References of "Schoenen, Jean"
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See detailNeurono-Glial Interactions and Neural Plasticity
Moonen, Gustave ULg; Rogister, Bernard ULg; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Coleman, Paul; Higgins, G.; Phelps, C. (Eds.) Progress In Brain research: Neuronal Plasticity in aging and dementia (1990)

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo modulation of neurotransmitter phenotype in adult rat DRG neurons
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Delrée, P.; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Rapport annuel de la Fondation Médicale Reine Elisabeth (1990)

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See detailIn vitro and in vivo modulation of neurotransmitter phenotype in adult DRG neuron.
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Delrée, P.; Martin, Didier ULg et al

Conference (1990)

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See detailCytoarchitectural, dendroarchitectural and myeloarchitectural organization
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Faull, R. M. L.

in Paxinos, G. (Ed.) The Human Nervous System (1990)

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See detailSpinal cord: Chemoartitectural Organization
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Faul, R. M. L.

in Paxinos, G. (Ed.) The Human Nervous System (1990)

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See detailSpinal cord: Connections
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Grant, G.

in Paxinos, G. (Ed.) The Human Nervous System (1990)

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See detailNeurotransmission in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Riederer, P.; Kopp, N.; Pearson, J. (Eds.) An introduction to Neurotransmission in health and disease (1990)

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See detailContingent negative variation in psychopharmacology
Timsit-Berthier, M.; Ansseau, Marc ULg; Mantanus, H. et al

in Brunia, C. H. M.; Mulder, G.; Verbater, M. N. (Eds.) Event related potentials in brain research (1990)

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See detailThe contingent negative variation CNV during a three second foreperiod in migraine patients
Böcker, K. B. E.; Timsit-Berthier, M.; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Brunia, C. H. M.; Gaillard, A. W. K.; Kok, A. (Eds.) Psychophysiological Brain Research (1990)

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See detailAndrogen-dependent vasopressinergic neurons are involved in social recognition in rats.
Bluthe, R. M.; Schoenen, Jean ULg; Dantzer, R.

in Brain Research (1990), 519(1-2), 150-7

Socal recognition of juvenile conspecifics by adult male rats has been shown to be modulated by vasopressin. Because part of the extrahypothalamic vasopressinergic innervation of the brain is androgen ... [more ▼]

Socal recognition of juvenile conspecifics by adult male rats has been shown to be modulated by vasopressin. Because part of the extrahypothalamic vasopressinergic innervation of the brain is androgen-dependent, the present experiments were undertaken to assess possible interactions between androgens and vasopressin in social recognition. Castrated male rats displayed a temporary disruption of social recognition when they were tested 1 week after surgery. There was no impairment, however, when they were tested every other day following surgery. The peripheral injection of a vasopressor antagonist of vasopressin, dPTyr(Me)AVP (30 micrograms/kg) impaired social recognition in normal male rats but was ineffective in castrated ones. This was not due to an effect of castration on the basic pharmacological properties of dPTyr(Me)AVP since the antagonist peptide was still able to block the facilitating effects of vasopressin on social recognition in castrated male rats. Implantation of a testosterone-filled capsule in castrated male rats restored sensitivity of social recognition to the action of the vasopressin antagonist. These results suggest that androgen-dependent vasopressinergic neurons are physiologically involved in the modulation of social recognition in male rats. [less ▲]

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See detailThe dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cell population neurotransmitter phenotype and its modulation in vivo and in vitro
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Moonen, G.; Vanderhaeghen, J. J.

in Bignami, A.; Thomas, P. K. (Eds.) New Issues in Neurosciences Basic and Clinical Approches (1990)

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See detailMyositis During Borrelia Burgdorferi Infection (Lyme Disease)
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Sianard-Gainko, J.; Carpentier, M. et al

in Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (1989), 52(8), 1002-5

During the second stage of an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a young woman developed a myopathic syndrome characterised by severe muscular pains, incapacitating weakness of the proximal limb and ... [more ▼]

During the second stage of an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a young woman developed a myopathic syndrome characterised by severe muscular pains, incapacitating weakness of the proximal limb and the neck, as well as the bulbar muscles and elevated serum CK levels. Muscle biopsy revealed a non-inflammatory necrotising myopathy. B. burgdorferi infection was confirmed by a considerable rise of specific IgG antibodies. A course of high dose steroids alleviated the myalgias, but paresis began to improve only after treatment with antibiotics. Our observations confirm that B burgdorferi can cause, through an undertermined mechanism, a necrotising myopathy, in addition to the wide spectrum of already known neurological complications. [less ▲]

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See detailPurification and Culture of Adult Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons
Delree, P.; Leprince, Pierre ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1989), 23(2), 198-206

To study the trophic requirements of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) in vitro, we developed a purification procedure that yields highly enriched neuronal cultures. Forty to fifty ganglia are ... [more ▼]

To study the trophic requirements of adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRG) in vitro, we developed a purification procedure that yields highly enriched neuronal cultures. Forty to fifty ganglia are dissected from the spinal column of an adult rat. After enzymatic and mechanical dissociation of the ganglia, myelin debris are eliminated by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient. The resulting cell suspension is layered onto a nylon mesh with a pore size of 10 microns. Most of the neurons, the diameter of which ranged from 17 microns to greater than 100 microns, are retained on the upper surface of the sieve; most of the non-neuronal cells with a caliber of less than 10 microns after trypsinization go through it. Recovery of neurons is achieved by reversing the mesh onto a Petri dish containing culture medium. Neurons to non-neurons ratio is 1 to 10 in the initial cell suspension and 1 to 1 after separation. When these purified neurons are seeded at a density of 3,000 neurons/cm2 in 6 mm polyornithine-laminin (PORN-LAM) coated wells, neuronal survival (assessed by the ability to extend neurites), measured after 48 hr of culture, is very low (from 0 to 16%). Addition of nerve growth factor (NGF) does not improve neuronal survival. However, when neurons are cultured in the presence of medium conditioned (CM) by astrocytes or Schwann cells, 60-80% of the seeded, dye-excluding neurons survive. So, purified adult DRG neurons require for their short-term survival and regeneration in culture, a trophic support that is present in conditioned medium from PNS or CNS glia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) [less ▲]

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See detailNeurotransmitter Phenotype Plasticity in Cultured Dissociated Adult Rat Dorsal Root Ganglia: An Immunocytochemical Study
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Delree, P.; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1989), 22(4), 473-87

Culturing sympathetic ganglion neurons in vitro may modify phenotypic expression of some neurotransmitters. For dorsal root ganglia (DRG), contradictory results have been reported; most studies have used ... [more ▼]

Culturing sympathetic ganglion neurons in vitro may modify phenotypic expression of some neurotransmitters. For dorsal root ganglia (DRG), contradictory results have been reported; most studies have used immature material. We have therefore performed a detailed immunocytochemical analysis of the transmitter content of cultured adult rat DRG neurons. To demonstrate possible modifications of neurotransmitter phenotypes, we have compared the results obtained with the same techniques on neurons cultured for 3 days and on freshly dissociated DRG cells. Also, the transmitter profile of cultured neurons was compared with that known from in situ studies. Out of 22 antigens studied, 20 were detected in cultured DRG neurons. All of them were expressed in small and/or intermediate-sized cells. Large neurons only contained CGRP, VIP, NPY, beta-END, ENK, and GABA. The percentage of immunostained neurons varied for the various antisera: less than 10% of cultured neurons were positive for ENK, beta-LPH, beta-END, DYN, VASO, and OXY; 10-30% for SOM, CCK, CAT, and SP; and greater than 30% for NPY, CRF, GLU, NT, VIP, GABA, GRP, CGRP, 5-HT, and TRH. In the latter two groups of transmitters (except CGRP), the proportion of immunoreactive neurons was by far larger in cultured than in freshly dissociated DRG. The most pronounced (greater than 25%) increase in the proportion of positively stained neurons after culturing was observed for the GRP, CRF, TRH, and 5-HT antisera. Serotonin was the only transmitter identified in cultured but not in freshly dissociated cells. These data indicate, on one hand, that various antigens, for example, CAT, GABA, NT, TRH, NPY, beta-LPH, and beta-END, which up to now have not been described in DRG in situ, can be detected immunocytochemically a few hours after dissociation of adult rat DRG. On the other hand, several transmitters, for example, VIP, NPY, SP, GABA, GLU, NT, GRP, CRF, TRH, and 5-HT, are expressed in a significantly higher proportion of cells in cultured than in freshly dissociated preparations. This might reflect a change in the phenotypic expression of transmitters due to the new environment generated by the culture conditions, a hypothesis that can be tested by measuring specific mRNA levels. Moreover, considering the plasticity and multipotentiality of their transmitter phenotype, cultured adult DRG neurons might represent an interesting material for autografts into the injured central nervous system. [less ▲]

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See detailParaplégie traumatique. Mise au point et analyse d'un modèle expérimental.
Martin, Didier ULg; Delrée, P.; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (1989, March)

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See detailChronic headaches associated with analgesics and/or ergotamine abuse: a clinical survey of 434 consecutive out-patients
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Lenarduzzi, P.; Sianard-Gainko, J.

in Clifford Rose, F. (Ed.) New Advances in Headache Research (1989)

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See detailExteroceptive silent periods of temporalis muscle in headache
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Van Steenberghe, D.; De Laat, A. (Eds.) EMG of jaw reflexes in man (1989)

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