References of "Soyeurt, Hélène"
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See detailLa terre ferme
Favre, Juliette; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Drones, GPS, robots, QR codes et autres lampes LED gagnent du terrain dans les fermes belges. Tandis que certains agriculteurs se réjouissent de cette vague technologique et voient déjà pointer une ... [more ▼]

Drones, GPS, robots, QR codes et autres lampes LED gagnent du terrain dans les fermes belges. Tandis que certains agriculteurs se réjouissent de cette vague technologique et voient déjà pointer une troisième révolution agricole, d’autres craignent de se transformer en de simples « presse-boutons ». Smartphone dans une main, joystick dans l’autre… Les agriculteurs touchent-ils encore seulement la terre ? [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypes to genetically reduce greenhouse gas emissions in dairying
de Haas, Yvette; Pszczola, Marcin; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2017), 100(2), 855-870

Phenotypes have been reviewed to select for lower-emitting animals in order to decrease the environmental footprint of dairy cattle products. This includes direct selection for breath measurements, as ... [more ▼]

Phenotypes have been reviewed to select for lower-emitting animals in order to decrease the environmental footprint of dairy cattle products. This includes direct selection for breath measurements, as well as indirect selection via indicator traits such as feed intake, milk spectral data, and rumen microbial communities. Many of these traits are expensive or difficult to record, or both, but with genomic selection, inclusion of methane emission as a breeding goal trait is feasible, even with a limited number of registrations. At present, methane emission is not included among breeding goals for dairy cattle worldwide. There is no incentive to include enteric methane in breeding goals, although global warming and the release of greenhouse gases is a much-debated political topic. However, if selection for reduced methane emission became a reality, there would be limited consensus as to which phenotype to select for: methane in liters per day or grams per day, methane in liters per kilogram of energy-corrected milk or dry matter intake, or a residual methane phenotype, where methane production is corrected for milk production and the weight of the cow. We have reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of these traits, and discuss the methods for selection and consequences for these phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailCooking Has Variable Effects on the Fermentability in the Large Intestine of the Fraction of Meats, Grain Legumes, and Insects That Is Resistant to Digestion in the Small Intestine in an in Vitro Model of the Pig’s Gastrointestinal Tract
POELAERT, Christine ULg; Despret, Xavier; Sindic, Marianne ULg et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2017), 65

This study aimed to evaluate the fermentation in the large intestine of indigestible dietary protein sources from animal, insect, and plant origin using an in vitro model of the pig’s gastrointestinal ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to evaluate the fermentation in the large intestine of indigestible dietary protein sources from animal, insect, and plant origin using an in vitro model of the pig’s gastrointestinal tract. Protein sources were used raw and after a cooking treatment. Results showed that the category of the ingredient (meats, insects, or grain legumes) exerts a stronger impact on enzymatic digestibility, fermentation patterns, and bacterial metabolites such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) than the cooking treatment. The digestibility and the fermentation characteristics of insects were more affected by the cooking procedure than the other categories. Per gram of consumed food, ingredients from animal origin, namely, meats and insects, were associated with fewer fermentation end-products (gas, H2S, SCFA) than ingredients from plant origin, which is related to their higher small intestinal digestibility. [less ▲]

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See detailHow does forest cover impact water flows and ecosystem services? Insights from real-life catchments in Wallonia (Belgium)
Brogna, Delphine; Vincke, Caroline; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Ecological Indicators (2017), 72

While planet boundaries are being crossed and ecosystems degraded, the Ecosystem Service (ES) conceptrepresents a potential decision-making tool for improved natural resources management. The main aimof ... [more ▼]

While planet boundaries are being crossed and ecosystems degraded, the Ecosystem Service (ES) conceptrepresents a potential decision-making tool for improved natural resources management. The main aimof this paper is to assess the impact of forest cover on water related ES in Wallonia (Belgium) in termsof quantity and timing. We developed an approach based on easily accessible data, monitored in severalcountries and using straightforward statistical methods. This led us to study ES at “real-life” catchmentsscale: 22 catchments – from 30 to 250 km2– with mixed land covers were studied. We approached thewater supply and flood protection services through 5 indicators extracted from 10 hydrological years(2005–2014) discharge data series. These were computed annually and seasonally (vegetation periodfrom March to September and “non-vegetation” period the rest of the year). The water supply wasassessed through the specific volume Vs, the baseflow index BFI and the specific discharge exceeded95% of the time Q95s whereas the flood protection service was approached through the specific dis-charge exceeded 5% of the time Q05s and the flashiness index FI. Our study gives two main insights. First,statistical analyses show that forest cover negatively impact water supply when studying annual and“non-vegetation” period flows in general (Vs) but positively when studying low flows (Q95s). Regardingflood protection a slightly negative impact of forest cover on high flows (Q05s) was highlighted in the“non-vegetation” period. Results also show a negative impact of forests annually and in the vegetationperiod on the flashy behaviour of the catchment thus a positive impact on the flood protection ES. The“year” effect is overall highly significant testifying the importance of climatic factors. Rainfall is oftensignificant and can be considered as a main driver of these ES. Secondly, analyzing the quality of themodels produced and the results overall we assume that other variables characterizing the catchmentssuch as topography or soil types do play a significant role in the delivery of these ES. This questions theuse of land cover proxies in assessing and mapping of hydrological ES at a complex landscape scale. Wethus recommend further research to keep improving land cover proxies if they are used. [less ▲]

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See detailLettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. Sucrine) Growth Performance in Complemented Aquaponic Solution Outperforms Hydroponics
Delaide, Boris; Goddek, Simon; Gott, James et al

in Water (2016), 8(467),

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See detailNovel innovative possibilities for the dairy industry opened by common format of FT-MIR instruments
Grelet, Clément ULg; Fernandez Pierna, Juan Antonio; Dardenne, Pierre et al

Poster (2016, October)

FT-MIR technology is worldwide used for fast and cost effective determination of major milk components. However, due to the different individual response of each instrument the potential of this ... [more ▼]

FT-MIR technology is worldwide used for fast and cost effective determination of major milk components. However, due to the different individual response of each instrument the potential of this technology is currently underexploited as new tools cannot be easily ported to other instruments. Recently a standardization method was developed in order to harmonize the spectral response format between instruments of different brands and models but also across time for each spectrometer. The method matches monthly the infrared response of all spectrometers on the response of a reference instrument, making all machines talking a common language. The objective is to allow the creation and the use of common, new and innovative concepts by pooling resources and sharing data. Using this method, new tools for analysis of milk quality and milk technological properties have been created and shared within the network, as fatty acids and minerals predictions or milk coagulation properties. New concepts requiring a common spectral format have been developed like the untargeted detection of milk contaminant and abnormal milk or the determination of milk geographic origin. Models in relation with the status of the dairy cow were also created and shared as to predict ketosis, negative energy balance or methane emissions. Therefore models can be developed at one place and deployed within the entire network, in which 90 instruments are currently monthly standardized. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of high-wheat bran diet on sows’ microbiota, performances and progeny’s growth and health
Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

Conference (2016, September 02)

Finding alternatives to antimicrobial growth promoters is part of the goal of improving sustainability in pig production. Dietary fibres are considered as health-promoting substances acting on pigs’ ... [more ▼]

Finding alternatives to antimicrobial growth promoters is part of the goal of improving sustainability in pig production. Dietary fibres are considered as health-promoting substances acting on pigs’ microbiota. This study aimed to investigate whether the enrichment of sows’ diet with high levels of wheat bran (WB) could impact the performances of sows and piglets’ health. Seven sows were fed a control diet (CON) and 8 sows a WB diet from day 43 of gestation (WB 240 g/kg DM) until the end of the lactation period (WB 140 g/kg DM). Diets were formulated to be iso-energetic and iso-nitrogenous by changing the proportions of some ingredients. Faeces were sampled at different time points (before treatment, during treatment: in gestation and lactation) to determine microbiota composition (sequencing with Illumina MiSeq). Milk was sampled weekly to determine lactose, fat and protein concentration by mid-infrared technology and IgA and IgG contents by ELISA. Before weaning (d26-27), piglets were euthanized, intestinal contents and tissues sampled for further analyses. Zootechnical performances of sows and piglets were recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using the SAS MIXED procedure and repeated measurements. Treatment never impacted piglets’ weight (P=0.51). Sows’ ingestion during the lactation period was comparable between both treatments until the last 4 days of lactation where the percentage of target ingestion was significantly (P<0.001) lower for the WB (66%) compared to the CON group (89%). No effect on sows’ backfat and weight changes was observed. An increased abundance of Lactobacillus spp. in feces of the WB group was observed in gestation before and after diet change (8.8% vs 15.1% of total bacteria). However, for the overall genera changes between treatments, it only seems to occur for minor groups of bacteria. Milk protein, fat, IgG and IgA were not affected by treatment, but a time-effect (P<0.001) was observed while treatment impacted (P<0.05) lactose content. In conclusion, sows’ performances were not affected by the high WB diet and more research on the piglets’ samples is foreseen. [less ▲]

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See detailStrategies of the Walloon dairy breeders faced to the uncertain dairy future
Dalcq, Anne-Catherine ULg; Dogot, Thomas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg et al

Conference (2016, September 01)

This study observes the strategies, and their determinants, of the Walloon dairy breeders faced to the post quota perspective through the realization of 245 surveys, conducted from November 2014 to ... [more ▼]

This study observes the strategies, and their determinants, of the Walloon dairy breeders faced to the post quota perspective through the realization of 245 surveys, conducted from November 2014 to February 2015. Three kinds of strategical variables were defined and related to the evolution of milk production (MP) [the breeders who increase MP (HighMP) vs. keep constant MP (ConstantMP) vs. stop MP]; the valorisation of MP [alternative (ValMP) vs. classical] and the diversification of activities [with (DivMP) vs. without such activities]. The relationships between the chosen strategies and the quantitative technical variables were studied using generalized linear models. The independence between qualitative technical variables and the strategical variables was tested using Chi Square test. HighMP and ConstantMP bredeers represent 38.4% and 53.9% of respondents, respectively. HighMP breeders were significantly more declared as legal entity (p-value = 0.03), had more family members on the farm (p-value<0.01), larger agricultural area in property (p-value = 0.03) and higher MP quota (p-value = 0.01) compared to ConstantMP breeders. Only 9.8% of respondents decide to valorise differently MP. ValMP breeders tend to have more employees (p-value = 0.08) and an agricultural area less fragmented (p-value = 0.07) than classical breeders. A total of 7.8% of respondents decide to develop other activities. DivMP breeders tend to have more employees (p-value = 0.10), more agricultural area in property (p-value = 0.03) and a more recent year of installation (p-value < 0.01). Finally, 44.9% of ConstantMP breeders do not want to start an alternative valorisation of MP and diversify their activities. In conclusion, a relationship exists between, amongst others, the legal status, workforce available, characteristics of the agricultural area, the dairy production and the strategy chosen by the Walloon dairy breeders. [less ▲]

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See detailOptiMIR: Use of MIR spectra to predict multiple cow status as advisory tools for dairy farms
Grelet, Clément ULg; Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Bastin, Catherine et al

Conference (2016, August)

Considering the current increasing of herd size, there is a need for precise and rapid information on individual cow state. Mid infrared (MIR) technology is already used worldwide for milk analysis; it ... [more ▼]

Considering the current increasing of herd size, there is a need for precise and rapid information on individual cow state. Mid infrared (MIR) technology is already used worldwide for milk analysis; it allows rapid and cost effective determination of milk composition. The objective of OptiMIR project was to optimize the use of MIR spectra in order to produce indications on cow status thereby providing advisory tools to dairy farmers. Hence phenotypes of interest were collected in several countries and linked to MIR spectra. Since the OptiMIR network comprised 65 MIR instruments in 6 countries, standardisation of MIR data was necessary, allowing the collation of spectral databases and the use by all milk recording organizations (MRO) of the models developed. Using chemometric tools (like PLS regression), predictive models were developed to provide indicators on fine milk composition, on milk biomarkers of physiological imbalance, and directly on status of the cows. Equations predicting fine milk composition such as fatty acids and minerals were consolidated through the OptiMIR network, providing indirectly information on technological properties of milk and cow status. As biomarker of early physiological imbalance, an equation predicting citrate in milk was developed with good accuracy (R²cv=0.86); and as milk biomarkers of ketosis, BHB and acetone were calibrated with fair results (R²cv=0.63 and 0.67 respectively). Direct classification of spectra regarding low vs high risk of ketosis was also performed (84.5% sensitivity and 84.2% specificity). Direct regressions were realized for various negative energy balance criteria (r from 0.43 to 0.57) and enteric methane (R²cv=0.7). All equations are available to be used by MRO on field and converted into advisory tools for the dairy sector. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of wheat bran supplementation to sows on their milk quality, their performances and their progeny’s
Leblois, Julie ULg; Bindelle, Jérôme ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

Conference (2016, April 15)

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See detailCapitalizing in fine milk composition for breeding and management of dairy cows
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Dehareng, Fréderic et al

in Journal of Dairy Science (2016), 99

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of ... [more ▼]

The challenge of managing and breeding dairy cows is permanently adapting to changing production circumstances under socio-economic constraints. If managing and breeding address different timeframes of action, both need relevant phenotypes that allow for precise monitoring of the status of the cows, and their health, behavior, and well-being as well as their environmental impact and the quality of their products (i.e., milk and subsequently dairy products). Milk composition has been identified as an important source of information because it could reflect, at least partially, all these elements. Major conventional milk components such as fat, protein, urea, and lactose contents are routinely predicted by mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometry and have been widely used for these purposes. But, milk composition is much more complex and other nonconventional milk components, potentially predicted by MIR, might be informative. Such new milk-based phenotypes should be considered given that they are cheap, rapidly obtained, usable on a large scale, robust, and reliable. In a first approach, new phenotypes can be predicted from MIR spectra using techniques based on classical prediction equations. This method was used successfully for many novel traits (e.g., fatty acids, lactoferrin, minerals, milk technological properties, citrate) that can be then useful for management and breeding purposes. An innovation was to consider the longitudinal nature of the relationship between the trait of interest and the MIR spectra (e.g., to predict methane from MIR). By avoiding intermediate steps, prediction errors can be minimized when traits of interest (e.g., methane, energy balance, ketosis) are predicted directly from MIR spectra. In a second approach, research is ongoing to detect and exploit patterns in an innovative manner, by comparing observed with expected MIR spectra directly (e.g., pregnancy). All of these traits can then be used to define best practices, adjust feeding and health management, improve animal welfare, improve milk quality, and mitigate environmental impact. Under the condition that MIR data are available on a large scale, phenotypes for these traits will allow genetic and genomic evaluations. Introduction of novel traits into the breeding objectives will need additional research to clarify socio-economic weights and genetic correlations with other traits of interest. [less ▲]

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See detailHeritability of milk fat composition is considerably lower for Meuse-Rhine-Yssel compared to Holstein Friesian cattle
Maurice-Van Eijndhoven, Myrthe; Veerkamp, Roel; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg et al

in Livestock Science (2015), 180

The aim of this paper is to identify differences in genetic variation of fatty acid (FA) composition in milk in different breeds. Data used included Meuse-Rhine-Yssel (MRY) and Holstein Friesian (HF ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to identify differences in genetic variation of fatty acid (FA) composition in milk in different breeds. Data used included Meuse-Rhine-Yssel (MRY) and Holstein Friesian (HF) cattle breeds which were raised in the Netherlands. Both populations participated in the same milk recording system, but differed in selection history, where in the MRY there has been relatively very little emphasis on selection for high-input high-output production systems compared to HF. Differences in genetic variation were investigated by estimating breed specific additive genetic variances and heritabilities for FA contents in milk of MRY and HF. Mid Infrared Spectrometry spectra were used to predict total fat percentage and detailed FA contents in milk (14 individual FA and 14 groups of FA in g of fat/dL of milk). The dataset for MRY contained 2916 records from 2049 registered cows having at least 50% genes of MRY origin and the dataset used for HF contained 155,319 records from 96,315 registered cows having at least 50% genes of HF origin. Variance components of individual FA content in milk for the different breeds were estimated using a single trait animal model. Additive genetic variances for FA produced through de novo synthesis (short chain FA, C12:0, C14:0, and partly C16:0), C14:1 c-9 and C16:1 c-9 were significantly higher (. P<0.001) for HF compared to MRY. Heritabilities of the individual FA, C4:0 to C18:0, for HF ranged from 0.28 to 0.52 and for MRY from 0.17 to 0.34. Heritabilities of the individual C18 unsaturated FA for HF ranged from 0.11 to 0.34 and for MRY from 0.10 to 0.26. Although the mean content in milk for the FA C18:2 c-9, t-11 was low in both breeds, the additive genetic variance in our dataset was significantly higher for MRY (P<0.05) compared to HF. Heritabilities of the groups of FA for HF ranged from 0.19 to 0.53 and for MRY from 0.11 to 0.28. For the majority of the FA, the additive genetic variances for HF were significantly higher compared to MRY, except for most of the poly-unsaturated FA. The results for the poly-unsaturated FA, however, may be affected by the lower accuracy of the predictions for these FA. In conclusion, our results show that the HF breed has substantially larger genetic variance for most FA compared to MRY. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the use of novel milk phenotypes as predictors of difficult-to-record traits in breeding programs
Bastin, Catherine ULg; Colinet, Frédéric ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 66th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (2015, August)

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See detailOverview of possibilities and challenges of the use of infrared spectrometry in cattle breeding
Gengler, Nicolas ULg; Soyeurt, Hélène ULg; Dehareng, Frédéric et al

in Book of Abstracts of the 66th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (2015, August)

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See detailPredictions of Daily Milk and Fat Yields, Major Groups of Fatty Acids, and C18:1 cis-9 from Single Milking Data without a Milking Interval
Arnould, Valérie ULg; Reding, Romain; Bormann, Jeanne et al

in Animals (2015), 5(3), 643-661

Reducing the frequency of milk recording would help reduce the costs of official milk recording. However, this approach could also negatively affect the accuracy of predicting daily yields. This problem ... [more ▼]

Reducing the frequency of milk recording would help reduce the costs of official milk recording. However, this approach could also negatively affect the accuracy of predicting daily yields. This problem has been investigated in numerous studies. In addition, published equations take into account milking intervals (MI), and these are often not available and/or are unreliable in practice. The first objective of this study was to propose models in which the MI was replaced by a combination of data easily recorded by dairy farmers. The second objective was to further investigate the fatty acids (FA) present in milk. Equations to predict daily yield from AM or PM data were based on a calibration database containing 79,971 records related to 51 traits [milk yield (expected AM, expected PM, and expected daily); fat content (expected AM, expected PM, and expected daily); fat yield (expected AM, expected PM, and expected daily; g/day); levels of seven different FAs or FA groups (expected AM, expected PM, and expected daily; g/dL milk), and the corresponding FA yields for these seven FA types/groups (expected AM, expected PM, and expected daily; g/day)]. These equations were validated using two distinct external datasets. The results obtained from the proposed models were compared to previously published results for models which included a MI effect. The corresponding correlation values ranged from 96.4% to 97.6% when the daily yields were estimated from the AM milkings and ranged from 96.9% to 98.3% when the daily yields were estimated from the PM milkings. The simplicity of these proposed models should facilitate their use by breeding and milk recording organizations. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of calving interval on the economic results of dairy farms based on their typology.
Dalcq, Anne-Catherine ULg; Beckers, Yves ULg; Wyzen, Benoit et al

Conference (2015, July 15)

The calving interval (CI) can influence the milk production (MP) and the economic results of a farm. This research aimed to highlight the most economically important CI, on the basis of the accounts of ... [more ▼]

The calving interval (CI) can influence the milk production (MP) and the economic results of a farm. This research aimed to highlight the most economically important CI, on the basis of the accounts of breeders. The data set contained 1,318 accounts spread between 2007 and 2012. Technical information such as mean CI of the herd, percent of cows with a CI of less than 380 d (m380), between 380 and 419 d (e380419), between 420 and 459 d (e420459) and more than 459 d (p459), mean MP of the herd; as well as typological information such as quantity of equivalent concentrate (CC), number of ares of grass (GR) and of corn silage (CS) per livestock unit (LU); and economic information such as mean gross margin per cow were available. The relation between CI and the gross margin showed that if a single economic optimum of CI cannot be determined, this optimum could depend on the typology of the farm. Therefore, 4 groups were created by using a multiple correspondence analysis, including quantity of equivalent CC, number of ares of GR and of CS per LU as variables. The first group was the most intensive one with a feeding based mostly on CC and CS; the second group was similar but less intensive. The third group was the most extensive with high GR consumption. The fourth group was characterized by a near absence of CS but more CC. Moreover, m380, e380420, e420459, p459 were transformed from quantitative to qualitative variables by using numerical classification. A qualitative variable CI profile was created as a summary of all these variables. In each group, MP was modeled using the different CI variables. The assumption behind this modeling was that for a typological profile, the breeder must have the highest MP to maximize the gross margin. These models showed that MP is maximized when p459 is lower than 26%, lower than 37%, above 27% for the group 1, 2, 3 respectively. For the group 4, the model with the variable CI profile suggested that the economic optimum of CI is intermediate. These results underlined that the economic optimum of CI is related to the typology of the considered farm. Studying individual data is a perspective to determine more precisely CI with the best economic results. [less ▲]

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