References of "Senterre, Thibault"
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See detailGrowth velocity of preterm infants - analysis and recommendations
Fenton, Tanis; Hoyaos, Angela; Groh-Wargo, Sharon et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailGrowth velocity of preterm infants - analysis and recommendations
Fenton, Tanis; Hoyos, Angela; Groh-Wargo, Sharon et al

Conference (2017)

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See detailL’enfant qui perd du poids
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in Barlow, P; Ceysens, G; Emonts, P (Eds.) et al Le Guide du Postpartum (2016)

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See detailLevels of silicon in maternal, cord and newborn serum and their relationship with those of zinc and copper
Díaz-Gómez; Bissé, Emmanuel; SENTERRE, Thibault ULg et al

in Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (2016)

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See detailThe Low-Birth-Weight Infants: Inpatient Care
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Lapillone, Alexandre

in Duggan, C; Watkins, JB; Koletzko, B (Eds.) et al Nutrition in Pediatrics: Basic Science and Clinical Application - 5th Edition (2016)

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See detailA wide range of calculations methods are used to describe weight gain growth velocitiy of preterm infants
Fenton, Tanis; SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Madhu, Aiswara et al

in European Journal of Pediatrics (2016), 175(11), 1639-1640

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See detailIs early “aggressive” feeding dangerous for extremely low birth weight infants?
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Delbos, Marion; Blecic, Anne-Sophie

in European Journal of Pediatrics (2016), 175(11), 1731

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See detailLa nutrition néonatale – Pourquoi et comment l’optimiser tout en réduisant le risque d’entérocolite nécrosante
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Jacob, Mathilde

in journée annuelle de conférences de l'association des Infirmiers Spécialisés en Pédiatrie et Néonatologie (2016)

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See detailRôle des graisses dans la nutrition et le métabolisme néonatal
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

Scientific conference (2016)

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See detailLes graisses dans la nutrition néonatale
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

in Belgian Journal of Paediatrics (2016), 18(3), 244-247

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See detailHydrolyzed protein in preterm
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Rigo, Jacques

in Bhatia, Jatinder; Shamir, Raanan; Vandenplas, Yvan (Eds.) Protein in neonatal and infant nutrition: recent updates (2016)

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See detailPost-discharge formula for premature infants, is it needed?
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg

Conference (2016)

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See detailParenteral nutrition in premature infants
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Terrin, Gianluca; De Curtis, Mario et al

in Guandalini, Stephano; Dhawan, Anil; Branski, David (Eds.) Textbook of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition: A Comprehensive Guide to Practice (2016)

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See detailEnteral nutrition in preterm neonates
Terrin, Gianluca; SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Rigo, Jacques et al

in Guandalini, Stefano; Dhawan, Anil; Branski, David (Eds.) Textbook of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition: A Comprehensive Guide to Practice (2016)

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See detailSubjective assessment of perinatal adaptation and respiratory management in <29 weeks infants
RIGO, Vincent ULg; BROUX, Isabelle ULg; de HALLEUX, Virginie ULg et al

Poster (2015, March 12)

Background A primary CPAP strategy is beneficial even in extremely preterm infants. Many still require intubation for stabilization. Half of those managed with primary CPAP will also require further ... [more ▼]

Background A primary CPAP strategy is beneficial even in extremely preterm infants. Many still require intubation for stabilization. Half of those managed with primary CPAP will also require further support: surfactant administration or mechanical ventilation, and have increased risks of death or neonatal morbidities, and will require longer respiratory support. Identifying them early, during the birth stabilization process, might lead to improvements in respiratory care. A subjective classification of perinatal adaptation as Good, Bad or Marginal has been suggested but not evaluated. Methods Single center retrospective study of <29 weeks premature infants admitted between 01/2013 and 07/2014. Neonatal database and discharge summaries provide neonatal care and outcome data. Good perinatal adaptation (GPA) is considered for infants with good respiratory drive, tone and low oxygen requirement in the delivery room. Infants with marginal (M) PA had intermittent respiratory drive, normocardia with ventilation, and decreasing FiO2. Bad (B) PA is considered with hypotonia, bradycardia, apnea and high FiO2. Results Among 58 infants (50 inborn), 16 had GPA, 19 MPA and 23 BPA. Risk factors for bad adaptation are (not significantly different-NS) male gender, lower GA , and absent/incomplete antenatal steroid exposure. Apgar score at 1 minute increases according to perinatal adaptation quality (B3,5; M5,5 and G7,4; p<0,01), with improvements at 5 minutes: 6,6; 7,0 (NS) and 8,3 (p(B)<0,01). Risk of intubation in the delivery room is associated with poorer adaptation: B83%, M58% and G12% (p<0,01). Primary CPAP success was not different according to groups (B 3/3; M66%; G56%). However, more infants with MPA received surfactant while on CPAP (LISA method): B 2/3; M:5/6 and G:4/7. This surfactant was given in the delivery room in 1, 4 and 2 infants respectively. For children intubated within day 3, the duration of the first invasive ventilation duration was 29 hours (B), 15h (M) and 9h (G), NS. Risk of early neonatal death decreases with improving perinatal adaptation: 26%, 16% (NS) and 0% (pB <0,05). Risk of BPD at 36 weeks is not different among groups (B 19%, M13%, G 12%), but combined risk of death or BPD at 36 weeks tends to decreases (B 43%, M 31%, G 12%, p=0,12). Conclusions Better perinatal adaptation improves chances of being initially managed with CPAP. CPAP success may be improved with less invasive surfactant therapy, especially in preterm infants with marginal adaptation. Perinatal adaptation assessment identifies mortality risk. [less ▲]

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See detailIs early aggressive feeding dangerous for extremely low birth weight infants?
Blecic, Anne-Sophie; Delbos, Marion; RIGO, Vincent ULg et al

in Tijdschrift van de Belgische Kinderarts = Journal du Pédiatre Belge (2015), 17(1), 83

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See detailElectrolyte and mineral homeostasis after optimizing early macronutrient intakes in VLBW infants on parenteral nutrition
SENTERRE, Thibault ULg; Abu Zahirah, Ibrahim; PIELTAIN, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (2015), 6(14), 491-498

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (24 ULg)