References of "Thonart, Philippe"
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See detailAction des cultures protectrices : cas des germes lactiques sur la flore alimentaire indésirable.
Privat, Kouakou; Thonart, Philippe ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 339-348

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See detailBiochemistry of lactone formation in yeast and fungi and its utilisation for the production of flavour and fragrance compounds
Romero-Guido, C.; Belo, I.; Ta, T. M. N. et al

in Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology (2011), 89

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See detailProduction potentielle de bioéthanol, de biométhane et de pellets à partir des déchets de biomasse lignocellulosique du bananier (Musa spp.) au Cameroun
Kamdem, Irenée ULg; Tomekpe, Kodjo; Thonart, Philippe ULg

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(3), 471-483

Like most African countries who are producers and exporters of banana, Cameroon is facing a major energy deficit. Yet, the country is generating annually about 4,500,000 tons of fresh banana plant ... [more ▼]

Like most African countries who are producers and exporters of banana, Cameroon is facing a major energy deficit. Yet, the country is generating annually about 4,500,000 tons of fresh banana plant lignocellulosic waste biomass matter equivalent to 402,750 tons of dry matter. The dry matter contained about 80,57% organic matter which are not exploited. Under the sustainable development, which is linked to environmental protection, the biotransformation of these residues can potentially produce about 93,800; 92,133; 447,500 tons of bioethanol, biomethane and pellets respectively. The waste transformation could reduce the energy deficit and create jobs opportunities. Productions of this renewable energy or biofuel also constitute a new area which could assure an important source of income for the banana cultivators and the entire country. [less ▲]

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See detailDimensionnement et extrapolation des bioréacteurs sur base de paramètres physiologiques : cas de la production de lipase par Yarrowia lipolytica
Kar, Tambi ULg; Delvigne, Frank ULg; Destain, Jacqueline ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(4), 585-595

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See detailEarthworms smell microorganisms in soil
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Verheggen, François ULg; Mescher, Mark et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailSynthesis by sol-gel process of visible light sensitive-TiO2 for the degradation of pollutants and microorganisms
Tasseroul, Ludivine ULg; Lambert, Stéphanie ULg; Páez Martínez, Carlos ULg et al

Poster (2011)

Since the discovery of photocatalytic decomposition of water on TiO2 electrodes by Fujishima and Honda [1], heterogenous photocatalysis has been widely studied for environmental applications ... [more ▼]

Since the discovery of photocatalytic decomposition of water on TiO2 electrodes by Fujishima and Honda [1], heterogenous photocatalysis has been widely studied for environmental applications. Photocatalytic processes are new technologies for waste water treatment because new compounds (alkanes, pesticides, dyes, etc.) in effluents are not readily degraded by the conventional treatments [2]. Oxidative processes can completely destroy organic pollutants [3] or microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, etc.) [4,5]. At this moment, the commercial Degussa P25 is the mostly used photocatalyst. Nevertheless, it requires UV light to be activated, that is why scientists try to activate TiO2 under visible light. The aim of this study is to synthesize photocatalysts activated by visible light and to evaluate their activity for the degradation of pollutants and microorganisms. The sol-gel process allows the direct introduction of visible light sensitive species like porphyrins inside the TiO2 matrix during the synthesis [6]. Two tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrins are synthesized for the sensitization of TiO2 to visible light : the metal free tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin and the nickel tetracarboxyphenyl porphyrin. These porphyrins are characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR and UV/Vis spectroscopies. They are introduced during the sol-gel synthesis of TiO2 matrix. Diffuse reflectance and FT-IR spectroscopies are used to ensure that porphyrins are incorporated inside the matrix of TiO2. Indeed, characteristic porphyrins peaks appear on spectra. The cristallinity and specific surfaces of catalysts are also determined by XRD and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurements respectively. The depolluting efficiency of photocatalysts is evaluated for the degradation in water of p-nitrophenol, which is listed as one of the 114 organic pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency in the US. After 6 h under visible light, 40 % of p-nitrophenol are degraded with some catalysts. The activity is influenced by i) the presence of porphyrins : the photoactivity increases with the amount of porphyrins ; ii) the nature of porphyrins : nickel porphyrins are more active than free metal porphyrins ; and iii) the crystallinity of catalysts : amorphous catalysts are less active than crystallized samples. The photocatalysts with the highest degradation rating of dyes will be selected for the degradation in water of Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus acidophilus. [1] A. Fujishima, K. Honda, Nature 238, 37-38 (1972) [2] P. Gogate, A. Pandit, Advances in Environmental Research 8, 501-551 (2004). [3] D. Chen, A. Ray, Water Research 32, 3223-3234 (1998) [4] R. Watts, S. Kong, M. Orr, G. Miller, B. Henry, Water Research 29, 95-100 (1995). [5] J. Hong, M. Otaki, Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering 101, 185-189 (2006). [6] C. Wang, J. Li, G. Mele, G.M. Yang, F.-X. Zhang, L. Palmisano, G. Vasapollo, Applied catalysis 78, 218-226 (2007). [less ▲]

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See detailBeneficial effect of the rhizosphere microbial community for plant growth and health.
Nihorimbere, V.; Ongena, Marc ULg; Smargiassi, M. et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 327-337

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See detailApplicability of GFP Microbial Whole Cell Biosensors to Bioreactor Operations : Mathematical Modeling and Related Experimental Tools
Delvigne, Frank ULg; Brognaux, Alison ULg; Gorret, Nathalie et al

in Biosensors : emerging materials and applications (2011)

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See detailHigh-level production of extracellular lipase by Yarrowia lipolytica mutants from methyl oleate
Darvishi, F.; Destain, Jacqueline ULg; Nahvi, I. et al

in New Biotechnology (2011), 28(6), 756-760

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See detailImprovement of the Composition of Tunisian Myrtle Berries (Myrtus 2 communis L.) Alcohol Extracts
Snoussi, A.; Ben haj Koubaier, H.; Essaidi, Ismahen et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2011), 3b2(9),

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See detailEffect of minerals salts in fermentation process using mango residues as carbon source for bioethanol production
Somda, M.; Savadogo, A.; Barro, N. et al

in Asian Journal of Industrial Engineering (2011), 3(1), 29-38

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See detailTechniques de séchage des starters lactiques et mécanismes affectant la viabilité cellulaire suite à la lyophilisation
Coulibaly, Ibourahema ULg; Dubois Dauphin, Robin ULg; Danthine, Sabine ULg et al

in Biotechnologie, Agronomie, Société et Environnement = Biotechnology, Agronomy, Society and Environment [=BASE] (2011), 15(2), 287-299

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See detailThe elicitation of a systemic resistance by Pseudomonas putida BTP1 in tomato involves the stimulation of two lipoxygenase isoforms
Mariutto, Martin ULg; Duby, Franceline ULg; Adam, Akram et al

in BMC Plant Biology (2011), 11

Background Some non-pathogenic rhizobacteria called Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) possess the capacity to induce in plant defense mechanisms effective against pathogens. Precedent studies ... [more ▼]

Background Some non-pathogenic rhizobacteria called Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) possess the capacity to induce in plant defense mechanisms effective against pathogens. Precedent studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida BTP1 to induce PGPR-mediated resistance, termed ISR (Induced Systemic Resistance), in different plant species. Despite extensive works, molecular defense mechanisms involved in ISR are less well understood that in the case of pathogen induced systemic acquired resistance. Results We analyzed the activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and lipoxygenase (LOX), key enzymes of the phenylpropanoid and oxylipin pathways respectively, in tomato treated or not with P. putida BTP1. The bacterial treatment did not stimulate PAL activity and linoleate-consuming LOX activities. Linolenate-consuming LOX activity, on the contrary, was significantly stimulated in P. putida BTP1-inoculated plants before and two days after infection by B. cinerea. This stimulation is due to the increase of transcription level of two isoforms of LOX: TomLoxD and TomLoxF, a newly identified LOX gene. We showed that recombinant TomLOXF preferentially consumes linolenic acid and produces 13-derivative of fatty acids. After challenging with B. cinerea, the increase of transcription of these two LOX genes and higher linolenic acid-consuming LOX activity were associated with a more rapid accumulation of free 13-hydroperoxy-octadecatrienoic and 13-hydroxy-octadecatrienoic acids, two antifungal oxylipins, in bacterized plants. Conclusion In addition to the discovery of a new LOX gene in tomato, this work is the first to show differential induction of LOX isozymes and a more rapid accumulation of 13-hydroperoxy-octadecatrienoic and 13-hydroxy-octadecatrienoic acids in rhizobacteria mediated-induced systemic resistance. [less ▲]

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