References of "Thiry, Julien"
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See detailHerpèsvirose caprine et faux positifs en IBR?
Thiry, Julien ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2008), 285

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See detailInfectious bovine rhinotracheitis
Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Thiry, Julien ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Lefèvre, P. C.; Blancou, J.; Chermette, R. (Eds.) Infectious and parasitic diseases of Livestock (2008)

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See detailRuminant herpesviruses
Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Thiry, Julien ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Lefèvre, P. C.; Blancou, Jean; Chermette, R. (Eds.) Infectious and parasitic diseases of Livestock (2008)

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See detailInfectious bovine rhinotracheitis and the epidemiological role of the other ruminant species
Thiry, Julien ULg; Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja = Hungarian Veterinary Journal (2008), 130(1), 116-123

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See detailUn proche parent du virus de l'IBR circule chez les caprins corses
Thiry, Julien ULg; Chartier, C.; Thiry, Etienne ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2008), 285

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See detailCidofovir is effective against caprine herpesvirus 1 infection in goats
Tempesta, M.; Camero, M.; Bellacicco, A. L. et al

in Antiviral Research (2007), 74(2), 138-141

Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is a virus able to cause genital infection leading to vulvovaginitis or balanoposthitis in adult goats. CpHV-1 shares several biological similarities with herpes simplex ... [more ▼]

Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is a virus able to cause genital infection leading to vulvovaginitis or balanoposthitis in adult goats. CpHV-1 shares several biological similarities with herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2) infection in man, such as genital tropism, type and site of typical lesions and it might provide an animal model for studies on antiviral drugs for HSV-2 infection in man. In this view the efficacy of cidofovir (CDV) drug was tested in six goats intravaginally infected with BA. 1 strain of CpHV-1. Three goats received an intravaginal application of 3 ml of a 1% CDV preparation at 4 h post infection and then every 12 h for five consecutive days. Three goats were kept as untreated controls. The goats were daily examined for clinical evidence of the infection and viral shedding. CDV was able to protect against disease progression and inhibited the onset of the local lesions due to the CpHV-1 replication. Treated animals shed virus for a shorter period (3 days less) and at lower titres than the control animals. CpHV-1 infection in goats may represent an excellent animal model for the study of novel strategies for the treatment of primary genital HSV-2 infection in man. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailLa recombinaison, moteur de diversité chez les alphaherpèsvirus, a de profondes implications médicales
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Meurens, François; Schynts, Frédéric et al

in Bulletin de l'Académie Royale de Médecine de Belgique (2007), 168

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See detailPotent inhibition of genital herpesvirus infection in goats by cidofovir
Tempesta, Maria; Camero, Michele; Bellacicco, Anna Lucia et al

in Antiviral Therapy (2007), 12(6), 977-979

Background: Like human herpesvirus 2 (HHV-2) in humans, infection by caprine herpesvirus 1 in goats is associated with genital lesions, and this provides a unique model to study the efficacy and effects ... [more ▼]

Background: Like human herpesvirus 2 (HHV-2) in humans, infection by caprine herpesvirus 1 in goats is associated with genital lesions, and this provides a unique model to study the efficacy and effects of anti-herpetic drugs. Methods: The antiviral activity of cidofovir was assessed in goats infected experimentally, using various therapeutic protocols. Results: Topic administration of cidofovir 1% cream prevented the onset of virus-induced genital lesions and drastically reduced virus shedding. Conclusion: Cidofovir appears to be a very efficient drug for the prevention of genital lesions caused by an alphaherpesvirus. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolation and Characterisation of a Ruminant Alphaherpesvirus Closely Related to Bovine Herpesvirus 1 in a Free-Ranging Red Deer
Thiry, Julien ULg; Widen, F.; Grégoire, Fabien ULg et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2007), 3

BACKGROUND: The genus Varicellovirus of the Herpesviridae subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae includes a cluster of viruses antigenically and genetically related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1): namely bovine ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The genus Varicellovirus of the Herpesviridae subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae includes a cluster of viruses antigenically and genetically related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1): namely bovine herpesvirus 5 (BoHV-5), bubaline herpesvirus 1 (BuHV-1), caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1), cervid herpesviruses 1 (CvHV-1) and 2 (CvHV-2) and elk herpesvirus 1 (ElkHV-1). Considering the serological relationship between these ruminant alphaherpesviruses, several surveys have studied the occurrence of BoHV-1 related virus infection in wild and domestic ruminant species. In this way, a recent investigation has indicated, in Belgium, a high increase in the serological prevalence of BoHV-1 related virus infection in free-ranging red deer population. In this context, it has been decided to investigate the presence of an alphaherpesvirus spreading in the Belgian free-ranging red deer population. RESULTS: The current study reports the first isolation in a free-ranging red deer of a BoHV-1 closely related virus. The isolate was antigenically, genomically and genetically characterised by comparison with several ruminant alphaherpesvirus. Immunofluorescence assays revealed the isolate was antigenically distinct from bovine and caprine alphaherpesviruses. Similarly, BamHI and BstEII restriction analyses demonstrated the genomic difference between the isolate and the other ruminant alphaherpesviruses. Next, the sequencing of selected parts of UL27 and US8 genes showed a high degree of homologies between each BoHV-1 related ruminant alphaherpesvirus and the isolate. Besides the close relationship between all ruminant alphaherpesviruses, the phylogenetic analysis revealed that the isolate clustered with CvHV-1. CONCLUSION: The first isolation of a virus closely related to BoHV-1 in a free-ranging red deer is reported. Data demonstrate that a CvHV-1 strain, named Anlier, circulates in wild red deer in continental Europe. Anlier strain show consistent differences with the virus isolated from Scottish farmed red deer. All together, these results improve our understanding of ruminant alphaherpesviruses. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical Protection against Caprine Herpesvirus 1 Genital Infection by Intranasal Administration of a Live Attenuated Glycoprotein E Negative Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Vaccine
Thiry, Julien ULg; Tempesta, M.; Camero, M. et al

in BMC Veterinary Research (2007), 3

BACKGROUND: Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is responsible of systemic diseases in kids and genital diseases leading to abortions in goats. CpHV-1 is widespread and especially in Mediterranean countries as ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) is responsible of systemic diseases in kids and genital diseases leading to abortions in goats. CpHV-1 is widespread and especially in Mediterranean countries as Greece, Italy and Spain. CpHV-1 is antigenically and genetically closely related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Taking into account the biological properties shared by these two viruses, we decided in the current study to assess the protection of a live attenuated glycoprotein E (gE) negative BoHV-1 vaccine against a genital CpHV-1 infection in goats. RESULTS: The vaccine was inoculated intranasally twice three weeks apart followed by a subsequent CpHV-1 intravaginal challenge which is the natural route of infection in three goats. To analyse the safety and the efficacy of this marker vaccine, two groups of three goats served as controls: one immunised with a virulent CpHV-1 and one uninoculated until the challenge. Goats were clinically monitored and all sampling procedures were carried out in a blind manner. The vaccine did not induce any undesirable local or systemic reaction and goats did not excrete gE-negative BoHV-1. After challenge, a significant reduction in disease severity was observed in immunised goats. Moreover, goats immunised with either gE-negative BoHV-1 or CpHV-1 exhibited a significant reduction in the length and the peak of viral excretion. Antibodies neutralising both BoHV-1 and CpHV-1 were raised in immunised goats. CONCLUSION: Intranasal application of a live attenuated gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine is able to afford a clinical protection and a reduction of virus excretion in goats challenged by a CpHV-1 genital infection. [less ▲]

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See detailBovine herpesvirus 1 infection and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis
Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Thiry, Julien ULg; Kirten, P. et al

in Veterinary Research (2007), 38(2), 181-209

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine ... [more ▼]

Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1), classified as an alphaherpesvirus, is a major pathogen of cattle. Primary infection is accompanied by various clinical manifestations such as infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, abortion, infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, and systemic infection in neonates. When animals survive, a life-long latent infection is established in nervous sensory ganglia. Several reactivation stimuli can lead to viral re-excretion, which is responsible for the maintenance of BoHV-1 within a cattle herd. This paper focuses on an updated pathogenesis based on a molecular characterization of BoHV-1 and the description of the virus cycle. Special emphasis is accorded to the impact of the latency and reactivation cycle on the epidemiology and the control of BoHV-1. Several European countries have initiated BoHV-1 eradication schemes because of the significant losses incurred by disease and trading restrictions. The vaccines used against BoHV-1 are described in this context where the differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals is of critical importance to achieve BoHV-1 eradication. [less ▲]

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See detailIntraspecific bovine herpesvirus 1 recombinants carrying glycoprotein E deletion as a vaccine marker are virulent in cattle
Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Meurens, F.; Schynts, F. et al

in Journal of General Virology (2006), 87(Pt 8), 2149-2154

Vaccines used in control programmes of Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) utilize highly attenuated BoHV-1 strains marked by a deletion of the glycoprotein E (gE) gene. Since BoHV-1 recombinants are obtained ... [more ▼]

Vaccines used in control programmes of Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) utilize highly attenuated BoHV-1 strains marked by a deletion of the glycoprotein E (gE) gene. Since BoHV-1 recombinants are obtained at high frequency in experimentally coinfected cattle, the consequences of recombination on the virulence of gE-negative BoHV-1 were investigated. Thus, gE-negative BoHV-1 recombinants were generated in vitro from several virulent BoHV-1 and one mutant BoHV-1 deleted in the gC and gE genes. Four gE-negative recombinants were tested in the natural host. All the recombinants were more virulent than the gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine and the gC- and gE-negative parental BoHV-1. The gE-negative recombinant isolated from a BoHV-1 field strain induced the highest severe clinical score. Latency and reactivation studies showed that three of the recombinants were reexcreted. Recombination can therefore restore virulence of gE-negative BoHV-1 by introducing the gE deletion into a different virulence background. [less ▲]

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See detailRecombination in the alphaherpesvirus bovine herpesvirus 1
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Meurens, F. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2006), 113(3-4), 171-177

Herpesviruses are DNA viruses characterized by a low rate of nucleotide substitution. Therefore. other mechanisms must be involved to their evolution, like recombination that can be seen as an essential ... [more ▼]

Herpesviruses are DNA viruses characterized by a low rate of nucleotide substitution. Therefore. other mechanisms must be involved to their evolution, like recombination that can be seen as an essential evolutionary driving force of these viruses. Recombination contributes to the long-term evolution of alphaherpes viruses. It acts also to continuously create new alphaherpesvirus strains. We have used bovine herpesvirus 1 to investigate recombination both within DNA concatemers in infected cells and in vitro and in vivo at the end of the lytic cycle. The following results have been obtained: (i) intramolecular recombination occurs at the level of concatemers and gives rise to genomic segment inversions: (ii) intraspecific recombination occurs frequently both in vitro and in vivo; (iii) interspecific recombination is possible and requires two highly genetically related viruses (iv) only simultaneous or closely separated infections lead to the production of recombinant viruses: (v) recombination between wild-type and glycoprotein defective vaccine virus can produce a glycoprotein defective virus keeping part of the virulence of parental wild-type virus. Recombination, by exchanging genomic segments, may modify the virulence of alphaherpesviruses. It must be carefully assessed for the biosafety of antiviral therapy, alphaherpesvirus-based vectors and live attenuated vaccines. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailA live attenuated glycoprotein E negative bovine herpesvirus 1 vaccine induces a partial cross-protection against caprine herpesvirus 1 infection in goats
Thiry, Julien ULg; Tempesta, M.; Camero, M. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2006, March 31), 113(3-4), 303-308

Taking into account the close antigenic relationship between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1), a live attenuated glycoprotein E (gE) negative BoHV-1 vaccine was assessed in ... [more ▼]

Taking into account the close antigenic relationship between bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) and caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1), a live attenuated glycoprotein E (gE) negative BoHV-1 vaccine was assessed in goats with the aim to protect against CpHV-1 infection. Vaccine safety was evaluated by intranasal inoculation of two groups of goats with either a gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine or a virulent BoHV-1. The length of viral excretion and the peak viral titre were reduced with the gE-negative vaccine. To assess the efficacy, two goats were inoculated intranasally twice 2 weeks apart with a gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine. Four weeks later, immunised and control goats were challenged with CpHV-1. A 2 log(10) reduction in the peak viral titre was observed and the challenge virus excretion lasted 2 days more in immunised than in control goats. These data indicate the safety and the partial efficacy of a live attenuated gE-negative BoHV-1 vaccine intranasally administrated in goats. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailBiological characterization of bovine herpesvirus 1 recombinants possessing the vaccine glycoprotein E negative phenotype
Muylkens, Benoît ULg; Meurens, F.; Schynts, F. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2006), 113(3-4), 283-291

Intramolecular recombination is a frequent event during the replication cycle of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Recombinant viruses frequently arise and survive in cattle after concomitant nasal ... [more ▼]

Intramolecular recombination is a frequent event during the replication cycle of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1). Recombinant viruses frequently arise and survive in cattle after concomitant nasal infections with two BoHV-1 mutants. The consequences of this process, related to herpesvirus evolution, have to be assessed in the context of large use of live marker vaccines based on glycoprotein E (gE) gene deletion. In natural conditions, double nasal infections by vaccine and wild-type strains are likely to occur. This situation might generate virulent recombinant viruses inducing a serological response indistinguishable from the vaccine one. This question was addressed by generating in vitro BoHV-1 recombinants deleted in the gE gene from seven wild-type BoHV-1 strains and one mutant strain deleted in the genes encoding gC and gE. In vitro growth properties were assessed by virus production, one step growth kinetics and plaque size assay. Heterogeneity in the biological properties was shown among the investigated recombinant viruses. The results demonstrated that some recombinants. in spite of their gE minus phenotype, have biological characteristics close to wild-type BoHV-1. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of caprine herpesvirus 1 glycoprotein D gene and its translation product
Keuser, Véronique; Detry, Bruno; Thiry, Julien ULg et al

in Virus Research (2006), 115(2), 112-121

Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV- 1) is responsible of systemic infection in neonatal kids as well as abortion and fertility disorders in adult goats. This virus is closely related to bovine herpesvirus 1 ... [more ▼]

Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV- 1) is responsible of systemic infection in neonatal kids as well as abortion and fertility disorders in adult goats. This virus is closely related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) which causes infectious bovine rhinotracheitis. Glycoprotein D (gD) mediates important functions in alphaherpesviruses and is also a main inummogen. The sequence of CpHV-1 gD gene and the biochemical properties of its translation product were analyzed and compared to those of BoHV-1 and other alphaherpesviruses. A relatively high homology was found between CpHV-1 and BoHV-1 glycoproteins D amino acid sequences (similarity of 68.8%). Moreover, six cysteine residues are conserved by CpHV-1 gD and the other studied alphaherpesviruses. CpHV-1 gD has a molecular mass similar to BoHV-1 gD and contains complex N-linked oligosaccharides. In contrast to the BoHV-1 gD, CpHV-1 gD is expressed as a late protein. In spite of the observed differences which could influence its biological functions, CpHV-1 gD, shares most characteristics with other alphaherpesviruses and especially BoHV-1. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation de la séroprévalence de l'infection à herpèsvirus caprin 1 dans le sud-ouest de l'Europe
Thiry, Julien ULg; Keuser, Véronique; Schynts, Frédéric et al

in Epidémiologie et Santé Animale (2006), 49

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See detailRuminant alphaherpesviruses related to bovine herpesvirus 1.
Thiry, Julien ULg; Keuser, Veronique; Muylkens, Benoît ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2006), 37(2), 169-90

Herpesviruses have mainly co-evolved with their hosts for millions of years. Consequently, different related host species may have been infected by various genetically related herpesviruses. Illustrating ... [more ▼]

Herpesviruses have mainly co-evolved with their hosts for millions of years. Consequently, different related host species may have been infected by various genetically related herpesviruses. Illustrating this concept, several ruminant alphaherpesviruses have been shown to form a cluster of viruses closely related to bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1): namely bovine herpesvirus 5, bubaline herpesvirus 1, caprine herpesvirus 1, cervid herpesviruses 1 and 2 and elk herpesvirus 1. These viruses share common antigenic properties and the serological relationships between them can be considered as a threat to BoHV-1 eradication programmes. BoHV-1 is a herpesvirus responsible for infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, which is a disease of major economic concern. In this article, the genetic properties of these ruminant alphaherpesviruses are reviewed on a comparative basis and the issue of interspecific recombination is assessed. The pathogenesis of these infections is described with emphasis on the host range and crossing of the host species barrier. Indeed, the non bovine ruminant species susceptible to these ruminant alphaherpesviruses may be potential BoHV-1 reservoirs. The differential diagnosis of these related infections is also discussed. In addition, available epidemiological data are used to assess the potential of cross-infection in ruminant populations. A better knowledge of these ruminant alphaherpesvirus infections is essential to successfully control infectious bovine rhinotracheitis. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of antibody response in goats to caprine herpesvirus 1
Tempesta, M.; Greco, G.; Tarsitano, E. et al

in Biologicals (2005), 33(4), 283-287

Serum samples of goats experiencing natural and experimental infections and/or reactivation of caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) were analysed with neutralization and Western blotting (WB) tests. WB ... [more ▼]

Serum samples of goats experiencing natural and experimental infections and/or reactivation of caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) were analysed with neutralization and Western blotting (WB) tests. WB immunological patterns resulted differently and related to neutralizing titers. In serum samples having neutralizing titer 1:2-1:4, antibodies to two proteins of Mw of 150 and 34 kDa were present. Antibodies against several proteins, two of those being characterized by monoclonal antibodies as gB and gC, were visualized by WB in sera having titer >= 1:8. The neutralizing antibody titers and the pattern of antibody reactivity were hypothesized to modulate the reactivation and re-excretion process of CpHV.1. (c) 2005 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailRecombination in alphaherpesviruses
Thiry, Etienne ULg; Meurens, F.; Muylkens, Benoît ULg et al

in Reviews in Medical Virology (2005), 15(2, Mar-Apr), 89-103

Within the Herpesviridae family, Alphaherpesvirinae is an extensive subfamily which contains numerous mammalian and avian viruses. Given the low rate of herpesvirus nucleotide substitution, recombination ... [more ▼]

Within the Herpesviridae family, Alphaherpesvirinae is an extensive subfamily which contains numerous mammalian and avian viruses. Given the low rate of herpesvirus nucleotide substitution, recombination can be seen as an essential evolutionary driving force although it is likely underestimated. Recombination in alphaherpesviruses is intimately linked to DNA replication. Both viral and cellular proteins participate in this recombination-dependent replication. The presence of inverted repeats in the alphaherpesvirus genomes allows segment inversion as a consequence of specific recombination between repeated sequences during DNA replication. High molecular weight intermediates of replication, called concatemers, are the site of early recombination events. The analysis of concatemers, from cells coinfected by two distinguishable alphaherpesviruses provides an efficient tool to study recombination without the bias introduced by invisible or non-viable recombinants, and by dominance of a virus over recombinants. Intraspecific recombination frequently occurs between strains of the same alphaherpesvirus species. Interspecific recombination depends on enough sequence similarity to enable recombination between distinct alphaherpesvirus species. The most important prerequisite for successful recombination is coinfection of the individual host by different virus strains or species. Consequently the following factors affecting the distribution of different viruses to shared target cells need to be considered: dose of inoculated virus, time interval between inoculation of the first and the second virus, distance between the marker mutations, genetic homology, virulence and latency. Recombination, by exchanging genomic segments, may modify the virulence of alphaherpesviruses. It must be carefully assessed for the biosafety of antiviral therapy, alphaherpesvirus-based vectors and live attenuated vaccines. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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