed in the book also receive systematic treatment, and it gradually appears that all these elements combine to produce a complex polyphonic work mirroring the main character’s multifarious identity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn Ambiguous "Freedom Song": Mind-Style in Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's Purple Hibiscus
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Postcolonial Text (2009), 5(1), 1-18

This article attempts a stylistic analysis of Purple Hibiscus (2003), the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Using Roger Fowler's concept of "mind-style" and Halliday and Matthiessen ... [more ▼]

This article attempts a stylistic analysis of Purple Hibiscus (2003), the first novel by Nigerian writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Using Roger Fowler's concept of "mind-style" and Halliday and Matthiessen's functional grammar, the essay examines the language of the book's first-person narrator, a fifteen-year-old girl whose father is a violent Catholic extremist. It is argued that the unveiling of linguistic patterns in her account leads to a deeper understanding of the concepts of freedom and tyranny in the novel. Thus, while the narrator's deceptively simple style initially conceals her prejudices, it gradually grows into a more straightforward type of language as the character liberates herself from her father's authoritarian grip. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 158 (7 ULg)
Full Text
See detailACLALS @ Buckingham Palace: A Cynical Scholar's Report on the Celebration of the Commonwealth's Diamond Anniversary
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Davis, Geoffrey V.; Delrez, Marc; Ledent, Bénédicte (Eds.) ACLALS Newsletter (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
See detailPhonetics
Leroy, Céline ULg; Tunca, Daria ULg

Learning material (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAnnotation of Gerald Gaylard's "Mastering Arachnophobia: The Limits of Self-Reflexivity in African Fiction"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Routledge Annotated Bibliography of English Studies (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (4 ULg)
Full Text
See detailUne thèse de doctorat: "Style beyond Borders: Language in Recent Nigerian Fiction"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Le Journal de BabeLg 25 (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (7 ULg)
See detailBen Okri's Starbook: A Magical Pathway to Reality, or an Enchanted Road to Nowhere?
Tunca, Daria ULg

Conference (2008, February 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (3 ULg)
Full Text
See detailStyle beyond Borders: Language in Recent Nigerian Fiction
Tunca, Daria ULg

Doctoral thesis (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (21 ULg)
Full Text
See detailChimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Pouvelle, Jean; Demarche, Jean-Pierre (Eds.) Guide des littératures d’Irlande et du Commonwealth des origines à nos jours (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail"'Nigeria is Bus is Stage': The Bus as Metaphor in Contemporary Nigerian Fiction"
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Commonwealth : Essays and Studies (2008), 30(2), 35-48

This essay takes as its central argument that the bus can be viewed as a metaphor for the nation in Ben Okri’s "Stars of the New Curfew" and Karen King-Aribisala’s Kicking Tongues. The article unveils the ... [more ▼]

This essay takes as its central argument that the bus can be viewed as a metaphor for the nation in Ben Okri’s "Stars of the New Curfew" and Karen King-Aribisala’s Kicking Tongues. The article unveils the numerous lexical and narrative correspondences between the realms of politics and public transport contained in the texts, and highlights how these associations interact with references to the stage to produce different, yet equally powerful, comments on contemporary Nigerian society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detailOkri, Ben (1959-)
Tunca, Daria ULg

in Juang, Richard M.; Morrissette, Noelle (Eds.) Africa and the Americas: Culture, Politics, and History (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (5 ULg)
Full Text
See detailAfroeuropa in Conversation with Chika Unigwe
Tunca, Daria ULg; Unigwe, Chika

in Afroeuropa: Journal of AfroEuropean Studies = Revista de Estudios Afroeuropeos = Journal des Etudes Afroeuropénnes (2008), 2(1),

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (9 ULg)
Full Text
See detail"Svetski Nigerijci": Nigerijski pisci u dijaspori u dvadeset prvom veku
Tunca, Daria ULg; Cvijanović, Igor

in Mostovi (2008), 143-144

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (11 ULg)