References of "Schynts, F."
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See detailAn Immunologic investigation of canine eosinophilic bronchopneumopathy.
Clercx, Cécile ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg; German, Alex et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2002), 16

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See detailEstablishment of Latency Associated with Glycoprotein E (Ge) Seroconversion after Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Infection in Calves with High Levels of Passive Antibodies Lacking Ge Antibodies
Schynts, F.; Lemaire, Mylène; Ros, C. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2001), 82(3), 211-22

This study was conducted to investigate the glycoprotein E (gE) antibody response raised after inoculation with a low infectious dose of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) in six calves possessing high levels ... [more ▼]

This study was conducted to investigate the glycoprotein E (gE) antibody response raised after inoculation with a low infectious dose of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) in six calves possessing high levels of passive immunity from cows repeatedly vaccinated with gE deleted marker vaccine. Four out of the six calves developed gE antibodies 3-5 weeks after infection, whereas the two other ones remained seronegative to gE. After 5 months of infection, the six calves were treated with dexamethasone. Virus was only re-excreted by the four calves which previously seroconverted against gE. The two other calves became seronegative against BHV-1, 30-32 weeks after infection. A second dexamethasone treatment performed 11 months after infection failed to demonstrate a latent infection in these two calves. Moreover, the lack of identification of a cell-mediated immune response, after the two dexamethasone treatments, and the failure to detect BHV-1 DNA sequences in trigeminal ganglia strongly suggest that these two calves were not latently infected. In conclusion, the presence of high levels of maternal immunity lacking gE antibodies does not prevent latency after infection with a low titre of BHV-1. Moreover, latency is associated with a serological response to gE. These results confirm that the gE deletion is a good marker to identify young calves latently infected with a field virus. [less ▲]

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See detailUse of PCR and Immunofluorescence to Detect Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Recombinants
Schynts, F.; Vanderplasschen, Alain ULg; Hanon, E. et al

in Journal of Virological Methods (2001), 92(1), 99-104

Homologous recombination occurs frequently between strains of the same alphaherpesvirus species. Studies of this phenomenon require techniques that can differentiate parental strains from putative ... [more ▼]

Homologous recombination occurs frequently between strains of the same alphaherpesvirus species. Studies of this phenomenon require techniques that can differentiate parental strains from putative recombinant progeny viruses. Usually, progeny viruses generated by co-infection of two distinguishable parental strains are first cloned by selection of a single plaque and then characterised by PCR. An assay designed to investigate recombination between two bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) strains lacking either the glycoprotein gC or gE ORF is described. A PCR assay was developed in which a single step co-amplifies both BHV-1 glycoprotein-encoding sequences. Because the usual procedure for virus isolation, viral plaque picking, can lead to polyclonal virus preparations, a PCR protocol alone does not differentiate between samples containing recombinant viruses (gC+/gE+) and those containing a mixture of both single deleted parental strains (gC-/gE+ and gC+/gE-), and false positives resulting from recombination could occur. To reduce this possibility, double-label immunofluorescence staining of isolated plaques was developed, which coupled with PCR, allows straightforward discrimination between parental strains and progeny recombinant viruses. This assay will be useful for further studies of recombination, especially those evaluating the potential emergence of recombinants between BHV-1 marker vaccine and wildtype strains. [less ▲]

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See detailNatural case of bovine herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis in an adult cow.
Roels, S.; Charlier, G.; Letellier, C. et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2000), 146(20), 586-8

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See detailA Specific Pcr to Differentiate between Ge Negative Vaccine and Wildtype Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 Strains
Schynts, F.; Baranowski, E.; Lemaire, Mylène et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (1999), 66(3), 187-95

In the context of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) control programmes using glycoprotein E (gE) deleted marker vaccines, a PCR assay was developed to allow the genotypic differentiation between ... [more ▼]

In the context of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) control programmes using glycoprotein E (gE) deleted marker vaccines, a PCR assay was developed to allow the genotypic differentiation between wildtype bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) and gE negative strains. This assay is based on the PCR amplification of a 281 bp DNA fragment within the gE gene. The specificity of the amplification was confirmed by restriction endonuclease analysis and nucleotide sequencing of the PCR product. Its ability to determine the gE genotype of BoHV-1 strains was demonstrated on isolates coming from 20 experimental calves infected with four different BoHV-1 strains. This PCR assay may be a useful tool for monitoring the spread of live marker vaccine and the gE genotype of viral field isolates. [less ▲]

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