References of "Schoenen, Jean"
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See detailHeadache: spreading from molecules to patients
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Coppola, G.

in Lancet Neurology (2010), 9

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See detailSustained efficacy of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache after up to 5 years treatment
Magis, Delphine ULg; Gérardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2010), 11(Suppl 1), 15

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study ... [more ▼]

Background. Drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH) is a devastating condition for which various invasive procedures have been tempted without any satisfactory effect. Our prospective pilot study of great occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) in 8 drCCH patients showed encouraging results at 15 months (1). Methods. We recruited 15 patients with drCCH according to the previously published criteria of intractability (2). They were implanted with suboccipital stimulators on the side of their headache. Long-term follow-up was achieved by questionnaires administered during a headache consultation and/or by telephone interviews. Results. One patient had an immediate post operative infection of the material. Mean time with ONS was 28.8 months (range 3-60 months). Nine of the 14 remaining patients were totally pain-free (64%), 2 patients had an improvement in frequency exceeding 90% and one patient a 89% amelioration. Two patients did not respond or described mild improvement. Intensity of residual attacks was not improved by ONS. Four patients (29%) were able to reduce their prophylaxis. Common technical problems were battery depletion (N=8/14, 57%) and material infection (N=3/15, 20%). Recurrent battery replacement (until 2/ year in one patient) is now avoided by the availability of rechargeable batteries. Clinical peculiarities associated with ONS were occurrence of infrequent contralateral attacks (N=5/14, 36%), and/or isolated ispilateral autonomic attacks (N=5/14, 36%). Rapid attack recurrence after stimulator switch off was reported by 7/12 improved patients (58%). Two patients found ONS-related paresthesias unbearable; one had his stimulator removed, the other switched it off though he was objectively ameliorated. Subjectively, nine patients are very satisfied by ONS and one patient moderately satisfied. Conclusions. Our long-term follow-up confirms the efficacy of ONS in drCCH, which remains a safe and well-tolerated technique. The occurrence of contralateral attacks and isolated autonomic attacks in nearly 50% of ONS responders may have therapeutic and pathophysiological implications. [less ▲]

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See detailCentral neuromodulation in cluster headache patients treated with occipital nerve stimulators: A PET study
Magis, Delphine ULg; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie ULg; Fumal, Arnaud ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2010), 110(Suppl 1), 17

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Use functional brain imaging to explore activity changes in centres involved in trigeminal pain processing and control before and after occipital neurostimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache patients. BACKGROUND: Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) provides relief to about 60% of patients suffering from drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH). Its mode of action, however, remains elusive, but the long latency to meaningful effect suggests that ONS induces slow neuromodulation. METHODS: Ten drCCH patients underwent an 18FDG-PET scan after ONS durations varying between 0 and 30 months. All were scanned with ongoing ONS (ON) and with the stimulator switched OFF. RESULTS: After 6-30 months of ONS, 3 patients were pain free and 4 had a ≥ 90% reduction of attack frequency (responders). In patients overall compared to controls, several areas of the pain matrix were hypermetabolic: ipsilateral hypothalamus, midbrain and ipsilateral lower pons. All normalized after ONS, except the hypothalamus. Switching ON or OFF the stimulator had little influence on brain glucose metabolism. The perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC) was hyperactive in ONS responders compared to non-responders. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Metabolic normalization in the pain neuromatrix and lack of short-term changes induced by the stimulation support the hypothesis that ONS acts in drCCH through slow neuromodulatory processes. Selective activation in responders of PACC, a pivotal structure in the endogenous opioid system, suggests that ONS may restore balance within dysfunctioning pain control centres. That ONS is nothing but a symptomatic treatment might be illustrated by the persistent hypothalamic hypermetabolism which could explain why autonomic attacks may persist despite pain relief and why cluster attacks recur shortly after stimulator arrest. [less ▲]

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See detailNeurostimulation therapy in intractable headaches.
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Allena, Marta; Magis, Delphine ULg

in Handbook of clinical neurology / edited by P.J. Vinken and G.W. Bruyn (2010), 97

A proportion of chronic headache patients become refractory to medical treatment and severely disabled. In such patients various neurostimulation methods have been proposed, ranging from invasive ... [more ▼]

A proportion of chronic headache patients become refractory to medical treatment and severely disabled. In such patients various neurostimulation methods have been proposed, ranging from invasive procedures such as deep-brain stimulation to minimally invasive ones like occipital nerve stimulation. They have been applied in single cases or small series of patients affected with varying headache disorders: cervicogenic headache, hemicrania continua, posttraumatic headache, chronic migraine, and cluster headache. Although favorable results were reported overall, it is premature to consider neurostimulation as a treatment with established utility in refractory headaches. At present, the most detailed clinical studies have been performed in intractable chronic cluster headache (iCCH) patients, who represent about 1% of all chronic cluster headache (CCH) patients. Various lesional interventions have been attempted in these patients, none with lasting benefits. In recent years, non-destructive neurostimulation methods have raised new hope. Hypothalamic deep-brain stimulation (hDBS) acts rapidly and has lasting efficacy, but is not without risk. Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) was studied in two trials on a total of 17 iCCH patients. Clinical efficacy was found to be very satisfactory by most patients and by the investigators. Although slightly less efficacious than hDBS, ONS has the advantage of being rather harmless and reversible. At this stage, it should be preferred as first-line invasive therapy for iCCH. Recent case reports mention the efficacy of supraorbital (SNS) and vagal (VNS) nerve stimulation. Whether these neurostimulation methods have a place in the management of iCCH patients remains to be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailMigraine - clinical neurophysiology.
Ambrosini, Anna; Magis, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Nappi, G.; Moskowitz, M. (Eds.) Headache (2010)

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and ... [more ▼]

Central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction is thought to be pivotal in migraine, and could occur at several levels: the brain (the cortex and its connections with subcortical nuclei), the brainstem, and even peripheral structures (e.g., trigeminal ganglion and nerve). As it is particularly suited to functional evaluation of various components of the nervous system, neurophysiological testing has become a valuable tool for investigating migraine pathophysiology and the effects of pharmacological treatment. However it has limited value for migraine diagnosis because of a high interindividual variability. In this chapter, we critically review and summarize the available published literature on neurophysiological approaches in migraine, i.e., electroencephalography, evoked and event-related potentials, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), electromyography, and cerebellar testing. The most relevant techniques for understanding migraine pathophysiological mechanisms are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailIs hypoxia-inducible factor 1 an actor in migraine pathogenesis?
TRUONG, Julie ULg; Mascetti, Laura; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

Poster (2009, May)

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See detailOccipital nerve stimulation for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache: long term follow-up up to 3 years
Gérardy, Pierre-Yves ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Allena, M. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009, January), 29(1),

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See detailMitochondrial DNA haplogroups influence response to Riboflavin in Migraineurs
Di Lorenzo, C.; Coppola, G.; Santorelli, F. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009, January), 29(1),

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See detailTonabersat, a gap-junction modulator: efficacy and safety in two randomized, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging studies of acute migraine.
Silberstein, S. D.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Gobel, H. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009), 29 Suppl 2

Tonabersat is a novel benzopyran derivative that blocks the cortical spreading depression proposed to be associated with migraine attacks. The ability of single oral doses of 15, 25, 40 and 80 mg of ... [more ▼]

Tonabersat is a novel benzopyran derivative that blocks the cortical spreading depression proposed to be associated with migraine attacks. The ability of single oral doses of 15, 25, 40 and 80 mg of tonabersat to relieve the symptoms of moderate to severe migraine was evaluated in 859 migraineurs enrolled in two dose-ranging, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trials, one international and the other North American. In the international study, significantly more patients given tonabersat than given placebo experienced relief of headache pain at 2 h (15 mg, 36.8%; 40 mg, 40.7%), the principal efficacy variable, and at 4 h (40 mg, 63.0%) and complete abolition of headache at 4 h (40 mg, 34.3%). None of the primary or secondary efficacy variables indicated significant differences between tonabersat and placebo in the North American study. Tonabersat was generally well tolerated, with dizziness and nausea the most common side-effects. Serious adverse events were uncommon, and no patient withdrew from either study because of adverse events. These results suggest a possible interplay between tonabersat pharmacokinetics (the relatively long time required to reach maximum plasma concentrations) and patient characteristics (previous triptan exposure) in the management of acute migraine attacks. Based on the pharmacokinetics and actions on cortical spreading depression, tonabersat may have potential value in migraine prophylaxis. [less ▲]

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See detailGlossopharyngeal neuralgia triggered by non-noxious stimuli at multiple cephalic and extracephalic sites.
ter Berg, J. W. M.; Dupont, P.; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009), 29(11), 1174-9

Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) triggered by non-noxious stimuli at multiple cephalic and extracephalic sites with positron emission tomography (PET) evidence for involvement of the upper brainstem has ... [more ▼]

Glossopharyngeal neuralgia (GN) triggered by non-noxious stimuli at multiple cephalic and extracephalic sites with positron emission tomography (PET) evidence for involvement of the upper brainstem has never been reported. We present such a patient, a 73-year-old man who since the age of 50 had suffered from GN with a high recurrence rate and very severe unilateral, non-familial GN episodes with very easy trigger zones widely extending beyond the n IX territory. Extensive neuroimaging and neurophysiological tests detected no precise underlying cause. PET scan revealed activation in the upper brainstem on extracephalic triggers. Single-fibre electromyography data will be discussed. We hypothesize that deficient inhibition as seen in trigeminal nociceptive reflexes on the level of brainstem interneurons, a functional lesion in the primary somatosensory cortex-sensory thalamic nuclei circuit and the dorsal column-thalamic pathway both activated by light touch may in part be involved in the extracephalic triggering. [less ▲]

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See detailChronic tension-type headache: what is new?
Fernandez-de-las-Penas, Cesar; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Current Opinion in Neurology (2009), 22(3), 254-61

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses current data on nosological boundaries related to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). RECENT FINDINGS ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review discusses current data on nosological boundaries related to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic strategies in chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). RECENT FINDINGS: Diagnostic criteria of CTTH should be adapted to improve its sensitivity against migraine. It seems that mechanical pain sensitivity is a consequence and not a causative factor of CTTH. Recent evidence is modifying previous knowledge about relationships between muscle tissues and CTTH, suggesting a potential role of muscle trigger points in the genesis of pain. An updated pain model suggests that headache perception can be explained by referred pain from trigger points in the craniocervical muscles, mediated through the spinal cord and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis rather than only tenderness of the muscles themselves. Different therapeutic strategies, pharmacological, physical therapy, psychological and acupuncture, are generally used. The therapeutic efficacy of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs remains incomplete. The tricyclic antidepressants are the most used first-line therapeutic agents for CTTH. Surprisingly, few controlled studies have been performed and not all of them have found an efficacy superior to placebo. Further, there is insufficient evidence to support/refute the efficacy of physical therapy in CTTH. SUMMARY: Although there is an increasing scientific interest in CTTH, future studies incorporating subgroups of patients who will likely to benefit from a specific treatment (clinical prediction rules) should be conducted. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial DNA haplogroups influence the therapeutic response to riboflavin in migraineurs.
Di Lorenzo, C.; Pierelli, F.; Coppola, G. et al

in Neurology (2009), 72(18), 1588-94

OBJECTIVES: In migraine, an interictal reduction of mitochondrial energy metabolism and a preventive effect of high-dose riboflavin were reported. To explore the relation between the two, we tested if the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: In migraine, an interictal reduction of mitochondrial energy metabolism and a preventive effect of high-dose riboflavin were reported. To explore the relation between the two, we tested if the therapeutic response to riboflavin is associated with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. We focused our attention on haplogroup H, which is known to differ from others in terms of energy metabolism. METHODS: Sixty-four migraineurs completed a 4-month open trial with riboflavin (400 mg QD) and were genotyped blindly for mtDNA haplogroups. RESULTS: Forty patients responded to riboflavin treatment and 24 were nonresponders. The mtDNA haplogroup H was found in 29 subjects (20 migraine without aura, 9 migraine with aura). Riboflavin responders were more numerous in the non-H group (67.5%). Conversely, nonresponders were mostly H (66.7%). The difference between the two groups was significant (chi(2) = 7.07; p = 0.01). The presence of aura had no influence on riboflavin's effectiveness (chi(2) = 0.113; p = 0.74) and was not associated with a particular haplogroup (chi(2) = 0.55; p = 0.46). CONCLUSIONS: In this pharmacogenetic study, riboflavin appears to be more effective in patients with migraine with non-H mitochondrial DNA haplotypes. The underlying mechanisms are unknown, but could be related to the association of haplogroup H with increased activity in complex I, which is a major target for riboflavin. Our results may have ethnic implications, since haplogroup H is chiefly found in the European population. [less ▲]

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See detailNitroglycerin sensitises in healthy subjects CNS structures involved in migraine pathophysiology: evidence from a study of nociceptive blink reflexes and visual evoked potentials.
Di Clemente, Laura; Coppola, Gianluca; Magis, Delphine ULg et al

in Pain (2009), 144(1-2), 156-61

Nitroglycerin (NTG), a NO donor, induces an attack in migraine patients approximately 4-6 h after administration. The causative mechanisms are not known, but the long delay leaves room for a central ... [more ▼]

Nitroglycerin (NTG), a NO donor, induces an attack in migraine patients approximately 4-6 h after administration. The causative mechanisms are not known, but the long delay leaves room for a central effect, such as a change in neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission of various CNS areas involved in pain and behaviour including trigeminal nucleus caudalis and monoaminergic brain stem nuclei. To explore the central action of NTG, we have studied its effects on amplitude and habituation of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and the visual evoked potential (VEP) before, 1 h and 4 h after administration of NTG (1.2 mg sublingual) or placebo (vehicle sublingual) in two groups of 10 healthy volunteers. We found a significant decrease in nBR pain and reflex thresholds both 1 and 4 h post-NTG. At the 4 h time point R2 latency was shorter (p=0.04) and R2 response area increased (p<0.01) after NTG but not after placebo. Habituation tended to become more pronounced after both NTG and placebo administration. There was a significant amplitude increase in the 5th VEP block (p=0.03) at 1h after NTG and in the 1st block (p=0.04) at 4 h. VEP habituation was replaced by potentiation at both delays after NTG; the change in habituation slope was significant at 1h (p=0.02). There were no significant VEP changes in subjects who received sublingual placebo. In conclusion, we found that in healthy subjects sublingual NTG, but not its vehicle, induces changes in a trigeminal nociceptive reflex and an evoked cortical response which are comparable to those found immediately before and during an attack of migraine. These changes could be relevant for the attack-triggering effect of NTG in migraineurs. [less ▲]

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See detailHabituation and migraine.
Coppola, Gianluca; Pierelli, Francesco; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neurobiology of Learning & Memory (2009), 92(2), 249-59

The most reproducible and ubiquitous interictal abnormality of the migraineurs' brain is lack of habituation in neuronal information processing. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. Increased neuronal ... [more ▼]

The most reproducible and ubiquitous interictal abnormality of the migraineurs' brain is lack of habituation in neuronal information processing. The underlying mechanisms are uncertain. Increased neuronal excitability, decreased inhibition or decreased pre-activation levels have all been proposed as possible culprits. The present review summarizes the available data on habituation in migraine patients obtained with different methodological approaches. We will discuss the change of habituation level over the migraine cycle and we will show that these data congruently indicate that the sensory cortices of migraineurs react excessively to repetitive, but not to a small series of stimuli. Although the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms of this hyper-responsivity must still be determined, we will describe experimental data suggesting that a dysrhythmic thalamo-cortical activity due to inadequate monoaminergic control might be a plausible explanation. [less ▲]

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See detailImplementation and evaluation of existing guidelines on the use of neurophysiological tests in non-acute migraine patients: a questionnaire survey of neurologists and primary care physicians.
Rossi, P.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Bolla, M. et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2009), 16(8), 937-42

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The main aims of this study were to evaluate: the diffusion, use and perception of the usefulness of the 2004 EFNS guidelines on neurophysiological testing in non-acute headache ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The main aims of this study were to evaluate: the diffusion, use and perception of the usefulness of the 2004 EFNS guidelines on neurophysiological testing in non-acute headache patients; the frequency with which the different neurophysiological tests were recommended in non-acute migraine patients by physicians aware or unaware of the guidelines; and the appropriateness of the reasons given for recommending neurophysiological tests. METHODS: One hundred and fifty physicians selected amongst the members of the Italian societies of general practitioner (GPs), neurologists and headache specialists were contacted via e-mail and invited to fill in a questionnaire specially created for the study. RESULTS: Ninety-two percent of the headache specialists, 8.6% of the neurologists and 0% of the GPs were already aware of the EFNS guidelines. A significantly higher proportion of headache specialists had not recommended any neurophysiological tests to the migraine patients they had seen in the previous 3 months, whereas these tests had frequently been prescribed by the GPs and neurologists. Overall, 80%, 42% and 42.6% of the reasons given by headache specialists, neurologists and GPs, respectively, for recommending neurophysiological testing in their migraine patients were appropriate (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The diffusion of the EFNS guidelines on neurophysiological tests and neuroimaging procedures was found to be very limited amongst neurologists and GPs. The physicians aware of the EFNS guidelines recommended neurophysiological tests to migraine patients less frequently and more appropriately than physicians who were not aware of them. The most frequent misconceptions regarding neurophysiological tests concerned their perceived capacity to discriminate between migraine and secondary headaches or between migraine and other primary headaches. [less ▲]

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See detailProposals for new standardized general diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches.
Olesen, J.; Steiner, T.; Bousser, M.-G. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2009), 29(12), 1331-6

Headache classification is a dynamic process through clinical testing and re-testing of current and proposed criteria. After publication of the second edition of the International Classification of ... [more ▼]

Headache classification is a dynamic process through clinical testing and re-testing of current and proposed criteria. After publication of the second edition of the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II), need arose for revisions in the classification of medication overuse headache and chronic migraine. These changes made apparent a further need for broader revisions to the standard formulation of diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches. Currently, the fourth criterion makes impossible the definitive diagnosis of a secondary headache until the underlying cause has resolved or been cured or greatly ameliorated by therapy, at which time the headache may no longer be present. Given that the main purpose of diagnostic criteria is to enable a diagnosis at the onset of a disease in order to guide treatment, this is unhelpful in clinical practice. In the present paper we propose maintaining a standard approach to the secondary headaches using a set of four criteria A, B, C and D, but we construct these so that the requirement for resolution or successful treatment is removed. The proposal for general diagnostic criteria for the secondary headaches will be entered into the internet-based version of the appendix of ICHD-II. During 2009 the Classification Committee will apply the general criteria to all the specific types of secondary headaches. These, and other changes, will be included in a revision of the entire classification entitled ICHD-IIR, expected to be published in 2010. ICHD-IIR will be printed and posted on the website and will be the official classification of the International Headache Society. Unfortunately, it will be necessary to translate ICHD-IIR into the many languages of the world, but the good news is that no major changes to the headache classification are then foreseen for the next 10 years. Until the printing of ICHD-IIR, the printed ICHD-II criteria remain in place for all other purposes. We issue a plea to the headache community to use and study these proposed general criteria for the secondary headaches in order to provide more evidence for their utility-before their incorporation in the main body of the classification. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interplay of two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CACNA1A gene may contribute to migraine susceptibility.
D'Onofrio, Mara; Ambrosini, Anna; Di Mambro, Alessandra et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2009), 453(1), 12-5

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs ... [more ▼]

Migraine is a common disorder with a significant genetic component. Mutations in the CACNA1A gene are found in hemiplegic migraine (HM). Basilar-type (BM), another subtype of migraine with aura, differs from HM only by the absence of motor deficits. BM and HM may thus share common genetic features. In the present study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CACNA1A gene were characterized in a population of migraine patients and healthy controls. The polymorphisms, E918D, predicting a glutamic acid-to-aspartic acid substitution at codon 918 and E993V, predicting a glutamic acid-to-valine substitution at codon 993, were frequently detected among patients and controls. Seven BM, 10 SHM, 5 FHM, 57 migraine with typical aura, 32 migraine without aura patients and 107 healthy controls were screened. The E918D and E993V SNPs were found in 30/117 (25.6%) and 32/117 (27.3%) migraine patients, respectively. The prevalence of these SNPs taken separately was not significantly different from that of control subjects (n=28/107, 26.2% for E918D; n=29/107 for E993V, 27.1%) neither for the total migraine population nor for the various migraine subtypes. By contrast, coexistence of both SNPs was more frequent in migraineurs (25/117, 21%) than in healthy controls (12/107, 11%; p=0.048), a difference that was significant for every migraine subtype. This result suggests that the interplay of minor genetic variants such as single nucleotide polymorphisms may influence the P/Q-type calcium channel function in several subtypes of migraine. [less ▲]

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