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See detailProlactin/growth hormone-derived antiangiogenic peptides highlight a potential role of tilted peptides in angiogenesis
Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Lins, Laurence ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2006), 103(39), 14319-14324

Angiogenesis is a crucial step in many pathologies, including tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we show that tilted peptides exert antiangiogenic activity. Tilted (or oblique-oriented) peptides are short ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis is a crucial step in many pathologies, including tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we show that tilted peptides exert antiangiogenic activity. Tilted (or oblique-oriented) peptides are short peptides known to destabilize membranes and lipid cores and characterized by an asymmetric distribution of hydrophobic residues along the axis when helical. We have previously shown that 16-kDa fragments of the human prolactin/growth hormone (PRL/GH) family members are potent angiogenesis inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate that all these fragments possess a 14-aa sequence having the characteristics of a tilted peptide. The tilted peptides of human prolactin and human growth hormone induce endothelial cell apoptosis, inhibit endothelial cell proliferation, and inhibit capillary formation both in vitro and in vivo. These antiangiogenic effects are abolished when the peptides' hydrophobicity gradient is altered by mutation. We further demonstrate that the well known tilted peptides of simian immunodeficiency virus gp32 and Alzheimer's beta-amyloid peptide are also angiogenesis inhibitors. Taken together, these results point to a potential new role for tilted peptides in regulating angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic factor, 16-kDa human prolactin, induces endothelial cell cycle arrest by acting at both the G(0)-G(1) and the G(2)-M phases
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Cornet, Anne ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2005), 19(7), 1932-1942

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor that has been shown to prevent tumor growth in a xenograph mouse model. In this paper we first demonstrate ... [more ▼]

The 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor that has been shown to prevent tumor growth in a xenograph mouse model. In this paper we first demonstrate that 16K hPRL inhibits serum-induced DNA synthesis in adult bovine aortic endothelial cells. This inhibition is associated with cell cycle arrest at both the G(0)-G(1) and the G(2)-M phase. Western blot analysis revealed that 16K hPRL strongly decreases levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1, but not cyclin E. The effect on cyclin D1 is at least partially transcriptional, because treatment with 16K hPRL both reduces the cyclin D1 mRNA level and down-regulates cyclin D1 promoter activity. This regulation may be due to inhibition of the MAPK pathway, but it is independent of the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta pathway. Lastly, 16K hPRL induces the expression of negative cell cycle regulators, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1). In summary, 16K hPRL inhibits serum-induced proliferation of endothelial cells through combined effects on positive and negative regulators of cell cycle progression. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for a role of prolactin fragments in corpus luteum function
Ricken, A.; Merkwitz, C.; Struman, Ingrid ULg et al

in The society for the study of reproduction Annual meeeting, Quebec 2005 (2005)

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See detailCathepsin D processes human prolactin into multiple 16K-like N-terminal fragments: Study of their antiangiogenic properties and physiological relevance
Piwnica, David; Touraine, Philippe; Struman, Ingrid ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2004), 18(10), 2522-2542

16K prolactin (PRL) is the name given to the 16-kDa N-terminal fragment obtained by proteolysis of rat PRL by tissue extracts or cell lysates, in which cathepsin D was identified as the candidate protease ... [more ▼]

16K prolactin (PRL) is the name given to the 16-kDa N-terminal fragment obtained by proteolysis of rat PRL by tissue extracts or cell lysates, in which cathepsin D was identified as the candidate protease. Based on its antiangiogenic activity, 16K PRL is potentially a physiological inhibitor of tumor growth. Full-length human PRL ( hPRL) was reported to be resistant to cathepsin D, suggesting that antiangiogenic 16K PRL may be physiologically irrelevant in humans. In this study, we show that hPRL can be cleaved by cathepsin D or mammary cell extracts under the same conditions as described earlier for rat PRL, although with lower efficiency. In contrast to the rat hormone, hPRL proteolysis generates three 16K-like fragments, which were identified by N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry as corresponding to amino acids 1 - 132 ( 15 kDa), 1 - 147 (16.5 kDa), and 1 - 150 ( 17 kDa). Biochemical and mutagenetic studies showed that the species-specific digestion pattern is due to subtle differences in primary and tertiary structures of rat and human hormones. The antiangiogenic activity of N-terminal hPRL fragments was assessed by the inhibition of growth factor-induced thymidine uptake and MAPK activation in bovine umbilical endothelial cells. Finally, an N-terminal hPRL fragment comigrating with the proteolytic 17-kDa fragment was identified in human pituitary adenomas, suggesting that the physiological relevance of antiangiogenic N-terminal hPRL fragments needs to be reevaluated in humans. [less ▲]

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See detailMolecular targeting of antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL inhibits oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice
Pan, H.; Nguyen, Ngoc-Quynh-Nhu ULg; Yoshida, H. et al

in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science (2004), 45(7), 2413-2419

PURPOSE. To examine the ability and mechanism of the 16 kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) in the inhibition of abnormal retinal neovascularization. METHODS. The 16K hPRL-encoding ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE. To examine the ability and mechanism of the 16 kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) in the inhibition of abnormal retinal neovascularization. METHODS. The 16K hPRL-encoding sequence was inserted into an adenoviral vector (16K-Ad). Western blot analysis verified the expression of 16K hPRL and inhibition of proliferation, confirming functional activity of the 16K hPRL in virus-infected adult bovine aortic endothelial (ABAE) cells. 16K hPRL inhibited retinal neovascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. The ability of recombinant 16K hPRL expressed in E. coli (r16K hPRL) was compared to that of endostatin in inducing apoptosis of cultured human retinal endothelial cells (HREC). RESULTS. 16K was expressed in virus-infected ABAE cells and resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Eyes injected with 16K-Ad showed a reduction in preretinal neovascularization of 82.3 +/- 9.3% (P < 0.00001) when compared to uninjected controls. r16K hPRL was 100 times more potent than endostatin in inducing apoptosis in HRECs. CONCLUSIONS. Intravitreal administration of 16K hPRL inhibited neovascularization in the mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy. 16K hPRL stimulated apoptosis in HRECs and inhibited cell proliferation in ABAE cells. These results suggested a potential therapeutic role for 16K hPRL in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic factor 16K human prolactin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis by a mechanism that requires activation of nuclear factor-kappa B
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Sorlet, C. M.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise ULg et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2003), 17(9), 1815-1823

We have previously shown that the 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) has antiangiogenic properties, including the ability to induce apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells. Here, we ... [more ▼]

We have previously shown that the 16-kDa N-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) has antiangiogenic properties, including the ability to induce apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells. Here, we examined whether the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling pathway was involved in mediating the apoptotic action of 16K hPRL in bovine adrenal cortex capillary endothelial cells. In a dose-dependent manner, treatment with 16K hPRL induced inhibitor kappaB-alpha degradation permitting translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus and reporter gene activation. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation by overexpression of a nondegradable inhibitor kappaB-alpha mutant or treatment with NF-kappaB inhibitors blocked 16K hPRL-induced apoptosis. Treatment with 16K hPRL activated the initiator caspases-8 and -9 and the effector caspase-3, all of which were essential for stimulation of DNA fragmentation. This activation of the caspase cascade by 16K hPRL was also NF-kappaB dependent. These findings support the conclusion that NF-kappaB signaling plays a central role in 16K hPRL-induced apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells. [less ▲]

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See detail16K hPRL prevents angiogenesis by inducing both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of endothelial cells
Tabruyn, Sébastien ULg; Sorlet, Catherine; Georges, Angélique et al

Poster (2003)

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See detailExpression of the antiangiogenic factor 16K hPRL in human HCT116 colon cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in Rag1(-/-) mice
Bentzien, F.; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Martini, J. F. et al

in Cancer Research (2001), 61(19), 7356-62

The M(r) 16,000 NH(2)-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor inhibiting endothelial cell function in vitro and neovascularization in vivo. The present study was ... [more ▼]

The M(r) 16,000 NH(2)-terminal fragment of human prolactin (16K hPRL) is a potent antiangiogenic factor inhibiting endothelial cell function in vitro and neovascularization in vivo. The present study was undertaken to test the ability of 16K hPRL to inhibit the growth of human HCT116 colon cancer cells transplanted s.c. into Rag1(-/-) mice. For this purpose, HCT116 cells were stably transfected with an expression vector encoding a peptide that included the signal peptide and first 139 amino acid residues of human prolactin (HCT116(16K)). Stable clones of HCT116(16K) cells secreted large amounts of biologically active 16K hPRL into the culture medium. Growth of HCT116(16K) cells in vitro was not different from wild-type HCT116 (HCT116(wt)) or vector-transfected HCT116 (HCT116(vector)) cells. Addition of recombinant 16K hPRL had no effect on the proliferation of HCT116(wt) cells in vitro. Tumor growth of HCT116(16K) cells implanted into Rag1(-/-) mice was inhibited 63% in four separate experiments compared with tumors formed from HCT116(wt) or HCT116(vector) cells. Inhibition of tumor growth of HCT116(16K) cells was correlated with a decrease in microvascular density by 44%. These data demonstrate that biologically active 16K hPRL can be expressed and secreted from human colon cancer cells using a gene transfer approach and that production of 16K hPRL by these cells was capable of inhibiting tumor growth and neovascularization. These findings support the potential of 16K hPRL as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of colorectal cancer. [less ▲]

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See detailThe antiangiogenic factor 16K PRL induces programmed cell death in endothelial cells by caspase activation
Martini, J. F.; Piot, C.; Humeau, L. M. et al

in Molecular Endocrinology (2000), 14(10), 1536-49

We asked whether the antiangiogenic action of 16K human PRL (hPRL), in addition to blocking mitogen-induced vascular endothelial cell proliferation, involved activation of programmed cell death. Treatment ... [more ▼]

We asked whether the antiangiogenic action of 16K human PRL (hPRL), in addition to blocking mitogen-induced vascular endothelial cell proliferation, involved activation of programmed cell death. Treatment with recombinant 16K hPRL increased DNA fragmentation in cultured bovine brain capillary endothelial (BBE) and human umbilical vein endothelial (HUVE) cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion, independent of the serum concentration. The activation of apoptosis by 16K hPRL was specific for endothelial cells, and the activity of the peptide could be inhibited by heat denaturation, trypsin digestion, and immunoneutralization, but not by treatment with the endotoxin blocker, polymyxin-B. 16K hPRL-induced apoptosis was correlated with the rapid activation of caspases 1 and 3 and was blocked by pharmacological inhibition of caspase activity. Caspase activation was followed by inactivation of two caspase substrates, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and the inhibitor of caspase-activated deoxyribonuclease (DNase) (ICAD). Furthermore, 16K hPRL increased the conversion of Bcl-X to its proapoptotic form, suggesting that the Bcl-2 protein family may also be involved in 16K hPRL-induced apoptosis. These findings support the hypothesis that the antiangiogenic action of 16K hPRL includes the activation of programmed cell death of vascular endothelial cells. [less ▲]

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See detailProteolytic cleavage confers nitric oxide synthase inducing activity upon prolactin
Corbacho, A. M.; Nava, G.; Eiserich, J. P. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2000), 275(18), 13183-6

Prolactin (PRL), originally associated with milk secretion, is now known to possess a wide variety of biological actions and diverse sites of production beyond the pituitary. Proteolytic cleavage is a ... [more ▼]

Prolactin (PRL), originally associated with milk secretion, is now known to possess a wide variety of biological actions and diverse sites of production beyond the pituitary. Proteolytic cleavage is a common post-translational modification that can either activate precursor proteins or confer upon the peptide fragment unique biological actions not exerted by the parent molecule. Recent studies have demonstrated that the 16-kDa N-terminal proteolytic cleavage product of PRL (16K-PRL) acts as a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. Despite previous demonstrations of 16K-PRL production in vivo, biological functions beyond its antiangiogenic actions remain unknown. Here we show that 16K-PRL, but not full-length PRL, acts to promote the expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nitric oxide (*NO) production by pulmonary fibroblasts and alveolar type II cells with potency comparable with the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta, interferon gamma, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The differential effect of 16K-PRL versus PRL occurs through a receptor distinct from known PRL receptors. Additionally, pulmonary fibroblasts express the PRL gene and endogenously produce 16K-PRL, suggesting that this pathway may serve both autocrine and paracrine roles in the regulation of *NO production. These results reveal that proteolytic cleavage of PRL confers upon this classical hormone potent iNOS inducing activity, suggesting its role in inflammatory/immune processes. [less ▲]

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See detailOpposing Actions of Intact and N-Terminal Fragments of the Human Prolactin/Growth Hormone Family Members on Angiogenesis: An Efficient Mechanism for the Regulation of Angiogenesis
Struman, Ingrid ULg; Bentzien, F.; Lee, H. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (1999), 96(4), 1246-51

Angiogenesis, the process of development of a new microvasculature, is regulated by a balance of positive and negative factors. We show both in vivo and in vitro that the members of the human prolactin ... [more ▼]

Angiogenesis, the process of development of a new microvasculature, is regulated by a balance of positive and negative factors. We show both in vivo and in vitro that the members of the human prolactin/growth hormone family, i.e., human prolactin, human growth hormone, human placental lactogen, and human growth hormone variant are angiogenic whereas their respective 16-kDa N-terminal fragments are antiangiogenic. The opposite actions are regulated in part via activation or inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. In addition, the N-terminal fragments stimulate expression of type 1 plasminogen activator inhibitor whereas the intact molecules have no effect, an observation consistent with the fragments acting via separate receptors. The concept that a single molecule encodes both angiogenic and antiangiogenic peptides represents an efficient model for regulating the balance of positive and negative factors controlling angiogenesis. This hypothesis has potential physiological importance for the control of the vascular connection between the fetal and maternal circulations in the placenta, where human prolactin, human placental lactogen, and human growth hormone variant are expressed. [less ▲]

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See detailDesign and characterization of novel forms of human 16K prolactin, an antiangiogenic factor
Mainfroid, Véronique; Struman, Ingrid ULg; Weiner, Richard I. et al

Poster (1998, January)

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