References of "Surdej, Jean"
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See detailOGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137: A Dramatic Repeating Event with the Second Perturbation Predicted by Real-time Analysis
Ryu, Y*-H; Han, C.; Hwang, K*-H et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 723(1), 81-88

We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with ... [more ▼]

We report the result of the analysis of a dramatic repeating gravitational microlensing event OGLE-2009-BLG-092/MOA-2009-BLG-137, for which the light curve is characterized by two distinct peaks with perturbations near both peaks. We find that the event is produced by the passage of the source trajectory over the central perturbation regions associated with the individual components of a wide-separation binary. The event is special in the sense that the second perturbation, occurring ~100 days after the first, was predicted by the real-time analysis conducted after the first peak, demonstrating that real-time modeling can be routinely done for binary and planetary events. With the data obtained from follow-up observations covering the second peak, we are able to uniquely determine the physical parameters of the lens system. We find that the event occurred on a bulge clump giant and it was produced by a binary lens composed of a K- and M-type main-sequence stars. The estimated masses of the binary components are M [SUB]1[/SUB] = 0.69 ± 0.11 M [SUB]sun[/SUB] and M [SUB]2[/SUB] = 0.36 ± 0.06 M [SUB]sun[/SUB], respectively, and they are separated in projection by r [SUB]bottom[/SUB] = 10.9 ± 1.3 AU. The measured distance to the lens is D [SUB]L[/SUB] = 5.6 ± 0.7 kpc. We also detect the orbital motion of the lens system. [less ▲]

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See detailExtra-solar planet imaging: ground vs space based coronagraphs
Hanot, Charles ULg; Absil, Olivier ULg; Boccaletti, A. et al

Conference (2010, October 28)

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has ... [more ▼]

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has allowed direct images of several exoplanetary systems to be taken (cf. HR 8799, Fomalhaut and β Pic). In the near future, several new instruments are going to dramatically improve our sensitivity to exoplanet detection. Among these, SPHERE (Spectro Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet REsearch) at the VLT, MIRI (Mid Infra-Red Instrument) onboard JWST and EPICS at the ELT will be equipped with coronagraphs to reveal faint objects in the vicinity of nearby stars. We made use of the Lyon group (COND) evolutionary models of young (sub-)stellar objects and exoplanets to compare the sensitivities of these different instruments using their estimated coronagraphic profiles. From this comparison, we present a catalogue of targets which are particularly well suited for the different instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst manufactured diamond AGPM vector vortex for the L- and N-bands: metrology and expected performances
Delacroix, Christian ULg; Forsberg, Pontus; Karlsson, Mikael et al

Conference (2010, October 28)

The AGPM (Annular Groove Phase Mask, Mawet et al. 2005) is an optical vectorial vortex coronagraph (or vector vortex) synthesized by a circular subwavelength grating, that is a grating with a period ... [more ▼]

The AGPM (Annular Groove Phase Mask, Mawet et al. 2005) is an optical vectorial vortex coronagraph (or vector vortex) synthesized by a circular subwavelength grating, that is a grating with a period smaller than λ/n (λ being the observed wavelength and n the refractive index of the grating substrate). Since it is a phase mask, it allows to reach a high contrast with a small working angle. Moreover, its subwavelength structure provides a good achromatization over wide spectral bands. Recently, we have manufactured and measured our first N-band prototypes that allowed us to validate the reproducibility of the microfabrication process. Here, we present newly produced mid-IR diamond AGPMs in the N-band (~10 µm), and in the most wanted L-band (~3.5 µm). We first give an extrapolation of the expected coronagraph performances. We then present the manufacturing and measurement results, using diamond-optimized microfabrication techniques such as nano-imprint lithography (NIL) and reactive ion etching (RIE). Finally, the subwavelength grating profile metrology combines surface metrology (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, white light interferometry) with diffractometry on an optical polarimetric bench and cross correlation with theoretical simulations using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA). [less ▲]

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See detailFrequency of Solar-like Systems and of Ice and Gas Giants Beyond the Snow Line from High-magnification Microlensing Events in 2005-2008
Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B. S. et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the "snow line," for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval –4.5 < log q < –2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We ... [more ▼]

We present the first measurement of the planet frequency beyond the "snow line," for the planet-to-star mass-ratio interval –4.5 < log q < –2, corresponding to the range of ice giants to gas giants. We find \endgraf\vbox{\begin{center}$\displaystyle{d^2 N{_{\rm pl}}\over d\log q\, d\log s} = (0.36\pm 0.15)\;{\rm dex}^{-2}$\end{center}}\noindentat the mean mass ratio q = 5 × 10 –4 with no discernible deviation from a flat (Öpik's law) distribution in log-projected separation s. The determination is based on a sample of six planets detected from intensive follow-up observations of high-magnification ( A>200) microlensing events during 2005-2008. The sampled host stars have a typical mass M host ~ 0.5 M sun [less ▲]

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See detailRound table discussion
Coude Du Foresto, V.; Hummel, C. A.; Perrin, G. et al

in Proceedings of the JENAM 2010 Symposium (2010, September 01)

Not Available

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See detailFirst steps in the development of a piston sensor for large aperture space telescopes
Guerri, Géraldine ULg; Roose, Stéphane ULg; Stockman, Yvan ULg et al

in Oschmann, J.; Clampin, M.; MacEwen, H. (Eds.) Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave (2010, July 01)

Nowadays spaceborne missions for astronomy or Earth imaging need high resolution observation which implies the development of large aperture telescopes. This can be achieved by multi-aperture telescopes ... [more ▼]

Nowadays spaceborne missions for astronomy or Earth imaging need high resolution observation which implies the development of large aperture telescopes. This can be achieved by multi-aperture telescopes or large segmented telescopes. One of the major issues is the phasing of the sub-apertures or the segments of such telescopes. A cophasing sensor is therefore mandatory to achieve the ultimate resolution of these telescopes. In this framework, Liège Space Center (CSL) concern is the development of a compact cophasing sensor to phase new large lightweight segmented mirrors for future space telescopes. The sensor concept has its origins in new phase retrieval algorithms which have been recently developed. In this paper, we outline the concept and the experimental validation results of our piston sensor breadboard which is currently under development in our laboratory. Finally, future prospects and further developments of our experiment are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailOGLE 2008-BLG-290: an accurate measurement of the limb darkening of a galactic bulge K Giant spatially resolved by microlensing
Fouqué, P.; Heyrovský, D.; Dong, S. et al

in Astronomy and Astrophysics (2010), 518

Context. Not only is gravitational microlensing a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. <BR ... [more ▼]

Context. Not only is gravitational microlensing a successful tool for discovering distant exoplanets, but it also enables characterization of the lens and source stars involved in the lensing event. <BR /> Aims: In high-magnification events, the lens caustic may cross over the source disk, which allows determination of the angular size of the source and measurement of its limb darkening. <BR /> Methods: When such extended-source effects appear close to maximum magnification, the resulting light curve differs from the characteristic Paczyński point-source curve. The exact shape of the light curve close to the peak depends on the limb darkening of the source. Dense photometric coverage permits measurement of the respective limb-darkening coefficients. <BR /> Results: In the case of the microlensing event OGLE 2008-BLG-290, the K giant source star reached a peak magnification at about 100. Thirteen different telescopes have covered this event in eight different photometric bands. Subsequent light-curve analysis yielded measurements of linear limb-darkening coefficients of the source in six photometric bands. The best-measured coefficients lead to an estimate of the source effective temperature of about 4700[SUP]+100[/SUP][SUB]-200[/SUB] K. However, the photometric estimate from colour-magnitude diagrams favours a cooler temperature of 4200 ± 100 K. <BR /> Conclusions: Because the limb-darkening measurements, at least in the CTIO/SMARTS2 V_s- and I_s-bands, are among the most accurate obtained, the above disagreement needs to be understood. A solution is proposed, which may apply to previous events where such a discrepancy also appeared. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnular groove phase mask coronagraph in diamond for mid-IR wavelengths: manufacturing assessment and performance analysis
Delacroix, Christian ULg; Forsberg, P.; Karlsson, M. et al

in Oschmann, J.; Clampin, M.; MacEwen, H. (Eds.) Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave (2010, July 01)

Phase-mask coronagraphs are known to provide high contrast imaging capabilities while preserving a small inner working angle, which allows searching for exoplanets or circumstellar disks with smaller ... [more ▼]

Phase-mask coronagraphs are known to provide high contrast imaging capabilities while preserving a small inner working angle, which allows searching for exoplanets or circumstellar disks with smaller telescopes or at longer wavelengths. The AGPM (Annular Groove Phase Mask, Mawet et al. 2005[SUP]1[/SUP]) is an optical vectorial vortex coronagraph (or vector vortex) induced by a rotationally symmetric subwavelength grating (i.e. with a period smaller than λ/n, λ being the observed wavelength and n the refractive index of the grating substrate). In this paper, we present our first midinfrared AGPM prototypes imprinted on a diamond substrate. We firstly give an extrapolation of the expected coronagraph performances in the N-band (~10 μm), and prospects for down-scaling the technology to the most wanted L-band (~3.5 μm). We then present the manufacturing and measurement results, using diamond-optimized microfabrication techniques such as nano-imprint lithography (NIL) and reactive ion etching (RIE). Finally, the subwavelength grating profile metrology combines surface metrology (scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, white light interferometry) with diffractometry on an optical polarimetric bench and cross correlation with theoretical simulations using rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA). [less ▲]

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See detailDirect imaging of Earth-like planets: why we care about exozodis
Absil, Olivier ULg; Defrère, D.; Roberge, A. et al

in Danchi, W. C.; Delplancke, F.; Rajagopal, J. K. (Eds.) Optical and Infrared Interferometry II (2010, July)

The presence of large amounts of exozodiacal dust around nearby main sequence stars is considered as a potential threat for the direct detection of Earth-like exoplanets (exoEarths) with future space ... [more ▼]

The presence of large amounts of exozodiacal dust around nearby main sequence stars is considered as a potential threat for the direct detection of Earth-like exoplanets (exoEarths) with future space-based coronagraphic and interferometric missions. In this paper, we estimate the amount of exozodiacal light that can be tolerated around various stellar types without jeopardizing the detection of exoEarths with a space-based visible coronagraph or a free-flying mid-infrared interferometer. We also address the possible effects of resonant structures in exozodiacal disks. We then review the sensitivity of current ground-based interferometric instruments to exozodiacal disks, based on classical visibility measurements and on the nulling technique. We show that the current instrumental performances are not sufficient to help prepare future exoEarth imaging missions, and discuss how new groundor space-based instruments could improve the current sensitivity to exozodiacal disks down to a suitable level. [less ▲]

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See detailThe planar optics phase sensor: a study for the VLTI 2nd generation fringe tracker
Blind, Nicolas; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Absil, Olivier ULg et al

in Danchi, W. C.; Delplancke, F.; Rajagopal, J. K. (Eds.) Optical and Infrared Interferometry II (2010, July)

In a few years, the second generation instruments of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) will routinely provide observations with 4 to 6 telescopes simultaneously. To reach their ultimate ... [more ▼]

In a few years, the second generation instruments of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) will routinely provide observations with 4 to 6 telescopes simultaneously. To reach their ultimate performance, they will need a fringe sensor capable to measure in real time the randomly varying optical paths differences. A collaboration between LAOG (PI institute), IAGL, OCA and GIPSA-Lab has proposed the Planar Optics Phase Sensor concept to ESO for the 2[SUP]nd[/SUP] Generation Fringe Tracker. This concept is based on the integrated optics technologies, enabling the conception of extremely compact interferometric instruments naturally providing single-mode spatial filtering. It allows operations with 4 and 6 telescopes by measuring the fringes position thanks to a spectrally dispersed ABCD method. We present here the main analysis which led to the current concept as well as the expected on-sky performance and the proposed design. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment of a CELestial Infrared Nuller Experiment (CELINE) for broadband nulling and new single-mode fiber testing
Hanot, Charles ULg; Riaud, Pierre; Mawet, Dimitri et al

in Danchi, W. C.; Delpancke, F.; Rajagopal, J. K. (Eds.) Optical and Infrared Interferometry II (2010, July)

he small angular distance (<100 mas) and the huge flux ratio (107) between an Earth-like exoplanet in the socalled habitable zone and its host star makes it very difficult to direct image such systems ... [more ▼]

he small angular distance (<100 mas) and the huge flux ratio (107) between an Earth-like exoplanet in the socalled habitable zone and its host star makes it very difficult to direct image such systems. Nulling interferometry consists of a very powerful technique that combines destructively the light from two or more collectors to dim the starlight and to reveal faint companions in its vicinity. We have developed a new nulling experiment based on the fiber nuller principle. This fully symmetric reflective nulling bench aims at testing broadband nulling in both H and K bands as well as characterizing photonic fibers for modal filtering. We present in this paper the design, the development as well as preliminary results of the experiment. [less ▲]

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See detailCompared sensitivities of VLT, JWST and ELT for direct exoplanet detection in nearby stellar moving groups
Hanot, Charles ULg; Absil, Olivier ULg; Surdej, Jean ULg et al

in Oschmann, J.; Clampin, M.; MacEwen, H. (Eds.) Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2010: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave (2010, July)

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has ... [more ▼]

In the context of exoplanet detection, a large majority of the 400 detected exoplanets have been found by indirect methods. Today, progress in the field of high contrast and angular resolution imaging has allowed direct images of several exoplanetary systems to be taken (cf. HR 8799, Fomalhaut and β Pic).[SUP]1-4[/SUP] In the near future, several new instruments are going to dramatically improve our sensitivity to exoplanet detection. Among these, SPHERE (Spectro Polarimetric High contrast Exoplanet REsearch) at the VLT, MIRI (Mid Infra-Red Instrument) onboard JWST and EPICS at the ELT will be equipped with coronagraphs to reveal faint objects in the vicinity of nearby stars. We made use of the Lyon group (COND) evolutionary models of young (sub-)stellar objects and exoplanets to compare the sensitivities of these different instruments using their estimated coronagraphic profiles. From this comparison, we present a catalogue of targets which are particularly well suited for the different instruments. [less ▲]

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See detailAnnular Groove Phase Mask coronagraph in diamond for mid-IR wavelengths
Delacroix, Christian ULg; Mawet, Dimitri; Surdej, Jean ULg et al

Poster (2010, April 25)

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See detailAn introduction to optical/IR interferometry (PDF file)
Surdej, Jean ULg

Learning material (2010)

Lecture notes of an introductory course on optical/IR interferometry (2010 VLTI School organized on 17-28 April 2010 at Centre IGESA, Porquerolles Island, Côte d'Azur, France). For more information, see ... [more ▼]

Lecture notes of an introductory course on optical/IR interferometry (2010 VLTI School organized on 17-28 April 2010 at Centre IGESA, Porquerolles Island, Côte d'Azur, France). For more information, see http://www.european-interferometry.eu/training/2010 [less ▲]

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See detailThe Optimal Gravitational Lens Telescope
Surdej, Jean ULg; Delacroix, Christian ULg; Coleman, P. et al

in Astronomical Journal (The) (2010), 139

Given an observed gravitational lens mirage produced by a foreground deflector (cf. galaxy, quasar, cluster, . . . ), it is possible via numerical lens inversion to retrieve the real source image, taking ... [more ▼]

Given an observed gravitational lens mirage produced by a foreground deflector (cf. galaxy, quasar, cluster, . . . ), it is possible via numerical lens inversion to retrieve the real source image, taking full advantage of the magnifying power of the cosmic lens. This has been achieved in the past for several remarkable gravitational lens systems. Instead, we propose here to invert an observed multiply imaged source directly at the telescope using an ad-hoc optical instrument which is described in the present paper. Compared to the previous method, this should allow one to detect fainter source features as well as to use such an optimal gravitational lens telescope to explore even fainter objects located behind and near the lens. Laboratory and numerical experiments illustrate this new approach. [less ▲]

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See detailRealisation of a fully-deterministic microlensing observing strategy for inferring planet populations
Dominik, M.; Jørgensen, U. G.; Rattenbury, N. J. et al

in Astronomische Nachrichten (2010), 331

Within less than 15 years, the count of known planets orbiting stars other than the Sun has risen from none to more than 400 with detections arising from four successfully applied techniques: Doppler ... [more ▼]

Within less than 15 years, the count of known planets orbiting stars other than the Sun has risen from none to more than 400 with detections arising from four successfully applied techniques: Doppler-wobbles, planetary transits, gravitational microlensing, and direct imaging. While the hunt for twin Earths is on, a statistically well-defined sample of the population of planets in all their variety is required for probing models of planet formation and orbital evolution so that the origin of planets that harbour life, like and including ours, can be understood. Given the different characteristics of the detection techniques, a complete picture can only arise from a combination of their respective results. Microlensing observations are well-suited to reveal statistical properties of the population of planets orbiting stars in either the Galactic disk or bulge from microlensing observations, but a mandatory requirement is the adoption of strictly-deterministic criteria for selecting targets and identifying signals. Here, we describe a fully-deterministic strategy realised by means of the ARTEMiS (Automated Robotic Terrestrial Exoplanet Microlensing Search) system at the Danish 1.54-m telescope at ESO La Silla between June and August 2008 as part of the MiNDSTEp (Microlensing Network for the Detection of Small Terrestrial Exoplanets) campaign, making use of immediate feedback on suspected anomalies recognized by the SIGNALMEN anomaly detector. We demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of such an approach, and thereby the readiness for studying planet populations down to Earth mass and even below, with ground-based observations. While the quality of the real-time photometry is a crucial factor on the efficiency of the campaign, an impairment of the target selection by data of bad quality can be successfully avoided. With a smaller slew time, smaller dead time, and higher through-put, modern robotic telescopes could significantly outperform the 1.54-m Danish, whereas lucky-imaging cameras could set new standards for high-precision follow-up monitoring of microlensing events. Based on data collected by the MiNDSTEp consortium with the Danish 1.54-m telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. [less ▲]

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See detailHST Observations of Gravitationally Lensed QSOs
Claeskens, Jean*-François; Sluse, Dominique; Surdej, Jean ULg

in Macchetto, D. F. (Ed.) The Impact of HST on European Astronomy (2010)

Thanks to its sharp view, HST has significantly improved our knowledge of tens of gravitationally lensed quasars in four different respects: (1) confirming their lensed nature; (2) detecting the lensing ... [more ▼]

Thanks to its sharp view, HST has significantly improved our knowledge of tens of gravitationally lensed quasars in four different respects: (1) confirming their lensed nature; (2) detecting the lensing galaxy responsible for the image splitting; (3) improving the astrometric accuracy on the positions of the unresolved QSO images and of the lens; (4) resolving extended lensed structures from the QSO hosts into faint NIR or optical rings or arcs. These observations have helped to break some degeneracies on the lens potential, to probe the galaxy evolution and to reconstruct the true shape of the QSO host with an increased angular resolution. [less ▲]

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See detailFrequency of Solar-Like Systems and Planet Mass-Ratio Distribution Function Beyond the Snow Line from High-Magnification Microlensing Events
Gould, A.; Dong, S.; Gaudi, B~S et al

in Astrophysical Journal (2010), 720

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