References of "Schoenen, Jean"
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See detailGenome-wide association analysis identifies susceptibility loci for migraine without aura.
Freilinger, Tobias; Anttila, Verneri; de Vries, Boukje et al

in Nature Genetics (2012), 44(7), 777-82

Migraine without aura is the most common form of migraine, characterized by recurrent disabling headache and associated autonomic symptoms. To identify common genetic variants associated with this ... [more ▼]

Migraine without aura is the most common form of migraine, characterized by recurrent disabling headache and associated autonomic symptoms. To identify common genetic variants associated with this migraine type, we analyzed genome-wide association data of 2,326 clinic-based German and Dutch individuals with migraine without aura and 4,580 population-matched controls. We selected SNPs from 12 loci with 2 or more SNPs associated with P values of <1 x 10(-5) for replication testing in 2,508 individuals with migraine without aura and 2,652 controls. SNPs at two of these loci showed convincing replication: at 1q22 (in MEF2D; replication P = 4.9 x 10(-4); combined P = 7.06 x 10(-11)) and at 3p24 (near TGFBR2; replication P = 1.0 x 10(-4); combined P = 1.17 x 10(-9)). In addition, SNPs at the PHACTR1 and ASTN2 loci showed suggestive evidence of replication (P = 0.01; combined P = 3.20 x 10(-8) and P = 0.02; combined P = 3.86 x 10(-8), respectively). We also replicated associations at two previously reported migraine loci in or near TRPM8 and LRP1. This study identifies the first susceptibility loci for migraine without aura, thereby expanding our knowledge of this debilitating neurological disorder. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidsiciplinary Management of Migraine: Pharmacological, Manual And Other Therapies.
Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Chaitow, L; Schoenen, Jean ULg

Book published by Jones & Bartlett Learning (2012)

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See detailA comprehensive view of migraine pathophysiology
Gantenbein, A; Sándor, P; Riederer, F et al

in Fernandez-de-las-Penas, C; Chaitow, L; Schoenen, Jean (Eds.) Multidisciplinary Management of Migraine (2012)

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See detailPreventive Antimigraine Drugs
Silberstein, SD; Latsko, M; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Fernandez-de-las-Penas, C; Chaitow, L; Schoenen, Jean (Eds.) Multidisciplinary Management of Migraine (2012)

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See detailEffects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on somatosensory evoked potentials and high frequency oscillations in migraine.
Coppola, Gianluca; De Pasqua, Victor; Pierelli, Francesco et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2012), 32(9), 700-9

Background: In previous studies we found that high-frequency somatosensory oscillations (HFOs) reflecting thalamo-cortical activation were decreased in migraineurs between attacks and that high-frequency ... [more ▼]

Background: In previous studies we found that high-frequency somatosensory oscillations (HFOs) reflecting thalamo-cortical activation were decreased in migraineurs between attacks and that high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was able to normalize the habituation deficit of visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Here we study the effects of activating (10 Hz) or inhibiting (1 Hz) rTMS on conventional low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs). Subjects and methods: rTMS was applied on the motor cortex of 13 healthy volunteers (HVs) and 13 migraine without aura (MO) patients. We measured N20-P25 LF-SSEP amplitude and habituation, and maximal peak-to-peak amplitude of early and late HFOs before and after rTMS. Results: In HVs, 1 Hz rTMS significantly reduced the amplitude of the first LF-SSEP block and its habituation. In MO patients, 10 Hz rTMS increased the amplitude of the first block and induced habituation. Ten Hz rTMS produced an increase of late HFO in both groups, but more interestingly, in MO patients also significantly increased the early HFOs, which are reduced at baseline compared to those of HVs. Conclusions: These data confirm for SSEP that excitatory rTMS can normalize habituation in migraine patients and show that this is accompanied by early an HFO increase, which is thought to reflect thalamo-cortical activity. Taken together with similar effects we observed for VEPs, this finding supports the hypothesis that dysfunctioning thalamo-cortical loops may be responsible for the interictal habituation deficit in migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy and tolerability of lasmiditan, an oral 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist, for the acute treatment of migraine: a phase 2 randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, dose-ranging study.
Farkkila, Markus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Geraud, Gilles et al

in Lancet Neurology (2012), 11(5), 405-13

BACKGROUND: Lasmiditan (COL-144) is a novel, centrally acting, highly selective 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist without vasoconstrictor activity that seemed effective when given as an intravenous infusion in a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Lasmiditan (COL-144) is a novel, centrally acting, highly selective 5-HT(1F) receptor agonist without vasoconstrictor activity that seemed effective when given as an intravenous infusion in a proof-of-concept migraine study. We aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of oral lasmiditan for the acute treatment of migraine. METHODS: In this multicentre, double-blind, parallel-group, dose-ranging study in 43 headache centres in five European countries, patients with migraine with and without aura and who were not using prophylaxis were randomly assigned (1:1:1:1:1) to treat one moderate or severe attack at home with 50 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, or 400 mg lasmiditan, or placebo. Study drug and placebo were supplied in identical numbered tablet packs. The randomisation code was generated by an independent statistician. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was dose response for headache relief (moderate or severe becoming mild or none) at 2 h. The primary analysis was done in the modified intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00883051. FINDINGS: Between July 8 2009, and Feb 18, 2010, 512 patients were randomly assigned to treatment, 391 of whom received treatment. 86 patients received placebo (81 included in primary analysis) and 305 received lasmiditan (50 mg n=79, 100 mg n=81, 200 mg n=69, and 400 mg n=68 included in primary analysis). There was a linear association between headache response rate at 2 h and lasmiditan dose (Cochran-Armitage test p<0.0001). Every lasmiditan treatment dose significantly improved headache response at 2 h compared with placebo (lasmiditan 50 mg: difference 17.9%, 95% CI 3.9-32.1, p=0.022; 100 mg: 38.2%, 24.1-52.4, p<0.0001; 200 mg: 28.8%, 9.6-39.9, p=0.0018; 400 mg: 38.7%, 23.9-53.6, p<0.0001). The proportion of patients with treatment-emergent adverse events increased with increasing doses (53/82 [65%], 59/82 [72%], 61/71 [86%], and 59/70 [84%] for lasmiditan 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg, respectively vs 19/86 [22%] for placebo). Most adverse events were mild or moderate in intensity, with 16 of 82 (20%), 23 of 82 (28%), 28 of 71 (39%), and 31 of 70 (44%) of patients on lasmiditan 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg, respectively reporting a severe adverse event compared with five of 86 (6%) on placebo. The most common adverse events were CNS related and included dizziness, fatigue, vertigo, paraesthesia, and somnolence. INTERPRETATION: Oral lasmiditan seems to be safe and effective in the acute treatment of migraine. Further assessment in larger placebo-controlled and triptan-controlled trials are needed to assess the potential role of lasmiditan in acute migraine therapy. FUNDING: CoLucid Pharmaceuticals. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of systemic kynurenine on cortical spreading depression and its modulation by sex hormones in rat.
Chauvel, Virginie ULg; Vamos, Eniko; Pardutz, Arpad et al

in Experimental Neurology (2012), 236(2), 207-14

BACKGROUND: The aura symptoms in migraine are most likely due to cortical spreading depression (CSD). CSD is favored by NMDA receptor activation and increased cortical excitability. The latter probably ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The aura symptoms in migraine are most likely due to cortical spreading depression (CSD). CSD is favored by NMDA receptor activation and increased cortical excitability. The latter probably explains why migraine with aura may appear when estrogen levels are high, like during pregnancy. Kynurenic acid, a derivative of tryptophan metabolism, is an endogenous NMDA receptor antagonist whose cerebral concentrations can be augmented by systemic administration of its precursor l-kynurenine. OBJECTIVE: To determine if exogenous administration of l-kynurenine is able to influence KCl-induced CSD in rat, if the effect is sex-dependent and if it differs in females between the phases of the estrous cycle. METHODS: Adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group) received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of l-kynurenine (L-KYN, 300mg/kg), L-KYN combined with probenecid (L-KYN+PROB) that increases cortical concentration of KYNA by blocking its excretion from the central nervous system, probenecid alone (PROB, 200mg/kg) or NaCl. Cortical kynurenic acid concentrations were determined by HPLC (n=7). Thirty minutes after the injections, CSDs were elicited by application of 1M KCl over the occipital cortex and recorded by DC electrocorticogram. In NaCl and L-KYN groups, supplementary females were added and CSD frequency was analyzed respective to the phases of the estrous cycle determined by vaginal smears. RESULTS: In both sexes, PROB, L-KYN and L-KYN+PROB increased cortical kynurenic acid level. PROB, L-KYN and L-KYN+PROB with increasing potency decreased CSD frequency in female rats, while in males such an effect was significant only for L-KYN+PROB. The inhibitory effect of L-KYN on CSD frequency in females was most potent in diestrus. CONCLUSION: l-Kynurenine administration suppresses CSD, most likely by increasing kynurenic acid levels in the cortex. Females are more sensitive to this suppressive effect of l-kynurenine than males. These results emphasize the role of sex hormones in migraine and open interesting novel perspectives for its preventive treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailMesenchymal Stem Cell Graft Improves Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats through Neurotrophic and Pro-Angiogenic Actions.
Quertainmont, Renaud; Cantinieaux, Dorothée ULg; Botman, Olivier et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(6), 39500

Numerous strategies have been managed to improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) but an optimal strategy doesn't exist yet. Actually, it is the complexity of the injured spinal cord ... [more ▼]

Numerous strategies have been managed to improve functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) but an optimal strategy doesn't exist yet. Actually, it is the complexity of the injured spinal cord pathophysiology that begets the multifactorial approaches assessed to favour tissue protection, axonal regrowth and functional recovery. In this context, it appears that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could take an interesting part. The aim of this study is to graft MSCs after a spinal cord compression injury in adult rat to assess their effect on functional recovery and to highlight their mechanisms of action. We found that in intravenously grafted animals, MSCs induce, as early as 1 week after the graft, an improvement of their open field and grid navigation scores compared to control animals. At the histological analysis of their dissected spinal cord, no MSCs were found within the host despite their BrdU labelling performed before the graft, whatever the delay observed: 7, 14 or 21 days. However, a cytokine array performed on spinal cord extracts 3 days after MSC graft reveals a significant increase of NGF expression in the injured tissue. Also, a significant tissue sparing effect of MSC graft was observed. Finally, we also show that MSCs promote vascularisation, as the density of blood vessels within the lesioned area was higher in grafted rats. In conclusion, we bring here some new evidences that MSCs most likely act throughout their secretions and not via their own integration/differentiation within the host tissue. [less ▲]

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See detailSustained effeciveness of occipital nerve stimulation in drug-resistant chronic cluster headache
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Gerardy, Pierre-Yves; Remacle, Jean-Michel et al

in Headache (2011)

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See detailKynurenic acid is able to suppress cortical spreading depression and the effect size is sex hormone dependent
Chauvel, Virginie ULg; Vamos, Eniko; Pardutz, Arpat et al

Poster (2011, June)

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See detailInvolvement of placental growth factor in Wallerian degeneration
Chaballe, Linda ULg; Close, Pierre ULg; SEMPELS, Maxime ULg et al

in Glia (2011), 59(3), 379-396

Wallerian degeneration (WD) is an inflammatory process of nerve degeneration, which occurs more rapidly in the peripheral nervous system compared with the central nervous system, resulting, respectively ... [more ▼]

Wallerian degeneration (WD) is an inflammatory process of nerve degeneration, which occurs more rapidly in the peripheral nervous system compared with the central nervous system, resulting, respectively in successful and aborted axon regeneration. In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) and macrophages, under the control of a network of cytokines and chemokines, represent the main cell types involved in this process. Within this network, the role of placental growth factor (PlGF) remains totally unknown. However, properties like monocyte activation/attraction, ability to increase expression of pro-inflammatory molecules, as well as neuroprotective effects, make it a candidate likely implicated in this process. Also, nothing is described about the expression and localization of this molecule in the peripheral nervous system. To address these original questions, we decided to study PlGF expression under physiological and degenerative conditions and to explore its role in WD, using a model of sciatic nerve transection in wild-type and Pgf(-/-) mice. Our data show dynamic changes of PlGF expression, from periaxonal in normal nerve to SCs 24h postinjury, in parallel with a p65/NF-κB recruitment on Pgf promoter. After injury, SC proliferation is reduced by 30% in absence of PlGF. Macrophage invasion is significantly delayed in Pgf(-/-) mice compared with wild-type mice, which results in worse functional recovery. MCP-1 and proMMP-9 exhibit a 3-fold reduction of their relative expressions in Pgf(-/-) injured nerves, as demonstrated by cytokine array. In conclusion, this work originally describes PlGF as a novel member of the cytokine network of WD. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of kynurenic acid on sensitivity to cortical spreading depression in rats
Chauvel, Virginie ULg; Vamos, Eniko; Pardutz, Arpat et al

Poster (2011, January 31)

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See detailEffects of light deprivation on visual evoked potentials in migraine without aura.
Coppola, Gianluca; Cremers, Julien ULg; GERARD, Pascale ULg et al

in BMC Neurology (2011), 11

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying the interictal habituation deficit of cortical visual evoked potentials (VEP) in migraine are not well understood. Abnormal long-term functional plasticity of the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The mechanisms underlying the interictal habituation deficit of cortical visual evoked potentials (VEP) in migraine are not well understood. Abnormal long-term functional plasticity of the visual cortex may play a role and it can be assessed experimentally by light deprivation (LD). METHODS: We have compared the effects of LD on VEP in migraine patients without aura between attacks (MO, n = 17) and in healthy volunteers (HV, n = 17). Six sequential blocks of 100 averaged VEP at 3.1 Hz were recorded before and after 1 hour of LD. We measured VEP P100 amplitude of the 1st block of 100 sweeps and its change over 5 sequential blocks of 100 responses. RESULTS: In HV, the consequence of LD was a reduction of 1st block VEP amplitude and of the normal habituation pattern. By contrast, in MO patients, the interictal habituation deficit was not significantly modified, although 1st block VEP amplitude, already lower than in HV before LD, further decreased after LD. CONCLUSIONS: Light deprivation is thought to decrease both excitatory and subsequent inhibitory processes in visual cortex, which is in line with our findings in healthy volunteers. The VEP results in migraine patients suggest that early excitation was adequately suppressed, but not the inhibitory mechanisms occurring during long term stimulation and habituation. Accordingly, deficient intracortical inhibition is unlikely to be a primary factor in migraine pathophysiology and the habituation deficit. [less ▲]

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See detailHabituation of evoked responses is greater in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine than in controls: a contrast with the common forms of migraine.
Hansen, Jacob Moller; Bolla, Monica; Magis, Delphine ULg et al

in European Journal of Neurology (2011)

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce ... [more ▼]

Background: Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare, dominantly inherited subtype of migraine with transient hemiplegia during the aura phase. Mutations in at least three different genes can produce the FHM phenotype. The mutated FHM genes code for ion transport proteins that animal and cellular studies have associated with disturbed ion homeostasis, altered cellular excitability, neurotransmitter release, and decreased threshold for cortical spreading depression. The common forms of migraine are characterized interictally by a habituation deficit of cortical and subcortical evoked responses that has been attributed to neuronal dysexcitability. FHM and the common forms of migraine are thought to belong to a spectrum of migraine phenotypes with similar pathophysiology, and we therefore examined whether an abnormal habituation pattern would also be found in FHM patients. Methods: In a group of genotyped FHM patients (five FHM-1, four FHM-2), we measured habituation of visual evoked potentials (VEP), auditory evoked potentials including intensity dependence (IDAP), the nociception-specific blink reflex (nsBR) and compared the results to a group of healthy volunteers (HV). Results: FHM patients had a more pronounced habituation during VEP (P = 0.025) and nsBR recordings (P = 0.023) than HV. There was no difference for IDAP, but the slope tended to be steeper in FHM. Conclusion: Contrary to the common forms of migraine, FHM patients are not characterized by a deficient, but rather by an increased habituation in cortical/brain stem evoked activities. These results suggest differences between FHM and the common forms of migraine, as far as central neuronal processing is concerned. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-mortem assessment of rat spinal cord injury and white matter sparing using inversion recovery-supported proton density magnetic resonance imaging
Scholtes, Félix ULg; Theunissen, E.; Phan Ba, Remy ULg et al

in Spinal Cord : The Official Journal of the International Medical Society of Paraplegia (2011)

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