References of "Stevenaert, Achille"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailEfectos antitumorales de los agonistas dopaminergicos y de los anàlogos de la somatostatina
Valdes Socin, Hernan Gonzalo ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

in Revista Argentina de Endocrinologia y Metabolismo (1999), 36(4), 234-246

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
See detailL’acromégalie et son impact sur la fonction reproductrice
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Glunaïkeia (1999), 4(8), 212-218

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromégalie : Examens complémentaires
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 51

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromegalie : Onderzoeken
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 51

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromegalie : Differentiaal-diagnose
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 50

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromégalie : Diagnostic différentiel
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 50

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn unusual pituitary pathology
Petrossians, Patrick ULg; Delvenne, Philippe ULg; Flandroy, P. et al

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1998), 83(10), 3454-3458

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe burden of illness of hypopituitary adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Hakkaart-van Roijen, L.; Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg et al

in PharmacoEconomics (1998), 14(4), 395-403

Objective: The negative metabolic and psychosocial consequences of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults are now well established. In the present study, an attempt was made to quantify the burden of ... [more ▼]

Objective: The negative metabolic and psychosocial consequences of growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults are now well established. In the present study, an attempt was made to quantify the burden of illness, in terms of lost productivity and increased medical consumption, associated with hypopituitarism and untreated GHD. Design and Setting: The study population consisted of 129 Belgian adults with untreated GHD associated with hypopituitarism after pituitary surgery. The Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess health status, and the Health and Labour Questionnaire was used to measure production losses and labour performance. Data on medical consumption were also collected. Main Outcome Measures and Results: Hypopituitary patients reported a lower health status than that of the general population in all but two dimensions of the SF-36 (pain and physical functioning). Nearly 11% of the patients reported being incapacitated for paid employment due to health problems, compared with 4.8% of the general Belgian population. Patients in paid employment reported a mean of 19.8 days of sickness leave per year, which is twice that in the general population. The annual number of visits to general practitioners and specialists was also higher in the patients (9.6 and 6.5 visits, respectively, for the patients compared with corresponding figures of 2.1 and 1.5 for the general Belgian population). The average annual number of days spent in hospital was 3.5 for the patients compared with 2.3 in the general population. The annual healthcare costs and costs due to production losses calculated for hypopituitary patients who had received pituitary surgery amounted to 135 024 Belgian francs (BeF) or $US4340 (1995 values). This compares with the mean annual cost per person for the Belgian population as a whole of BeF68 569 or $US2204. Conclusions: Hypopituitary patients with untreated GHD therefore have a higher cost to society in terms of lost production and medical consumption than the average Belgian population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromegalie : Consult
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 49

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 ULg)
See detailAcromégalie : Consultation
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in Medical News (1998), 49

Detailed reference viewed: 9 (0 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalyse des facteurs pronostiques des gliomes cérébraux
Kaschten, Bruno ULg; Dubuisson, Annie ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

Conference (1998, March 14)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 ULg)
See detailOverview of presurgical somatostatin analog treatment in acromegaly
Beckers, Albert ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg

in IV european Congress of Endocrinology - Abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 3 (0 ULg)
See detailInsuffisance hypophysaire et amaurose subaiguës causées par une pseudotumeur inflammatoire extensive du sinus sphénoïde
Hansen, Isabelle ULg; Petrossians, Patrick ULg; Flandroy, Pierre et al

in XVI Congrès de la Société Française d'Endocrinologie - Abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 ULg)
See detailPresurgical octreotide treatment in acromegaly
Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Beckers, Albert ULg

in 5th International Pituitary congress - abstract book (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 4 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPreoperative evaluation of 54 gliomas by PET with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose and/or carbon-11-methionine.
Kaschten, Bruno ULg; Stevenaert, Achille ULg; Sadzot, Bernard ULg et al

in Journal of Nuclear Medicine : Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine (1998), 39(5), 778-85

This study evaluates the usefulness of PET for the preoperative evaluation of brain gliomas and methods of quantification of PET results. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with brain gliomas were studied by ... [more ▼]

This study evaluates the usefulness of PET for the preoperative evaluation of brain gliomas and methods of quantification of PET results. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with brain gliomas were studied by PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) (n = 45) and/or 11C-methionine (MET) (n = 41) before any treatment. Results of visual analysis, calculation of glucose consumption and five tumor-to-normal brain ratios for both tracers were correlated with two histologic grading systems and with follow-up. RESULTS: Visual analysis (for FDG) and tumor-to-mean cortical uptake (T/MCU) ratio proved to be the best tools for the evaluation of PET results. Methionine was proven to be better than FDG at delineating low-grade gliomas. Tumor-to-mean cortical uptake ratios for FDG and MET were clearly correlated (r = 0.78), leading to the equation T/MCU(FDG) = 0.4 x T/MCU(MET). We showed a good correlation between FDG PET and histologic grading. MET uptake could not differentiate between low-grade and anaplastic astrocytomas but was significantly increased in glioblastomas. Low-grade oligodendrogliomas exhibited high uptake of FDG and MET, probably depending more on oligodendroglial cellular differentiation than on proliferative potential. Uptake was decreased in anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, probably due to dedifferentiation. Care must be taken with peculiar histologic subgroups, i.e., juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, because of a discrepancy between high PET metabolism and low proliferative potential (good prognosis). Both tracers proved useful for the prediction of survival prognosis. Methionine proved slightly superior to FDG for predicting the histologic grade and prognosis of gliomas, despite the impossibility of differentiation between Grades II and III astrocytomas with MET. This superiority of MET could be explained by patient sampling (low number of Grade III gliomas submitted to examination with both tracers). The combination of both tracers improved the overall results compared to each tracer alone. CONCLUSION: Both tracers are useful for the prediction of the histologic grade and prognosis. The apparent superiority of MET over FDG could be due to the small number of Grade III gliomas studied with both tracers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (2 ULg)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPredegenerated Nerve Allografts Versus Fresh Nerve Allografts in Nerve Repair
Dubuisson, A. S.; Foidart-Dessalle, Marguerite ULg; Reznik, Michel ULg et al

in Experimental Neurology (1997), 148(1), 378-87

This study reevaluated the possibility of using predegenerated nerves as donor nerve allografts for nerve repair and compared the results of functional recovery to those obtained after standard, fresh ... [more ▼]

This study reevaluated the possibility of using predegenerated nerves as donor nerve allografts for nerve repair and compared the results of functional recovery to those obtained after standard, fresh nerve allograft repair. Twenty donor rats underwent a ligature/ section of the left sciatic nerve 4 weeks before nerve graft harvesting. Forty recipient rats underwent severing of the left sciatic nerve leaving a 15-mm gap between the nerve stumps. Graft repair was undertaken using either the predegenerated left sciatic nerve of the 20 donor rats (predegenerated group, 20 recipient rats) or the normal right sciatic nerve of the 20 donor rats (fresh group, 20 recipient rats). Recovery of function was assessed by gait analysis, electrophysiologic testing and histologic studies. Walking tracks measurements at 2 and 3 months, electromyography parameters at 2 and 3 months, peroperative nerve conduction velocity and nerve action potential amplitude measurements at 3 months, as well as assessments of myelinated nerve fiber density and surface of myelination showed that fresh and predegenerated nerve grafts induced a comparable return of function although there was some trend in higher electrophysiologic values in the predegenerated group. The only slight but significant difference was a larger mean nerve fiber diameter in the nerve segment distal to a predegenerated nerve graft compared to a fresh nerve graft. Although our study does not show a dramatic long-term advantage for predegenerated nerve grafts compared to fresh nerve grafts, their use as prosthetic material is encouraging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTwo years of replacement therapy in adults with growth hormone deficiency.
Verhelst, J.; Abs, R.; Vandeweghe, M. et al

in Clinical Endocrinology (1997), 47(4), 485-494

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Although several studies have shown beneficial short-term effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in adult GH deficient (GHD) patients, few data are available on large groups of patients treated for more than one year. In addition, the optimal dose of rhGH for each patient and the baseline parameters that predict which patients will benefit most from therapy or will have adverse events are not entirely elucidated. DESIGN: 148 adult GHD patients were enrolled in a multicentre 2-year rhGH replacement study which was placebo controlled for the first six months. rhGH (Genotropin/Genotonorm Pharmacia & Upjohn) was given in a dose of 0.25 IU/kg/week sc (1.5 IU/m2/day). MEASUREMENTS: Every 3-6 months body composition was measured using body impedance analysis and general well being was assessed using the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and social self-reporting questionnaire. At the same time patients had a full clinical examination and blood was sampled for glucose, HbA1c, IGF-1, creatinine, full blood count, thyroid hormones and liver function tests. RESULTS: With rhGH therapy IGF-1 levels increased from -2.00 +/- 2.60 SDS to 1.47 +/- 2.6 SDS after six months (P < 0.001), continued to rise despite no change in dose to 1.84 +/- 2.8 SDS after one year and remained constant thereafter (1.98 +/- 2.4 after 2 years). 56% of patients ultimately attained supranormal IGF-1 levels (+2 SD), 22% had levels below the mean, of which 9% were below -2 SD. Within 3 months lean body mass (LBM) increased by +5.09% (P < 0.001), total body water (TBW) by +5.40% (P < 0.001), while body fat (BF) dropped by -10.89% (P < 0.001) and waist circumference by -1.42% (P < 0.004). These effects were maintained during the first year of therapy, but the effect was attenuated after 24 months: LBM, +3.91% (P < 0.001); TBW, +3.28%, P < 0.001, BF, -6.42% (P < 0.001) and waist -2.22% (P < 0.009). Individual differences in response were large and could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters, except for a better response in males. Treatment resulted in a large and progressive improvement on the NHP scale, especially energy, emotions and sleep, but a similar change was also found in patients during placebo treatment. With rhGH the number of full days of sick leave/6 months decreased from 12.17 +/- 3.90 days (SEM) to 7.15 +/- 3.50 days after six months (P = 0.009), 2.93 +/- 1.55 days after 12 months (P = 0.01), 0.39 +/- 0.17 days after 18 months (P < 0.001) and 3.3 +/- 2.51 days after 24 months (P = 0.026). Similarly, the hospitalization rate went down from 14.9 to 7% after 6 months and remained at this level thereafter (P = 0.12). About one third of patients on rhGH experienced fluid-related adverse events, most often within the first 3 months. They usually disappeared spontaneously or responded well to dose reduction. Cumulative dropout rates were 29% after 1 year and 38% after two years. Two thirds of these patients stopped treatment because of insufficient subjective improvement. Neither drop-outs nor fluid retention could not be predicted by any of the baseline parameters. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed in a large group of patients the beneficial effects of rhGH therapy on body composition, metabolic parameters and general well-being and found a consistent drop in number of sick days and hospitalization rate. These effects were maintained during two years of therapy, except for an attenuation in body composition changes after 24 months. The high incidence of fluid-related adverse events suggests that it may be better to start with lower doses of rhGH and to increase the dose more slowly over a number of weeks. The finding of suboptimal high or low IGF-1 levels in many patients reinforces guidelines not to give rhGH in a weight-dependent dose but to titrate it individually for each patient. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
See detailLe pied tombant (foot drop). Un problème de diagnostic différentiel
Dubuisson, Annie ULg; Martin, Didier ULg; Lenelle, Jacques ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1997), 52(5), 355-62

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (7 ULg)