References of "Sandersen, Charlotte"
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See detailDevelopment of a pharmacological protocol of stress echocardiography in horses
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2008)

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See detailTetanus in the equine species: a retrospective study of 31 cases.
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

in Tijdschrift voor Diergeneeskunde (2008), 133(12), 512-7

BACKGROUND: Few studies exist about factors affecting the outcome of horses with tetanus. ANIMALS: 31 equids (30 horses and 1 donkey) with a clinical diagnosis of tetanus admitted to the Equine Clinic of ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Few studies exist about factors affecting the outcome of horses with tetanus. ANIMALS: 31 equids (30 horses and 1 donkey) with a clinical diagnosis of tetanus admitted to the Equine Clinic of the University of Liege between 1991 and 2006. The cases were divided into two groups according to the outcome (survivors and non-survivors). METHODS: The clinical data of survivors and non-survivors were compared using an ANOVA (continuous data) or a Fisher's test (discrete data). RESULTS: The survival rate was 32%. Most animals were 5 years or younger, and none had been appropriately vaccinated. The non-survivors were significantly younger than the survivors. The development of dyspnoea, recumbency, and the combination of dysphagia, dyspnoea, and recumbency was observed significantly more in the non-survivors than in the survivors. The timing of tetanus antitoxin administration (either immediately after the onset of suggestive signs or after a delay) was not different between the two groups. The time between the occurrence of a wound and the first signs ranged from 2 days to 2 months and was not significantly different between groups. All non-survivors died within 8 days of the first signs. CONCLUSIONS & CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: This study suggests that young animals are affected more often and more severely by tetanus than older animals. Dyspnoea, recumbency, and the combination of dysphagia, dyspnoea, and recumbency can be considered as indicators of a poor prognosis in equids suffering from tetanus. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of stress level in horses (Equus caballus): behavioural and physiological measurements in hospital.
Peeters, Marie ULg; Péters, F.; Sulon, J. et al

Conference (2008)

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See detailThe use of radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy in the treatment of urethral urolithiasis in the horse: a preliminary study.
Verwilghen, Denis ULg; Ponthier, Jérôme ULg; Van Galen, Gaby ULg et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2008), 22(6), 1449-51

BACKGROUND: Radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is widely used in equine practice for the treatment of orthopedic problems. However, its original use as a lithotripsy device in human and canine ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) is widely used in equine practice for the treatment of orthopedic problems. However, its original use as a lithotripsy device in human and canine urology led us to postulate that it could be used as an alternative to the surgical treatment of urethral calculi in horses. HYPOTHESIS: Radial ESWT can easily and safely fragment calculi in the distal urethra of the horse. ANIMALS: Two postmortem cases and 1 live case of obstructive urinary disease admitted at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital of Liege. METHODS: A radial shockwave device was directly applied to the urethra in an attempt to fragment calculi. An ex vivo trial was performed on the same retrieved calculi to investigate pressure settings in order to obtain complete fragmentation of the calculus. RESULTS: In all cases, radial ESWT was able to fragment the calculus partially, enabling retrieval of the remaining fragments via the urethra. Much higher pressure settings than those used for in vivo partial fragmentation were necessary to obtain complete destruction of the calculi ex vivo. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: This brief report suggests the use of radial ESWT as a safe and useful alternative to more invasive surgical management of urethral calculi in horses. [less ▲]

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See detailDetermination of lidocaine and its two N-desethylated metabolites in dog and horse plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry
Maes, A.; Weiland, L.; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

in Journal of Chromatography. B : Analytical Technologies in the Biomedical & Life Sciences (2007), 852(1-2), 180-187

A sensitive method for the quantification of lidocaine and its metabolites, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and glycinexylidide (GX), in animal plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography combined ... [more ▼]

A sensitive method for the quantification of lidocaine and its metabolites, monoethylglycinexylidide (MEGX) and glycinexylidide (GX), in animal plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is described. The sample preparation includes a liquid-liquid extraction with methyl tert-butylmethyl ether after addition of 2 M sodium hydroxide. Ethyl methylglycinexylidide (EMGX) is used as an internal standard. For chromatographic separation, an ODS Hypersil column was used. Isocratic elution was achieved with 0.0 1 M ammonium acetate and acetonitrile as mobile phases. Good linearity was observed in the range of 2.5-1000 ng ml(-1) for lidocame in both dog and horse plasma. For MEGX, linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 5-1000 ng ml(-1) and 20-1000 ng ml(-1) for dog and horse plasma, respectively. In dog and horse plasma good linearity was observed in the range of 200-1500 ng ml(-1) for GX. The limit of quantification (LOQ) in dog plasma for lidocaine, MEGX and GX was set at 2.5 ng ml(-1), 20 ng ml(-1) and 200 ng ml(-1), respectively. For horse plasma a limit of quantification of 2.5 ng ml(-1), 5 ng ml(-1) and 200 ng ml(-1) was achieved for lidocaine, MEGX and GX, respectively. In dog plasma, the limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 0.8 ng ml(-1), 2.3 ng ml(-1) and 55 ng ml(-1) for lidocaine, MEGX and GX, respectively. In horse plasma the LOD's found for lidocame, MEGX and GX, were 1.1 ng ml(-1), 0.5 ng ml(-1) and 13 ng ml(-1), respectively. The method was shown to be of use in pharmacokinetic studies after application of a transdermal patch in dogs and after an intravenous infusion in horses. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe composition of the inflammatory infiltrate in 3 cases of polyneuritis equi
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg et al

in In Proccedings of the Second congress of the European College od Equine Internal Medicine (ECEIM) (2007, February 02)

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See detailParturition Induction in the mare. Why and when? Case Report
Ponthier, Jérôme ULg; Salciccia, Alexandra ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

Conference (2007, January)

INTRODUCTION Some conditions require induction of parturition: colic, severe hyperlipemia, prepubian tendon rupture, premature placental separation, hydroallantoïd, and foetal distress2,4,5. Prolonged ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION Some conditions require induction of parturition: colic, severe hyperlipemia, prepubian tendon rupture, premature placental separation, hydroallantoïd, and foetal distress2,4,5. Prolonged gestation is not a good indication1,4. Protocols using oxytocin, prostaglandins or corticosteroids can induce parturition2,3,4,5. Most induction protocols use low doses of oxytocin2,3,5. OBJECTIVE On the basis of a clinical case, this poster will discuss the indications, the methods and the risks of parturition induction in the mare. CLINICAL CASE A pony mare at day 310 of pregnancy is presented for colic with poor prognosis. The foetal parameters are good and the cervix begins to open. There is no milk in the udder. The decision to save the foal is taken and parturition is induced by one oxytocin bolus (20 I.U./IV) followed by an oxytocin infusion (100 I.U. in 1000ml saline). After assisted foaling, the foal rises and sucks commercial colostrum within 30 minutes. Soon, the foal becomes depressed and, despite treatment with commercial plasma, tube feeding and antibiotics, dies at day 2. DISCUSSION This case required immediate induction of foaling, which was achieved by administration of high doses of oxytocin. Commonly, high doses of oxytocin induce dystocia because the foal has no time to move to correct (dorso-sacral) presentation1,2,5. The risks for the foal include absence of colostrum and foetal immaturity1,2,3,4,5. Even after day 300, the prognosis is poor1,2,3,4. A good prognostic indicator of the foal’s maturity (lung, and other systems) is the electrolytes concentration in the mother’s milk2,4. These protocols should be used when foetal maturity is ascertained or as last resort1,2,3,4. CONCLUSIONS Foaling induction is risky for dystocia and foal outcome. It should be reserved to cases where foal’s maturity can be assessed. [less ▲]

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See detailLe syndrome Piro-like chez le cheval
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Pittel, PH; Amory, Hélène ULg

in Proceedins of the 24th Annual Congress of the Belgian Equine Practitioners Society (BEPS) (2007)

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See detailDiagnostic differentiel du syndrome "piro-like" chez les équidés
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg

in Bulletin des Journées Nationales des GTV (2007)

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See detailApproche cliniques de la fièvre inconnue chez le cheval
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg

in Bulletin des journées nationales des GTV (2007)

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See detailTetanus in the horse: a review of 31 cases
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Delguste, Catherine ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 45th Annual Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2006, September 14)

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See detailStress echocardiography in horses - a review
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Amory, Hélène ULg

in Pferdeheilkunde (2006)

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See detailA case of periarticular abcess and suppurative arthritis of the atlanto-occipital joint
Van Galen, Gaby ULg; Lopez, Diego; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2006, August)

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See detailFully automated heart rate variability assessment in dairy cows
Janda, Jozef; Guyot, Hugues ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

in Acta Physiologica (2006, May), 187(Suppl 651), -16

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See detailEquine Piroplasmosis in Belgium: a retrospective study.
Delguste, Catherine ULg; Mantran, A.; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg et al

Poster (2006, January)

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See detailExercise and pharmacological stress echocardiography in healthy horses
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Equine Veterinary Journal. Supplement (2006), 37

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Stress echocardiography could be a useful diagnostic test in horses suspected to suffer from exercise-induced myocardial dysfunction as a cause of exercise intolerance ... [more ▼]

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Stress echocardiography could be a useful diagnostic test in horses suspected to suffer from exercise-induced myocardial dysfunction as a cause of exercise intolerance. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treadmill exercise and pharmacological stress test on left ventricular echocardiographic parameters. METHODS: Echocardiography was performed in 2 groups of 5 healthy horses, either immediately after a near-maximal treadmill exercise (Group EXE) or during a pharmacological challenge (Group DOB) consisting of 35 microg/kg atropine, followed by incremental dobutamine infusion rates of 2-6 microg/kg bwt/min for 5 min duration each, which led to a cumulative dobutamine dose of 100 microg/kg. Left ventricular M-mode parameters were compared at rest and at heart rates of 80, 100, 110, 120 130, and 140 beats/min, within each group. RESULTS: In 2 horses of Group EXE, echocardiographic measurements were impossible at 140 and 130 beats/min, as their heart rates dropped too fast in the immediate post exercise period. In the remaining 3 horses image quality was not always satisfactory at heart rates of 130 and 140 beats/min. Systolic left ventricular parameters and fractional shortening measured at 130 and 140 beats/min were significantly different from values obtained at lower heart rates. Horses in Group DOB reached expected heart rates of 80 and 100 beats/min, after the administration of atropine and during a dobutamine infusion rate of 2 microg/kg bwt/min, respectively. Heart rates targets of 110, 120, 130, and 140 beats/min were reached at mean (+/- s.d.) dobutamine infusion rates of 2.8 +/- 0.4, 3.2 +/- 0.4, 4.0 +/- 0.7, 5 +/- 0.7 microg/kg bwt/min, respectively. Systolic left ventricular parameters and fractional shortening at heart rates of 110, 120, 130, and 140 beats/min, were significantly different from values obtained at lower heart rates. CONCLUSION: The pharmacological stress test induced changes in ventricular dimensions at heart rates of 80 to 140 beats/min. Using this test, high quality images can easily be obtained at heart rates of 140 beats/min. Conversely, in post exercise echocardiography, obtaining good quality images at heart rates of 130 and 140 beats/min is difficult, which limits use of the technique in routine clinical settings. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: Further studies should demonstrate the potential of pharmacological stress test as a diagnostic tool in horses suffering from exercise-induced myocardial dysfunction. [less ▲]

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See detailEquine oesophageal obstruction : a retrospective study on 143 cases
Seguin, A; Peters, F; Lopez, D et al

in Proceedings of the 45th Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2006)

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See detailCardiac pumping reserve measured in healthy horses using a dobutamine stress test
Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Art, Tatiana ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 45th Congress of the British Equine Veterinary Association (2006)

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