References of "Schoenen, Jean"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnimal models of migraine: looking at the component parts of a complex disorder
Bergerot, A.; Holland, P. R.; Akerman, S. et al

in European Journal of Neuroscience (2006), 24(6), 1517-1534

Animal models of human disease have been extremely helpful both in advancing the understanding of brain disorders and in developing new therapeutic approaches. Models for studying headache mechanisms ... [more ▼]

Animal models of human disease have been extremely helpful both in advancing the understanding of brain disorders and in developing new therapeutic approaches. Models for studying headache mechanisms, particularly those directed at migraine, have been developed and exploited efficiently in the last decade, leading to better understanding of the potential mechanisms of the disorder and of the action for antimigraine treatments. Model systems employed have focused on the pain-producing cranial structures, the large vessels and dura mater, in order to provide reproducible physiological measures that could be subject to pharmacological exploration. A wide range of methods using both in vivo and in vitro approaches are now employed; these range from manipulation of the mouse genome in order to produce animals with human disease-producing mutations, through sensitive immunohistochemical methods to vascular, neurovascular and electrophysiological studies. No one model system in experimental animals can explain all the features of migraine; however, the systems available have begun to offer ways to dissect migraine's component parts to allow a better understanding of the problem and the development of new treatment strategies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTranscranial magnetic stimulation of the visual cortex induces somatotopically organized qualia in blind subjects
Kupers, R.; Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Maertens De Noordhout, Alain ULg et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2006), 103(35), 13256-13260

After loss of a particular sensory channel, the deprived cortex can be activated by inputs from other sensory modalities. It is not known whether activation of the rewired cortex evokes subjective ... [more ▼]

After loss of a particular sensory channel, the deprived cortex can be activated by inputs from other sensory modalities. It is not known whether activation of the rewired cortex evokes subjective experiences characteristic of that cortex or consistent with the rerouted sensory information. In a previous study, blind subjects were trained to perform visual tasks with a tongue display unit, a sensory substitution device that translates visual displays into electrotactile tongue stimulation. This cross-modal sensory stimulation activated their visual cortices. We now extend this finding by using transcranial magnetic stimulation to examine the perceptual correlates of training-induced plastic responses. We find that blind subjects proficient with the use of the tongue display unit report somatopicaily organized tactile sensations that are referred to the tongue when transcranial magnetic stimulation is applied over the occipital cortex. No such sensations were evoked in trained, blindfolded, seeing control subjects who performed the sensory substitution task equally well. These data show that the perceptual correlate of activity in a given cortical area reflects the characteristics of its novel sensory input source. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMigraine with Urticaria
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Cremers, Julien ULg; Ambrosini, A. et al

in Neurology (2006), 67(4), 682

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDelayed GM-CSF treatment stimulates axonal regeneration and functional recovery in paraplegic rats via an increased BDNF expression by endogenous macrophages
Bouhy, Delphine; Malgrange, Brigitte ULg; Multon, Sylvie ULg et al

in FASEB Journal (2006), 20(8), 12391241

Macrophages (monocytes/microglia) could play a critical role in central nervous system repair. We have previously found a synchronism between the regression of spontaneous axonal regeneration and the ... [more ▼]

Macrophages (monocytes/microglia) could play a critical role in central nervous system repair. We have previously found a synchronism between the regression of spontaneous axonal regeneration and the deactivation of macrophages 3-4 wk after a compression-injury of rat spinal cord. To explore whether reactivation of endogenous macrophages might be beneficial for spinal cord repair, we have studied the effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the same paraplegia model and in cell cultures. There was a significant, though transient, improvement of locomotor recovery after a single delayed intraperitoneal injection of 2 mu g GM-CSF, which also increased significantly the expression of Cr3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor ( BDNF) by macrophages at the lesion site. At longer survival delays, axonal regeneration was significantly enhanced in GMCSF-treated rats. In vitro, BV2 microglial cells expressed higher levels of BDNF in the presence of GM-CSF and neurons cocultured with microglial cells activated by GM-CSF generated more neurites, an effect blocked by a BDNF antibody. These experiments suggest that GM-CSF could be an interesting treatment option for spinal cord injury and that its beneficial effects might be mediated by BDNF.-Bouhy, D., Malgrange, B., Multon, S., Poirrier, A. L., Scholtes, F., Schoenen, J., Franzen, R. Delayed GM-CSF treatment stimulates axonal regeneration and functional recovery in paraplegic rats via an increased BDNF expression by endogenous macrophages. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNeurophysiological features of the migrainous brain
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Neurological Sciences (2006), 27(Suppl. 2), 77-81

Migraine is a disorder in which central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction might play a pivotal role. As there are no consistent structural disturbances, clinical neurophysiology methods seem particularly ... [more ▼]

Migraine is a disorder in which central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction might play a pivotal role. As there are no consistent structural disturbances, clinical neurophysiology methods seem particularly suited to study its pathophysiology. This chapter will focus on a review of neurophysiological studies that have provided an insight into migraine pathogenesis. The results are in part contradictory, which may be due to the methodology, patient selection or timing of study. Nonetheless, quantitative electroencephalography and magnetoencephalography recordings during migraine attacks provide strong, though indirect, evidence favouring the occurrence of spreading cortical depression during attacks of migraine with, and possibly without, aura. Evoked cortical potential and nociceptive blink reflex studies demonstrate that lack of habituation during repetitive stimulation is a reproducible CNS dysfunction interictally in both migraine with and without aura. Transcranial magnetic stimulations show excitability changes of the visual cortex. The interictal migrainous CNS dysfunction is likely to play a role in migraine pathogenesis, has a familial character and undergoes periodic modulations with quasi-normalisation just before, during an attack and after treatment with certain prophylactic agents. In addition, neurophysiological methods have revealed subclinical abnormalities of cerebellar function and neuromuscular transmission, which may improve phenotyping of migraineurs for genetic and therapeutic studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLes céphalées par abus d'antalgiques et d'anti-migraineux
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(4), 217-22

Medication overuse headache (MOH) insidiously evolves from episodic migraine or tension-type headache because of overconsumption of analgesics, ergotamine or triptans. It affects 1-2% of the general ... [more ▼]

Medication overuse headache (MOH) insidiously evolves from episodic migraine or tension-type headache because of overconsumption of analgesics, ergotamine or triptans. It affects 1-2% of the general population, but 15-20% of patients attending specialized headache centers. The precise neurobiologic mechanisms underlying this complication of episodic headaches are not well understood. Abnormalities of central monoaminergic systems have been suggested and substance dependence is more frequent in personal and family histories of affected subjects. In a recent FDG-PET study of 16 migraineurs with MOH before and after analgesics withdrawal we found a persistent hypometabolism of the medial orbitofrontal cortex, comparable to the one described after withdrawal in substance abuse. The orbitofrontal cortex plays a pivotal role in drive, decision-making and drug dependence. We postulate that its hypoactivity predisposes certain migraineurs to MOH and to relapse after withdrawal. There is no unique management strategy for these patients, but medication withdrawal is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of preventive treatments and headache improvement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOrbitofrontal cortex involvement in chronic analgesic-overuse headache evolving from episodic migraine
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg; Di Clemente, Laura et al

in Brain (2006), 129(Pt 2), 543-550

The way in which medication overuse transforms episodic migraine into chronic daily headache is unknown. To search for candidate brain areas involved in this process, we measured glucose metabolism with ... [more ▼]

The way in which medication overuse transforms episodic migraine into chronic daily headache is unknown. To search for candidate brain areas involved in this process, we measured glucose metabolism with 18-FDG PET in 16 chronic migraineurs with analgesic overuse before and 3 weeks after medication withdrawal and compared the data with those of a control population (n = 68). Before withdrawal, the bilateral thalamus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate gyrus, insula/ventral striatum and right inferior parietal lobule were hypometabolic, while the cerebellar vermis was hypermetabolic. All dysmetabolic areas recovered to almost normal glucose uptake after withdrawal of analgesics, except the OFC where a further metabolic decrease was found. A subanalysis showed that most of the orbitofrontal hypometabolism was due to eight patients overusing combination analgesics and/or an ergotamine-caffeine preparation. Medication overuse headache is thus associated with reversible metabolic changes in pain processing structures like other chronic pain disorders, but also with persistent orbitofrontal hypofunction. The latter is known to occur in drug dependence and could predispose subgroups of migraineurs to recurrent analgesic overuse. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInduction of long-lasting changes of visual cortex excitability by five daily sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in healthy volunteers and migraine patients
Fumal, Arnaud ULg; Coppola, G.; Bohotin, V. et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2006), 26(2), 143-149

We have shown that in healthy volunteers (HV) one session of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the visual cortex induces dishabituation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) on ... [more ▼]

We have shown that in healthy volunteers (HV) one session of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the visual cortex induces dishabituation of visual evoked potentials (VEPs) on average for 30 min, while in migraineurs one session of 10 Hz rTMS replaces the abnormal VEP potentiation by a normal habituation for 9 min. In the present study, we investigated whether repeated rTMS sessions (1 Hz in eight HV; 10 Hz in eight migraineurs) on 5 consecutive days can modify VEPs for longer periods. In all eight HV, the 1 Hz rTMS-induced dishabituation increased in duration over consecutive sessions and persisted between several hours (n = 4) and several weeks (n = 4) after the fifth session. In six out eight migraineurs, the normalization of VEP habituation by 10 Hz rTMS lasted longer after each daily stimulation but did not exceed several hours after the last session, except in two patients, where it persisted for 2 days and 1 week. Daily rTMS can thus induce long-lasting changes in cortical excitability and VEP habituation pattern. Whether this effect may be useful in preventative migraine therapy remains to be determined. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (7 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHerbal medicines and vitamins
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Magis, Delphine ULg

in Lipton, R. B.; Bigal, M. E. (Eds.) Migraines and Other headache disorders (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuture preventive therapy: are there promising drug targets
Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Headache Currents (2006), 3

Detailed reference viewed: 11 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElectrophysiological response patterns of primary sensory cortices in migraine.
Ambrosini, Anna; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2006), 7(6), 377-88

Migraine is an ictal disorder characterised by a particular vulnerability of patients to sensory overload, both during and outside of the attack. Central nervous system dysfunctions are supposed to play a ... [more ▼]

Migraine is an ictal disorder characterised by a particular vulnerability of patients to sensory overload, both during and outside of the attack. Central nervous system dysfunctions are supposed to play a pivotal role in migraine. Electroneurophysiological methods, which aim to investigate sensory processing, seem thus particularly appropriate to study the pathophysiology of migraine. We have thus reviewed evoked potential studies performed in migraine patients. Although results are in part contradictory, these studies nonetheless demonstrate an interictal dysfunction of sensory cortices, and possibly of subcortical structures, in migraine with and without aura. The predominant abnormality is a deficient habituation of evoked responses to repeated stimuli, probably due to cortical, and possibly widespread neural, "dysexcitability". [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailForamen ovale perméable et migraines: association fortuite ou relation causale?
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Burette, P.; Materne, P.

in Revue Médicale de Liège (2006), 61(5-6, May-Jun), 362-8

Epidemiologic studies have shown a clear comorbidity between migraine with aura and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Under the age of 55, migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke and a ... [more ▼]

Epidemiologic studies have shown a clear comorbidity between migraine with aura and a patent foramen ovale (PFO). Under the age of 55, migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke and a proportion of the latter is due to a PFO. It remains to be determined whether PFO is causally related to migraine attacks, or is a fortuitous association due to common genetic factors. Cortical spreading depression which is the underlying mechanism of the migrainous aura, could be favoured by a PFO. Several retrospective and uncontrolled studies suggest that percutaneous closure of a PFO for stroke or decompression illness in divers reduces frequency of migraine attacks with, but also without aura. Multicentric, prospective and controlled trials of this intervention in migraineurs are underway or in preparation. As long as their results are not known, there is no rationale for proposing PFO closure for migraine. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCorrelation of postmortem 9.4 tesla magnetic resonance imaging and immunohistopathology of the human thoracic spinal cord 7 months after traumatic cervical spine injury.
Scholtes, Félix ULg; Adriaensens, Peter; Storme, Liesbet et al

in Neurosurgery (2006), 59(3), 671-8671-8

OBJECTIVE: To correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with immunohistopathology in the injured human spinal cord. METHODS: Postmortem MRI scans at a field strength of 9.4 T, as well as ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To correlate high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with immunohistopathology in the injured human spinal cord. METHODS: Postmortem MRI scans at a field strength of 9.4 T, as well as standard histology and immunohistochemistry, were performed on an excised specimen of human high thoracic spinal cord, obtained 7 months after the initial trauma, several segments below a severe spinal cord lesion (C5). RESULTS: A precise correlation is described between MRI and immunohistochemistry of the long white matter tracts undergoing Wallerian degeneration and of an extension of the cervical lesion into the high thoracic cord. CONCLUSION: MRI, the only imaging technique that currently provides useful information on the spinal cord parenchyma after trauma, is rapidly evolving. High-field scanners of up to 9.4 T are being clinically tested. The present postmortem investigation of an isolated spinal cord specimen demonstrates the precise correlation that can be achieved between imaging and pathology. In future investigations, this type of technique can lead to a more precise description of spinal cord injuries and their consequences in remote tissue. Translation into the clinical setting will improve diagnosis and follow-up of spinal cord injured patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (11 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailNew appendix criteria open for a broader concept of chronic migraine.
Olesen, J.; Bousser, M*-G; Diener, H*-C et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2006), 26(6), 742-6

After the introduction of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache as diagnostic entities in The International Classification of Headache Disorders, Second Edition, ICHD-2, it has been shown that ... [more ▼]

After the introduction of chronic migraine and medication overuse headache as diagnostic entities in The International Classification of Headache Disorders, Second Edition, ICHD-2, it has been shown that very few patients fit into the diagnostic criteria for chronic migraine (CM). The system of being able to use CM and the medication overuse headache (MOH) diagnosis only after discontinuation of overuse has proven highly unpractical and new data have suggested a much more liberal use of these diagnoses. The International Headache Classification Committee has, therefore, worked out the more inclusive criteria for CM and MOH presented in this paper. These criteria are included in the appendix of ICHD-2 and are meant primarily for further scientific evaluation but may be used already now for inclusion into drug trials, etc. It is now recommended that the MOH diagnosis should no longer request improvement after discontinuation of medication overuse but should be given to patients if they have a primary headache plus ongoing medication overuse. The latter is defined as previously, i.e. 10 days or more of intake of triptans, ergot alkaloids mixed analgesics or opioids and 15 days or more of analgesics/NSAIDs or the combined use of more than one substance. If these new criteria for CM and MOH prove useful in future testing, the plan is to include them in a future revised version of ICHD-2. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamilial basilar migraine associated with a new mutation in the ATP1A2 gene
Ambrosini, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Grieco, G. S. et al

in Neurology (2005), 65(11), 1826-1828

Basilar migraine (BM), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), and sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) are phenotypically similar subtypes of migraine with aura, differentiated only by motor symptoms, which ... [more ▼]

Basilar migraine (BM), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), and sporadic hemiplegic migraine (SHM) are phenotypically similar subtypes of migraine with aura, differentiated only by motor symptoms, which are absent in BM. Mutations in CACNA1A and ATP1A2 have been found in FHM. The authors detected a novel mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (R548H) in members of a family with BM, suggesting that BM and FHM may be allelic disorders. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProton MRS findings in migraine patients during visual stimulation
da Silva, H. M.; Magis, Delphine ULg; Balteau, Evelyne ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, December), 25(12), 1196

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOccipital nerve stimulation in refractory chronic cluster headache: a pilot study of efficacy and mechanisms in five patients
Magis, Delphine ULg; Allena, M.; Vandenheede, Michel et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, December), 25(12), 1197

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSuboccipital injection with a mixture of rapid- and long-acting steroids in cluster headache: A double-blind placebo-controlled study
Ambrosini, A.; Vandenheede, Michel; Gathot, P. et al

in Pain (2005), 118(1-2), 92-96

Oral steroids can interrupt bouts of cluster headache (CH) attacks, but recurrence is frequent and may lead to steroid-dependency. Suboccipital steroid injection may be an effective 'single shot ... [more ▼]

Oral steroids can interrupt bouts of cluster headache (CH) attacks, but recurrence is frequent and may lead to steroid-dependency. Suboccipital steroid injection may be an effective 'single shot' alternative, but no placebo-controlled trial is available. The aim of our study was to assess in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial the preventative effect on CH attacks of an ipsilateral steroid injection in the region of the greater occipital nerve. Sixteen episodic (ECH) and seven chronic (CCH) CH outpatients were included. ECH patients were in a new bout since no more than I week. After a one-week run-in period, patients were allocated by randomization to the placebo or verurn arms and received on the side of attacks a suboccipital injection of a mixture of long- and rapid-acting betamethasone (n=13; Verum-group) or physiological saline (n=10; Plac-group). Acute treatment was allowed at any time, additional preventative therapy if attacks persisted after I week. Three investigators performed the injections, while four others, blinded to group allocation, followed the patients. Follow-up visits were after I and 4 weeks, whereafter patients were followed routinely. Eleven Verum-group patients (3 CCH) (85%) became attack-free in the first week after the injection compared to none in the Plac-group (P=0.0001). Among them eight remained attack-free for 4 weeks (P=0.0026). Remission lasted between 4 and 26 months in five patients. A single suboccipital steroid injection completely suppresses attacks in more than 80% of CH patients. This effect is maintained for at least 4 weeks in the majority of them. (c) 2005 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOccipital nerve stimulation in refractory chronic cluster headache: a pilot study of efficacy and mechanisms in five patients.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Allena, Marta; Vandenheede, Michel et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2005, October), 25

Detailed reference viewed: 2 (0 ULg)