References of "Schoenen, Jean"
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See detailDistinct cerebral metabolic patterns related to high pain sensitivity in episodic or chronic migraine patients and healthy volunteers
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Lisicki Martinez, Marco ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg et al

in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience (2016, July)

Introduction Allodynia, i.e. pain evoked by a non-painful stimulus, is prevalent in chronic pain and in migraine where it augments with disease severity and chronicity [1]. Central sensitization is ... [more ▼]

Introduction Allodynia, i.e. pain evoked by a non-painful stimulus, is prevalent in chronic pain and in migraine where it augments with disease severity and chronicity [1]. Central sensitization is thought to be the culprit [2]. It is not known, however, which central areas are involved. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether brain metabolism in subjects that are more sensitive to pain is different between migraine patients and healthy controls. Subjects and methods Quantitative heat sensory testing on the forehead and 18FDG-PET were performed in 55 subjects: 20 healthy volunteers (HV, 21-59 years, 5M), 21 patients with episodic migraine in the interictal phase (MO, age range: 20-63 years, 5M) and 14 patients with chronic migraine (CM, age range: 22-62 years, 1M). The 3 cohorts were subdivided according to the median heat pain threshold into subgroups with low and high pain thresholds. PET results were compared between these subgroups in each cohort. Data analyses were restricted to areas of the pain/salience matrix. Results There was no significant difference in heat pain thresholds between HV (median: 43.7 °C), MO median: 44.2°C) and CM (median: 43.3°C) (p=0.64). In an SPM-ANOVA, a contrast modelling the potential gradual effect of increased differences in pain sensitivity in relation to disease severity showed significant metabolic changes in bilateral thalamus and midbrain (p < 0.001). Additional analyses revealed that hypometabolic areas in subgroups with a low heat pain threshold differed between HV (anterior cingulate and somatosensory cortices), MO (lower pons and somatosensory cortex) and CM (midbrain and thalamus) (Figure 1). Conclusion Overall migraine patients do not have reduced heat pain thresholds. However, hypometabolic areas related to high thermal pain sensitivity are strictly cortical in HV, but comprise the pons in episodic migraine and are restricted to midbrain and thalamus in chronic migraine. The distinct central correlates of heat pain sensitivity in migraine patients might therefore represent a biomarker of migraine and its chronification. Legend to figure Figure 1. Hypometabolic areas in low pain threshold subgroups in HV (green), MO (orange) and CM (red). p < 0.01 for display purpose. Résumé en Français: Titre: Métabolisme cérébral distinct en relation avec la sensibilité à la douleur entre sujets sains, migraine épisodique et migraine chronique. Les migraineux ont une sensibilité anormale à la douleur. Les mécanismes cérébraux en sont inconnus. Nous avons comparé le métabolisme cérébral chez des sujets sains et chez des migraineux épisodiques ou chroniques et correlé les résultats avec le seuil douloureux. Les aires cérébrales hypométaboliques liées à un seuil douloureux bas diffèrent entre groupes: régions corticales chez les sujets sains, aires corticales et sous-corticales dans la migraine épisodique, régions sous-corticales dans la migraine chronique .Le contrôle central de la douleur semble modifié distinctement dans les formes de migraine, ce qui pourrait en constituer un biomarqueur et avoir des implications thérapeutiques. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral metabolism before and after external trigeminal nerve stimulation in episodic migraine
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2016)

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See detailAnodal transcranial direct stimulation (tDCS) targeting the anterior cingulate gyrus for the preventive treatment of chronic cluster headache: a proof of concept trial.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Cosseddu, Anna et al

Poster (2016, April)

Background There is a need for better treatments in chronic cluster headache (CCH). In responders to percutaneous occipital nerve stimulation, the subgenual anterior cingulate gyrus (sACG) was found ... [more ▼]

Background There is a need for better treatments in chronic cluster headache (CCH). In responders to percutaneous occipital nerve stimulation, the subgenual anterior cingulate gyrus (sACG) was found hypermetabolic (Magis et al. 2011). We reasoned that activation of this area by transcranial neurostimulation could be effective in CCH. Aim To explore the preventive effect of anodal (i.e. activating) transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting the anterior cingulate gyrus in CCH patients. Method & subjects Difficult-to-treat CCH patients with a stable preventive drug regimen applied tDCS (2mA) interictally in 20-minute daily sessions for 4 weeks with the anode positioned over the forehead (FpZ), the cathode over the C7 spinous process. Therapeutic effects were monitored with paper diaries. Results Nineteen patients were enrolled up to now. In 13 patients who completed the trial, mean weekly attack frequency decreased by 38% after 4 weeks of daily stimulation (W-test: p = 0.002). The 50% responder rate was 54%. Patients (n=12) reported an improvement in headache impact, as shown by 5-point decrease in the mean HIT-6 score (from 67 to 62, p = 0.02). In 10 patients who were followed up after the treatment period, the benefit remained stable up to 4 weeks after the last stimulation. The first 3 enrolled patients had superficial skin burns under the adhesive cathode electrode. Sponge electrodes were therefore used in all subsequent patients without any adverse effect. Conclusion Anodal tDCS targeting the anterior cingulate gyrus seems promising for the preventive treatment of chronic cluster headache as suggested by this ongoing proof-of-concept trial. Use of adhesive electrodes is not recommended. [less ▲]

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See detailNon-invasive vagus nerve stimulation with the gammaCore® in healthy subjects: is there electrophysiological evidence for activation of vagal afferents ?
Schoenen, Jean ULg; NONIS, Romain ULg; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg et al

Poster (2016, April)

Abstract: Background Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) with the gammaCore® improves migraine and cluster headache. Animal experiments suggest that nVNS acts via stimulation of vagal afferents ... [more ▼]

Abstract: Background Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) with the gammaCore® improves migraine and cluster headache. Animal experiments suggest that nVNS acts via stimulation of vagal afferents, but proof in humans is lacking. Vagal somatosensory evoked potentials (vSEP) are identified after invasive VNS or transcutaneous stimulation of auricular vagal branches, but late components could be muscle artifacts. Objective To search in healthy volunteers for reliable vSEP during nVNS with the gammaCore® Methods In 12 healthy subjects (7males) evoked potentials were recorded at A1/A2 (ref Cz) and C3/C4 (ref F3/F4) during 2-minute stimulation over left/right cervical vagus nerve with the gammaCore® (25Hz, 6-24V) and during stimulation over the inner tragus with a monopolar stimulator (2Hz, 50 stimuli, mean intensity 8mA). Results We identified 3 reproducible peaks P1, N1, P2 in 10 patients on the side of the gammaCore® stimulation at mean latencies of 2.05ms, 5.20ms and 9.13ms. P1-N1 amplitude increased significantly (p<0.01) with increasing voltage from 0.04μV to 0.52μV (C3/C4) and from 0.13µV to 2.04μV (A1/A2) respectively at 10V and 30V. Inner tragus stimulation elicited P1, N1, P2 peaks with shorter mean latencies (2.21ms, 3.72ms, 5.71ms) and a mean P1-N1 amplitude (A1/A2) of 5.0µV. When the gammaCore® was placed over the sternocleidomastoid muscle, there were no reproducible evoked potentials. Conclusion Non-invasive transcutaneous stimulation of the cervical vagus nerve with the gammaCore® elicits evoked potentials similar to those found with implanted electrodes or stimulation of Arnold’s nerve in the outer ear. The gammaCore®-evoked potentials increase in amplitude with stimulation intensity and disappear when the stimulator is positioned over neck muscles, suggesting that they are not muscle artifacts. Their short latency is compatible with their generation at the level of the foramen jugulare. The therapeutic effects reported with the gammaCore® in primary headaches can thus be mediated by genuine activation of vagus nerve afferents. [less ▲]

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See detailNoninvasive neurostimulation methods for migraine therapy: The available evidence
SCHOENEN, Jean ULg; Baschi, Roberta; MAGIS, Delphine ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2016)

Abstract Background: Migraine is one of the most disabling neurological disorders. The current pharmacological armamentarium is not satisfying for a large proportion of patients because the responder rate ... [more ▼]

Abstract Background: Migraine is one of the most disabling neurological disorders. The current pharmacological armamentarium is not satisfying for a large proportion of patients because the responder rate does not exceed 50% on average and the most effective drugs often induce intolerable side effects. During recent years, noninvasive central and peripheral neuromodulation methods have been explored for migraine treatment. Overview: A review of the available evidence suggests that noninvasive neuromodulation techniques could be beneficial for migraine patients. The transcranial stimulation methods allow modulating selectively cortical activity and can thus be curtailed to the patient’s pathophysiological profile, while transcutaneous stimulation of pericranial nerves likely modulates central pain control centers. Occipital single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcutaneous supraorbital stimulation have the strongest evidence respectively for acute and preventive treatment. Transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive magnetic stimulation are promising in pilot studies, but large sham-controlled trials are not yet available. Conclusions: The noninvasive neurostimulation methods are promising for migraine treatment and devoid of serious adverse effects allowing their combination with drug therapies. Their application in clinical practice will depend on the industry’s capacity to develop portable and user-friendly devices, and on the scientists’ capacity to prove their efficacy in randomized sham-controlled trials. [less ▲]

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See detailInvasive occipital nerve stimulation for refractory chronic cluster headache: what evolution at long-term? Strengths and weaknesses of the method.
MAGIS, Delphine ULg; Gerard, Pascale; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Journal of Headache & Pain (2016)

BACKGROUND: Invasive Occipital Nerve Stimulation (iONS) is a costly technique which appears effective in drug-refractory chronic cluster headache (drCCH) management. Available data on long-term ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Invasive Occipital Nerve Stimulation (iONS) is a costly technique which appears effective in drug-refractory chronic cluster headache (drCCH) management. Available data on long-term effectiveness and safety of iONS in this indication are scarce, though they could be useful to neurologists and patients in daily practice. The purpose of this short report is to discuss the very long-term outcome of a drCCH cohort, including adverse events. FINDINGS: Previously, favourable results were obtained with iONS in 15 drCCH patients: 80 % were significantly improved and 60 % were pain free. We report here the very long-term follow-up (up to nine years) of 10 patients belonging to this cohort. Meanwhile 5 patients had to be definitively explanted because of device infection (3) or paresthesia intolerance (2). Four patients (40 %) evolved to an episodic form of CH. Six remained chronic but their attack frequency was decreased by 70 % on average. Intake of preventive drugs is still necessary in 80 % of patients. All patients needed at least one battery replacement. CONCLUSIONS: Up to nine years after implantation, iONS is still effective in most patients with drCCH. Concomitant preventive drugs remain often necessary. Forty percent of patients reverse to episodic CH, possibly by natural history. iONS is not a benign procedure but device-related complications appear similar to those reported with other invasive neurostimulators. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact model of spinal cord injury
Cantinieaux, Dorothée; Franzen, Rachelle ULg; Schoenen, Jean ULg

in Janowski, Miroslav (Ed.) Experimental Neurosurgery in Animal Models (2016)

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See detailSphenopalatine ganglion stimulation in neurovascular headaches
SCHOENEN, Jean ULg

in Progress in Neurological Surgery (2015), 29

Abstract The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the sphenopalatine ganglion in «nasal headaches» ... [more ▼]

Abstract The interest for the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in neurovascular headaches dates back to 1908 when Sluder presented his work on the role of the sphenopalatine ganglion in «nasal headaches» that are now part of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and cluster headache (ICHD-III beta). Since then various interventions with blocking or lesional properties have targeted the SPG (transnasal injection of lidocaine and other agents, alcohol or steroid injections, radiofrequency lesions or even ganglionectomy); sucess rates varied, but benefit was usually transient. Here we briefly review some anatomo-physiological characteristics of the SPG and hypotheses about its pathophysiological role in neurovascular headaches before describing recent therapeutic results obtained with electrical stimulation of the SPG. Based on results of a prospective randomized controlled study, SPG stimulation appears to be an effective treatment option for patients with chronic cluster headaches; efficacy data indicate that acute electrical stimulation of the SPG provided significant attack pain relief and in many cases pain freedom compared to sham stimulation. Moreover, in some patients SPG stimulation was associated with a significant and clinically meaningful reduction in cluster headache attack frequency; this preventive effect of SPG stimulation warrants further investigation. For migraine attacks, the outcome of the proof-of-concept study using a temporary electrode implanted in the pterygopalatine fossa was less encouraging – but an ongoing multi-center trial evaluates the efficacy of long-term SPG stimulation against sham stimulation for acute and preventive treatment in patients with frequent migraine. [less ▲]

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See detailCerebral FDG uptake changes with supraorbital transcutaneous electrical stimulation for episodic migraine prevention
D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Thibaut, Aurore ULg; Laureys, Steven ULg et al

Conference (2015, May)

Background: A recent multicentre RCT has shown that supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS) targeting branches of the ophtalmic nerve with the Cefaly® device is effective as a preventive therapy for ... [more ▼]

Background: A recent multicentre RCT has shown that supraorbital transcutaneous stimulation (STS) targeting branches of the ophtalmic nerve with the Cefaly® device is effective as a preventive therapy for migraine (Schoenen et al., Neurology 2013). However, the mechanisms of action in the central nervous system remain unknown. Here, we conducted voxel-based analyses of [18]FDG-PET to evaluate metabolic changes immediately after the first STS session and after 3 months of treatment in patients with migraine. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects participated in the experiment: 14 patients with episodic migraine (ICHD3 beta criteria) and 14 age-matched controls. Healthy volunteers underwent only one [18]FDG-PET scan whereas patients were scanned at baseline, directly after a first session of STS and after 3 months of daily treatment. Results: Compliant patients showed a significant decrease in the number of attacks (p = 0.03). When compared to controls, patients (n = 14) at baseline were hypometabolic in the fronto-temporal regions (p < 0.001), especially in the orbitofrontal (OFC) and perigenual anterior cingulate cortex. OFC hypometabolism was not correlated with medication intake. In compliant patients, daily STS for 3 months was followed by a normalization of the fronto-temporal hypometabolism (p< 0.001; OFC: pFWE<0.01). Conclusion: Our study suggests that the OFC is hypoactive in episodic migraine. STS with the Cefaly° device is able to normalize this hypoactivity. This indicates that STS exerts its beneficial effect via slow neuromodulatory mechanisms, as also previously shown for percutaneous occipital nerve stimulation in refractory cluster headache (Magis et al., BMC Neurology 2011). [less ▲]

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See detailOne-year Prevalence of Migraine Using a Validated Extended French Version of the ID MigraineTM: a Belgian Population-Based Study
Schoenen, Jean ULg; Streel, Sylvie ULg; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2015, May), 35(6), 155-156

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See detailCerebral responses and role of the prefrontal cortex in conditioned pain modulation: an fMRI study in healthy subjects
Bogdanov, Volodymyr; Vigano, Alessandro; Noirhomme, Quentin ULg et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2015)

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See detailTargeting pericranial nerve branches to treat migraine: Current approaches and perspectives.
Ambrosini, Armin; D'Alessio, Costantino; MAGIS, Delphine ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2015)

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See detailDiagnosis, pathophysiology and management of chronic migraine: a proposal of the Belgian Headache Society.
Paemeleire, K; Louis, P; MAGIS, Delphine ULg et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2015), 35(5), 437-442

This is a review of the pathophysiology of chronic migraine and of available therapies with a proposal for an algorithm of management.

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See detailHeadache during cryoballoon ablation for atrial Fibrillation
Pison, L; Peeters, P; Blaauw, Y et al

in Europace (2015), 17(6), 898-901

Objective Headache has been reported to occur during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). No study has systematically analyzed this phenomenon. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with ... [more ▼]

Objective Headache has been reported to occur during cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF). No study has systematically analyzed this phenomenon. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with symptomatic AF, underwent cryoballoon ablation without sedation. Headache was evaluated before, during and after the first cryoapplication in every pulmonary vein (PV) using a visual representation of a head for location of the headache, a numerical rating scale (NRS) for measuring pain intensity and the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ) for qualitative analysis of pain. The order in which the PVs were ablated, was randomized. Results Sixteen (80%) patients perceived mainly frontal headache during cryoablation. The overall NRS scores were significantly higher during (5.1±1.7), compared to before (2.7±1.4), and after (3.5±2.2) a cryoapplication (p<0.05). The NRS score was significantly higher during ablation of the first PV. The intensity of the perceived headache was not related to the temperature reached 150 s after initiation of a cryoapplication (p = 0,81). Of the MPQ, 3 sensory adjectives and 1 affective adjective averaged between score 1 and 2, representing mild to moderate severity of pain. Conclusions The majority of patients treated by balloon cryoablation, experienced headache during a cryoapplication. There was no correlation between the temperature reached during a cryoballoon freeze and the intensity of the headache. Cryoballoon ablation of the first PV, was significantly more painfull than the remaining PV [less ▲]

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See detailValidation of an extended French version of ID MigraineTM as a migraine-screening tool
Streel, Sylvie ULg; Donneau, Anne-Françoise ULg; Dardenne, Nadia ULg et al

in Cephalalgia : An International Journal of Headache (2015), 35(5), 437-442

Introduction: Migraine has a considerable social, economic, physical and emotional burden but remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. A specific migraine screening tool could help remove barriers to ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Migraine has a considerable social, economic, physical and emotional burden but remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. A specific migraine screening tool could help remove barriers to health care and be an attractive instrument for epidemiological studies. The objective of this work was to assess the validity of an extended French version of ID MigraineTM as a migraine-screening tool. Methods: Sixty-seven subjects from the NESCaV study (2010–2012) completed the migraine screen and were diagnosed by a neurologist specializing in headache medicine using the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition criteria (gold standard). Agreement between the two diagnoses was evaluated by Cohen kappa coefficient (k). Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of the migraine screen were calculated. Results: Migraine was diagnosed in 21 (31.3%) of the 67 subjects according to the screening tool and in 24 (35.8%) by the neurologist (k¼0.90). The prevalence of migraine was unrelated to age, gender, education and perception of financial resources. Sensitivity and specificity of the screen were 87.5% and 100%, respectively. The screen prevalence of migraine with aura was 10.4% (sensitivity and specificity: 83.3% and 96.7%, respectively). Conclusion: The extended French version of ID MigraineTM (ef-ID Migraine) is a validated tool to screen migraine in French-speaking countries. [less ▲]

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See detailCortical spreading depression decreases Fos expression in rat periaqueductal gray matter.
Borysovich Bogdanov, Volodymir; LOMBARD, Arnaud ULg; Multon, Sylvie ULg et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2015)

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See detailAnalysis and clinical correlates of 20 Hz photic driving on routine EEG in migraine.
Fogang, Y; Gérard, P; De Pasqua, V et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (2015), 115(1), 1-17

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