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See detailEvidence for a Non-Gabaergic Action of Quaternary Salts of Bicuculline on Dopaminergic Neurones
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline ULg; Dresse, Albert ULg

in Neuropharmacology (1997), 36(11-12, Nov-Dec), 1653-7

Intracellular recordings were made from neurones, presumed to be dopaminergic, in the rat midbrain slice preparation. Bicuculline methiodide (BMI) and methochloride (BMC) reversibly blocked the slow ... [more ▼]

Intracellular recordings were made from neurones, presumed to be dopaminergic, in the rat midbrain slice preparation. Bicuculline methiodide (BMI) and methochloride (BMC) reversibly blocked the slow, apamin-sensitive component of the afterhyperpolarization in these cells. The IC50 for this effect was about 26 microM. In comparison, BMC antagonized the input resistance decrease evoked by muscimol (3 microM) with an IC50 of 7 microM. The base of bicuculline was less potent in blocking the slow afterhyperpolarization. SR95531 (2-[carboxy-3'-propyl]-3-amino-6-paramethoxy-phenyl-pyridaziniu m bromide), another competitive GABA(A) antagonist, and picrotoxin, a non-competitive GABA(A) antagonist, also blocked the action of muscimol (IC50s: 2 and 12 microM respectively), but had no effect on the afterhyperpolarization at a concentration of up to 100 microM. Moreover, 100 microM SR95531 did not affect the blockade of the afterhyperpolarization by BMC. This blockade persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin and was apparently not due to a reduction of calcium entry, suggesting that it involved a direct action on the channels which mediate this afterhyperpolarization. These results strongly suggest that quaternary salts of bicuculline act on more than one target in the central nervous system. Thus, the involvement of GABA(A) receptors in a given effect cannot be proven solely on the basis of its blockade by these agents. [less ▲]

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See detailBicuculline methiodide potentiates NMDA-dependent burst firing in rat dopamine neurons by blocking apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ currents.
Johnson, S. W.; Seutin, Vincent ULg

in Neuroscience Letters (1997), 231(1), 13-6

Apamin, a bee venom toxin which blocks a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced burst firing in dopamine neurons. We now report that burst firing is also potentiated by ... [more ▼]

Apamin, a bee venom toxin which blocks a Ca2+-dependent K+ current, potentiates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced burst firing in dopamine neurons. We now report that burst firing is also potentiated by an apamin-like effect of bicuculline methiodide (BMI) at the same concentration (30 microM) which blocks GABA(A) receptors in vitro. Using microelectrodes to record intracellularly from rat dopamine neurons in the midbrain slice, BMI reduced the apamin-sensitive afterhyperpolarization in all cells tested. BMI also mimicked apamin (100 nM) by potentiating burst firing produced by a concentration of NMDA (10 microM) which is too low to evoke burst firing when perfused alone. When recording under voltage-clamp, both BMI and apamin reduced a depolarization-activated outward current which was also sensitive to perfusate containing no-added Ca2+. Although picrotoxin (100 microM) and bicuculline free base (30 microM) blocked the inhibition of firing produced by the GABA(A) agonist isoguvacine (100 microM), neither had apamin-like effects. We conclude that BMI potentiates burst firing by blocking an apamin-sensitive Ca2+-activated K+ current. [less ▲]

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See detailSulfonylurea-sensitive potassium current evoked by sodium-loading in rat midbrain dopamine neurons.
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Shen, K. Z.; North, R. A. et al

in Neuroscience (1996), 71(3), 709-19

In Parkinson's disease, there is evidence of impaired mitochondrial function which reduces the capacity to synthesize ATP in dopamine neurons. This would be expected to reduce the activity of the sodium ... [more ▼]

In Parkinson's disease, there is evidence of impaired mitochondrial function which reduces the capacity to synthesize ATP in dopamine neurons. This would be expected to reduce the activity of the sodium pump (Na+/K+ ATPase), causing increased intracellular levels of Na+. Patch pipettes were used to introduce Na+ (40 mM in pipette solutions) into dopamine neurons in the rat midbrain slice in order to study the electrophysiological effects of increased intracellular Na+. We found that intracellular Na+ loading evoked 100-300 pA of outward current (at -60 mV) and increased whole-cell conductance; these effects developed gradually during the first 10 min after rupture of the membrane patch. Extracellular Ba2+ reduced most of the outward current evoked by Na+ loading; this Ba(2+)-sensitive current reversed direction at the expected reversal potential for K+ (EK), and was also blocked by extracellular tetraethylammonium (30 mM) and intracellular Cs+ (which replaced K+ in pipette solutions). The sulfonylurea drugs glipizide (IC50 = 4.9 nM), tolbutamide (IC50 = 23 microM) and glibenclamide (1 microM) were as effective as 300 microM Ba2+ in reducing the K+ current evoked by Na+ loading. When recording with "control" pipettes containing 15 mM Na+, diazoxide (300 microM) increased chord conductance and evoked outward current at -60 mV, which also reversed direction near EK. Effects of diazoxide were blocked by glibenclamide (1 microM) or glipizide (300 nM). Diazoxide (300 microM) and baclofen (3 microM), which also evoked K(+)-mediated outward currents recorded with control pipettes, caused little additional increases in outward currents during Na+ loading. Raising ATP concentrations to 10 mM in pipette solutions failed to significantly reduce currents evoked by diazoxide or Na+ loading, suggesting that these currents may not be mediated by ATP-sensitive K+ channels. Finally, Na+ loading using pipettes containing Cs+ in place of K+ evoked a relatively small outward current (50-150 pA at -60 mV), which developed gradually over the first 10 min after rupturing the membrane patch. This current was reduced by dihydro-ouabain (3 microM) and a low extracellular concentration of K+ (0.5 mM instead of 2.5 mM), but was not affected by Ba2+. We conclude that intracellular Na+ loading evokes a current generated by Na+/K+ ATPase in addition to sulfonylurea-sensitive K+ current. This Na(+)-dependent K+ current is unusual in its sensitivity to sulfonylureas, and could protect dopamine neurons against toxic effects of intracellular Na+ accumulation. [less ▲]

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See detailDéterminants de l'activité des neurones dopaminergiques mésencéphaliques chez le rat
Seutin, Vincent ULg

Thèse d’agrégation de l’enseignement supérieur (1995)

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See detailHydrogen Peroxide Hyperpolarizes Rat Ca1 Pyramidal Neurons by Inducing an Increase in Potassium Conductance
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline ULg; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in Brain Research (1995), 683(2), 275-8

It has been suggested that hydrogen peroxide is involved in cascades of pathological events affecting neural cells. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether this molecule is able by itself ... [more ▼]

It has been suggested that hydrogen peroxide is involved in cascades of pathological events affecting neural cells. The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether this molecule is able by itself to modify membrane properties of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. Intracellular recordings in the slice preparation showed that 3.3 mM hydrogen peroxide hyperpolarized all neurons tested (n = 41) by 11 +/- 3 mV. This effect persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin. It developed slowly, was reversible and reproducible. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, the extrapolated reversal potential of this effect was -95 +/- 5 mV in 2.5 mM external potassium. This value was not significantly different from the one obtained with the GABAB agonist baclofen (10 microM) (-98 +/- 5 mV). It shifted when the concentration of external potassium was increased to 10.5 mM (from -96 +/- 5 to -62 +/- 4 mV), in close agreement with the Nernst equation potassium ions. The hyperpolarization was significantly reduced (by 65 +/- 22%) by the potassium channel blocker barium (100 microM). We suggest that hydrogen peroxide is able to induce an increase in potassium conductance in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. The exact mechanism by which it produces this effect (direct action on channels or indirect effect) remains to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of dopamine and baclofen on N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced burst firing in rat ventral tegmental neurons.
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Johnson, S. W.; North, R. A.

in Neuroscience (1994), 58(1), 201-6

Intracellular microelectrode recordings were made from dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra zona compacta in rat brain slices in vitro. The firing pattern of the ... [more ▼]

Intracellular microelectrode recordings were made from dopamine-containing neurons of the ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra zona compacta in rat brain slices in vitro. The firing pattern of the neurons was switched from a tonic, single-spike pattern to a burst firing mode by adding N-methyl-D-aspartate (20 microM) to the superfusing solution; after adding tetrodotoxin the membrane potential underwent rhythmical oscillations of 20-40 mV at 0.5-2 Hz. Baclofen (1 microM) and dopamine (30 microM) hyperpolarized the neurons; when the potential was restored to its original level, the oscillations of potential and/or burst firing were not observed, but the tonic firing pattern was restored. These effects of baclofen and dopamine were prevented by barium (1 mM), which also prevented the membrane hyperpolarization. Oscillations of membrane current of a similar frequency were observed when the somatic membrane was voltage-clamped at -60 mV; these were also blocked by barium (1 mM). It is concluded that the oscillations in membrane potential observed with N-methyl-D-aspartate are generated predominantly at a dendritic location which is not voltage-clamped with an electrode at the soma. Baclofen and dopamine inhibit the oscillations by increasing the potassium conductance and hyperpolarizing the dendrites. [less ▲]

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See detailApamin increases NMDA-induced burst-firing of rat mesencephalic dopamine neurons.
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Johnson, S. W.; North, R. A.

in Brain Research (1993), 630(1-2), 341-4

Intracellular recordings made in vitro from rat midbrain dopamine neurons showed that apamin (100 nM) did not alter the regular spontaneous firing of the neurons, but it increased the occurrence of bursts ... [more ▼]

Intracellular recordings made in vitro from rat midbrain dopamine neurons showed that apamin (100 nM) did not alter the regular spontaneous firing of the neurons, but it increased the occurrence of bursts of action potentials in N-methyl-D-aspartate. Apamin appeared to facilitate burst-firing induced by NMDA because, by blocking an outward calcium-activated potassium current, it increased the depolarizing action of NMDA. [less ▲]

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See detailBurst-firing in dopamine neurons induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate : role of electrogenic sodium pump
Johnson, S.; Seutin, Vincent ULg; North, Alan

in Science (1992), 258

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See detailDifferential effects of picrotoxin and RO 15-1788 on high and low ethanol concentrations on rat locus coeruleus in vitro.
Verbanck, P. M.; Seutin, Vincent ULg; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in European Journal of Pharmacology (1992), 211(1), 15-21

In an in vitro electrophysiological single-cell recording model, ethanol had an inhibitory effect on locus coeruleus (LC) neurons at both low (0.1 mmol/l) and high (500 mmol/l) concentrations. In order to ... [more ▼]

In an in vitro electrophysiological single-cell recording model, ethanol had an inhibitory effect on locus coeruleus (LC) neurons at both low (0.1 mmol/l) and high (500 mmol/l) concentrations. In order to test if the benzodiazepine-GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor complex could be implicated in this effect, we tested the interaction of these ethanol concentrations with picrotoxin (100 mmol/l) and RO 15-1788 (10 nmol/l). RO 15-1788 reversed the inhibitory effect induced by ethanol 500 mmol/l, but not by ethanol 0.1 mmol/l; picrotoxin reversed the effects of both concentrations. This indicates that the mechanisms of action of ethanol on LC neurons are not the same for high and low concentrations. Furthermore, the effect of concentrations related to a behavioral effect (greater than 10 mmol/l) was reversed by a low-calcium medium that abolishes transmitter release. Therefore, the inhibition induced by ethanol 500 mmol/l seems to be due to the release of an endogenous benzodiazepine-like compound. [less ▲]

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See detailAcute Amphetamine-Induced Subsensitivity of A10 Dopamine Autoreceptors in Vitro
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Verbanck, Paul; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in Brain Research (1991), 558(1), 141-4

Extracellular recordings were obtained from spontaneously active, presumed dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat in a slice preparation. Bath-applied (+)-amphetamine (AMPH ... [more ▼]

Extracellular recordings were obtained from spontaneously active, presumed dopamine (DA) neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat in a slice preparation. Bath-applied (+)-amphetamine (AMPH) (1-30 microM) induced a concentration-dependent decrease in the firing rate of these neurons, which tended to saturate with the highest concentrations used (n = 11). This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2 receptors since it was reversed by the D2 antagonist sulpiride (n = 8). However, the most striking effect of AMPH was the induction of a prominent subsensitivity of DA autoreceptors: whereas in 18 out of 20 control neurons, the D2 agonist BHT 920 (100 nM) produced a rapid and complete inhibition of the firing, this was observed in none out of 11 neurons 10 min after the end of the application of AMPH (1-30 microM) (P less than 0.001). In these cells, the mean percent inhibition produced by BHT 920 was only 47 +/- 8%. This subsensitivity remained unchanged after 20 min and declined after one hour. This effect was specific, since the sensitivity of GABAB receptors to baclofen (500 nM-1 microM) was not modified by the application of AMPH (n = 12). These results suggest that AMPH-induced DA autoreceptor subsensitivity can be produced acutely and may be the first step in a cascade of events leading to behavioral sensitization to this compound. [less ▲]

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See detailYohimbine can induce ethanol tolerance in an in vitro preparation of rat locus coeruleus.
Verbanck, P.; Seutin, Vincent ULg; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (1991), 15(6), 1036-9

Noradrenergic neurons have been implicated in the development of ethanol dependence and tolerance. Moreover, the development of an hyposensitivity of alpha 2 adrenoceptors has been postulated during long ... [more ▼]

Noradrenergic neurons have been implicated in the development of ethanol dependence and tolerance. Moreover, the development of an hyposensitivity of alpha 2 adrenoceptors has been postulated during long-term exposition to ethanol. In order to test the putative role of alpha 2 receptors in ethanol intoxication, we have studied the interaction between ethanol and yohimbine, an alpha 2 antagonist, on the spontaneous firing rate of rat locus coeruleus (LC) in an in vitro slice model. The spikes from single neurons were recorded by glass microelectrodes. Ethanol at 100 mM, a concentration that parallels the behavioral effects in the human and in the animals, inhibits the firing activity of some LC cells. This inhibition was quickly reversed after stopping the ethanol perfusion and was observed for each further administration. However, if yohimbine (20 microM) was simultaneously perfused, the ethanol-induced inhibition was rapidly antagonized. This effect is reversible after long time washout of yohimbine. This suggests that alpha 2 adrenoceptors could be implicated in the inhibitory effect of ethanol on LC noradrenergic neurons and perhaps in the development of tolerance. However, other hypotheses are discussed, because yohimbine can also antagonize other types of receptors. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the ventral tegmental area of the rat : an electrophysiological in vitro study
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Verbanck, Paul; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in Brain Research (1990), 514(1), 147-150

Extracellular recordings were obtained from spontaneously active, presumed dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat in a slice preparation. Bath-applied N-methyl-D-aspartate ... [more ▼]

Extracellular recordings were obtained from spontaneously active, presumed dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the rat in a slice preparation. Bath-applied N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (1-20 microM) activated all neurons tested (n = 36). This effect was clearly concentration-dependent (n = 14), quickly reversible and reproducible. No bursting type of discharge was observed during NMDA infusion. The NMDA receptor blocker DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (50 microM) reversibly antagonized the increase in cell firing produced with 10 microM NMDA by 83.5 +/- 3% (mean +/- S.E.M.) (n = 8, P less than 0.05). Lowering the Mg2+ concentration of the perfusion fluid to one-third of its normal value significantly enhanced the excitatory effect of 5 microM NMDA (n = 7, P less than 0.05), but not of 500 nM carbachol (n = 6). Finally, NMDA did not modify the sensitivity of dopaminergic autoreceptors of VTA neurons (n = 8), when compared to controls (n = 10). These observations strongly support the presence of specific NMDA receptors in the VTA. [less ▲]

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See detailElectrophysiological effects of ethanol on monoaminergic neurons: an in vivo and in vitro study.
Verbanck, P.; Seutin, Vincent ULg; Dresse, Albert ULg et al

in Alcoholism, Clinical & Experimental Research (1990), 14(5), 728-35

Monoaminergic neurons have been shown to play a role in both the intoxicating and chronic effects of ethanol. We present here the results of a study about the acute effects of ethanol on serotonergic ... [more ▼]

Monoaminergic neurons have been shown to play a role in both the intoxicating and chronic effects of ethanol. We present here the results of a study about the acute effects of ethanol on serotonergic raphe nucleus, noradrenergic locus coeruleus, and dopaminergic ventral tegmental area. These nuclei were investigated electrophysiologically by recording the spontaneous firing rate of single neurons using glass microelectrodes, both in vivo in chloral hydrate anesthetized rats and in vitro in brain slices. Ethanol was perfused intravenously at a rate ranging from 0.2 mg/kg/min to 0.2 g/kg/min in vivo, and at concentrations between 10(-8) M and 1 M in vitro. We observed that each monoaminergic nucleus had its own pattern of responses to acute ethanol perfusion, and that high and low concentrations have different actions, suggesting a biphasic effect. For example, in slices, ethanol concentrations higher than 10 mM induce an excitation in most raphe and ventral tegmental area neurons, and an inhibition of firing in locus coeruleus neurons. The results were comparable in the in vivo model, but much more heterogenous. We conclude that the effect of ethanol on the monoaminergic neurons is specific of the type of neuron, and that a biphasic effect is commonly found. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of BHT-920 on monoaminergic neurons of the rat brain : an electrophysiological in vivo and in vitro study
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline ULg; Giesbers, Irène ULg et al

in Mededelingen van de Faculteit Landbouwwetenschappen (Rijksuniversiteit te Gent) (1990), 342

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See detailComparison of the Effect of Morphine on Locus Coeruleus Noradrenergic and Ventral Tegmental Area Dopaminergic Neurons in Vitro
Seutin, Vincent ULg; Franchimont, Nathalie; Massotte, Laurent ULg et al

in Life Sciences (1990), 46(25), 1879-85

Extracellular single-cell recordings were performed on rat brain slices to compare the effects of morphine on noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) and on dopaminergic neurons of the ventral ... [more ▼]

Extracellular single-cell recordings were performed on rat brain slices to compare the effects of morphine on noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) and on dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Morphine inhibited the firing of LC neurons at very low concentrations. The mean IC50 was 13.4 +/- 1nM (mean +/- SEM) (n = 7). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of morphine was identical in slices obtained from rats anesthetized with chloral hydrate or from non-anesthetized rats. On the contrary, morphine did not have any influence on the firing of most VTA neurons (N = 20) up to 100 microM, and did not modify the sensitivity of their autoreceptors (N = 8). It is concluded that morphine potently inhibits the firing of LC neurons in vitro both in slices of anesthetized and not anesthetized animals and has no direct excitatory effect on VTA dopaminergic neurons of the rat. [less ▲]

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