References of "Schoenen, Jean"
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See detailHeadache
FUMAL, Arnaud ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Kopf, A; Nilesh (Eds.) Guide to pain management in low-ressources settings (2011)

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See detailTreatment of migraine: update on new therapies.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2011)

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a comprehensive selection of the latest clinical trial results in antimigraine treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: The oral calcitonine gene-related peptide antagonist ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides a comprehensive selection of the latest clinical trial results in antimigraine treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: The oral calcitonine gene-related peptide antagonist telcagepant is efficacious in acute treatment. Compared to triptans, its efficacy is almost comparable but its tolerance is superior. The same is true for the 5HT-1F agonist lasmiditan, another agent devoid of vascular effects. Triptans, as other drugs, are more efficient if taken early but nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics remain useful for acute treatment, according to several meta-analyses. Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation during the aura rendered more patients pain-free (39%) than sham stimulation (22%) in one study. Topiramate could be effective for migrainous vertigo, but it did not prevent transformation to chronic migraine in patients with high attack frequency. Onabotulinumtoxin A was effective for chronic migraine and well tolerated, but the therapeutic gain over placebo was modest; the clinical profile of responders remains to be determined before widespread use. Occipital nerve stimulation was effective in intractable chronic migraine with 39% of responders compared to 6% after sham stimulation. This and other neuromodulation techniques, such as sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation, are promising treatments for medically refractory patients but large controlled trials are necessary. One study suggests that outcome of patent foramen ovale closure in migraine might depend on anatomic and functional characteristics. SUMMARY: Drugs with a better efficacy or side-effect profile than triptans may soon become available for acute treatment. The future may also look brighter for some of the very disabled chronic migraineurs thanks to novel drug and neuromodulation therapies. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug-induced changes in cortical inhibition in medication overuse headache.
Curra, Antonio; Coppola, Gianluca; Gorini, Manuela et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2011), 31(12), 1282-90

BACKGROUND: We investigated whether chronic headache related to medication overuse (MOH) is associated with changes in brain mechanisms regulating inhibitory cortical responses compared with healthy ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We investigated whether chronic headache related to medication overuse (MOH) is associated with changes in brain mechanisms regulating inhibitory cortical responses compared with healthy volunteers and episodic migraineurs recorded between attacks, and whether these changes differ according to the drug overused. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We studied 40 MOH patients whose symptoms were related to triptans alone, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or both medications combined, 12 migraineurs and 13 healthy volunteers. We used high-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor cortex to assess the silent period from contracted perioral muscles. RESULTS: In MOH patients the cortical silent period differed according to the type of headache medication overused: in patients overusing triptans alone it was shorter than in healthy volunteers (44.7 +/- 14.2 vs. 108.1 +/- 30.1 ms), but similar to that reported in migraineurs (59.9 +/- 30.4 ms), whereas in patients overusing NSAIDs alone or triptans and NSAIDs combined duration of silent period was within normal limits (80.6 +/- 46.4 and 103.8 +/- 47.2 ms). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with episodic migraineurs, MOH patients overusing triptans have no significant change in cortical inhibition, whereas those overusing NSAIDs have an increase in cortical inhibitory mechanisms. We attribute these changes to medication-induced neural adaptation promoted by changes in central serotonin neurotransmission. [less ▲]

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See detailLa neurostimulation : quelle place dans les céphalées réfractaires?
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; SCHOENEN, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2011), 66(2), 85-90

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See detailPeripheral nerve stimulation in chronic cluster headache.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Progress in Neurological Surgery (2011), 24

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments ... [more ▼]

Cluster headache is well known as one of the most painful primary neurovascular headache. Since 1% of chronic cluster headache patients become refractory to all existing pharmacological treatments, various invasive and sometimes mutilating procedures have been tempted in the last decades. Recently, neurostimulation methods have raised new hope for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. The main focus of this chapter is on stimulation of the great occipital nerve, which has been the best evaluated peripheral nerve stimulation technique in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache, providing the most convincing results so far. Other peripheral nerve stimulation approaches used for this indication are also reviewed in detail. Although available studies are limited to a relatively small number of patients and placebo-controlled trials are lacking, existent clinical data suggest that occipital nerve stimulation should nonetheless be recommended for intractable chronic cluster headache patients before more invasive deep brain stimulation surgery. More studies are needed to evaluate the usefulness of supraorbital nerve stimulation and of vagus nerve stimulation in management of cluster headaches. [less ▲]

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See detailIs chronic migraine a never-ending migraine attack?
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pain (2011), 152(2), 239-40

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See detailIntensity dependence of auditory evoked potentials during light interference in migraine.
Ambrosini, Anna; Coppola, Gianluca; Gerardy, Pierre-Yves et al

in Neuroscience letters (2011), 492(2), 80-3

Migraine patients show interictally a strong intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials (IDAP) and a lack of habituation of evoked potentials. Photic drive on high-frequency flash ... [more ▼]

Migraine patients show interictally a strong intensity dependence of auditory evoked cortical potentials (IDAP) and a lack of habituation of evoked potentials. Photic drive on high-frequency flash stimulation is another well-known interictal feature in migraineurs, associated with alpha-rhythm hyper-synchronisation. We compared therefore the influence of light stimulation on IDAP in healthy volunteers (HV) and migraine patients. A continuous flash stimulation was delivered during the recording of auditory evoked potentials at suprathreshold increasing stimulation intensities. IDAP was measured as the amplitude/stimulus intensity function (ASF) slope. In HV, the ASF slope decreased during flash stimulation, whereas, on average, there was no significant change in migraineurs. A closer analysis of migraineurs disclosed two subgroups of patients with no detectable clinical differences: one, the largest, in which the ASF slope was normal at baseline, but increased during light stimulation, the other with an increased ASF slope at rest and a decrease during light interference. Visual sensory overload is able to increase IDAP in the majority of migraineurs, which contrasts with HV. We hypothesise that this could be due to hyper-synchronisation of the alpha rhythm because of photic drive and possibly thalamo-cortical dysfunction. A minority of migraineurs have, like HV, an IDAP reduction during light interference. They are, however, characterised, unlike most HV, by a high IDAP at baseline. Besides underscoring the pathophysiological heterogeneity of migraine, these results suggest that light interference might improve the phenotyping of migraine patients who have a normal IDAP in the resting condition. [less ▲]

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See detailMigraine preventive drugs differentially affect cortical spreading depression in rat.
Bogdanov, Vladimir ULg; Multon, Sylvie ULg; Chauvel, Virginie ULg et al

in Neurobiology of Disease (2011), 41(2), 430-5

Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. Drugs with distinct pharmacological properties are effective in the preventive treatment of migraine. To test the ... [more ▼]

Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is the most likely cause of the migraine aura. Drugs with distinct pharmacological properties are effective in the preventive treatment of migraine. To test the hypothesis that their common denominator might be suppression of CSD we studied in rats the effect of three drugs used in migraine prevention: lamotrigine which is selectively effective on the aura but not on the headache, valproate and riboflavin which have a non-selective effect. Rats received for 4 weeks daily intraperitoneal injections of one of the three drugs. For valproate and riboflavin we used saline as control, for lamotrigine its vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide. After treatment, cortical spreading depressions were elicited for 2h by occipital KCl application. We measured CSD frequency, its propagation between a posterior (parieto-occipital) and an anterior (frontal) electrode, and number of Fos-immunoreactive nuclei in frontal cortex. Lamotrigine suppressed CSDs by 37% and 60% at posterior and anterior electrodes. Valproate had no effect on posterior CSDs, but reduced anterior ones by 32% and slowed propagation velocity. Riboflavin had no significant effect at neither recording site. Frontal Fos expression was decreased after lamotrigine and valproate, but not after riboflavin. Serum levels of administered drugs were within the range of those usually effective in patients. Our study shows that preventive anti-migraine drugs have differential effects on CSD. Lamotrigine has a marked suppressive effect which correlates with its rather selective action on the migraine aura. Valproate and riboflavin have no effect on the triggering of CSD, although they are effective in migraine without aura. Taken together, these results are compatible with a causal role of CSD in migraine with aura, but not in migraine without aura. [less ▲]

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See detailLe laboratoire d’Anatomie : un banc d’essai des nouvelles technologies
Bonnet, Pierre ULg; Carlier, Alain ULg; Radermecker, Marc ULg et al

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2010), 65(Synthèse 2010), 35-40

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See detailEffect of kynurenic acid on sensitivity to cortical spreading depression in rats
Chauvel, Virginie ULg; Vamos, Eniko; Pardutz, Arpat et al

Poster (2010, October)

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See detailKynurenic acid decreases sensitivity to cortical spreading depression in rat
Chauvel, Virginie ULg; Vamos, Eniko; Pardutz, Arpat et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailInvolvement of Placental growth factor in Wallerian degeneration
Chaballe, Linda ULg; Close, Pierre ULg; Sempels, Maxime ULg et al

Poster (2010, September)

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See detailSTEM CELLS IN THE ADULT RAT SPINAL CORD: PLASTICITY AFTER INJURY AND TREADMILL TRAINING EXERCISE.
Foret, Ariane ULg; Quertainmont, Renaud ULg; Botman, O. et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 112(3), 762-772

ABSTRACT Ependymal cells located around the central canal of the adult spinal cord are considered as a source of neural stem cells (NSCs) and represent an interesting pool of endogenous stem cells for ... [more ▼]

ABSTRACT Ependymal cells located around the central canal of the adult spinal cord are considered as a source of neural stem cells (NSCs) and represent an interesting pool of endogenous stem cells for repair strategies. Physical exercise is known to increase ependymal cell proliferation, while improving functional recovery. In this work, we further characterized those endogenous NSCs within the normal and injured adult rat spinal cord and investigated the effects of treadmill training using immunohistochemical and behavioural studies. In uninjured untrained rats, Sox-2, a NSC marker, was detected in all ependymal cells of the central canal, and also scattered throughout the parenchyma of the spinal cord. Within the lesion, Sox-2 expression increased transiently, while the number of nestin-positive ependymal cells increased with a concomitant enhancement of proliferation, as indicated by the mitotic markers Ki67 and BrdU. Exercise, which improved functional recovery and autonomous micturition, maintained nestin expression in both injured and uninjured spinal cords, with a positive correlation between locomotor recovery and the number of nestin-positive cells. [less ▲]

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See detailNSAIDs in the acute treatment of migraine: A review of clinical and experimental data
Párdutz, Arpad; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Pharmaceuticals (2010), 3

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See detailHoneycomb-like appearance of dilated Virchow-Robin spaces.
Ruiz Miyares, F. J.; Deleu, D.; Akhtar, N. et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2010), 110(1), 116-7

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