References of "Sandersen, Charlotte"
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See detailComparison of Various Indices of Energy Metabolism in Recumbent and Healthy Dairy Cows
Guyot, Hugues ULg; Detilleux, Johann ULg; Lebreton, Pascal et al

in PLoS ONE (2017), 12(1), 1-11

BACKGROUND: Downer cow syndrome (DCS) is often diagnosed in dairy cattle during the early post-partum period. The etiology of this condition is not completely understood, as it can be related to the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Downer cow syndrome (DCS) is often diagnosed in dairy cattle during the early post-partum period. The etiology of this condition is not completely understood, as it can be related to the energetic or electrolyte metabolism, as well as to infectious diseases or to trauma. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to compare energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity indices and various biochemical parameters between recumbent and healthy dairy cows. ANIMALS: A prospective study has been undertaken on 361 recumbent and 80 healthy Holstein cows. METHODS: Plasmatic glucose, insulin, non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) were assayed in all cows in order to calculate the insulin sensitivity indices but also minerals (Calcium, Phosphorous and Magnesium), thyroxin and creatine kinase. Body Condition Scores (BCS) was assessed. RESULTS: Significant differences in NEFA, and the glucose and insulin sensitivity indices ("Homeostasis Model Assessment" HOMA, "Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index" RQUICKI, RQUICKI-BHB) were observed between healthy and recumbent cows in the early post-parturient period indicating disturbances of glucose and insulin homeostasis in the recumbent cows. In the same manner, mineral concentrations were significantly different between healthy and recumbent cows. Glucose, insulin NEFA, and HOMA, were different between early post-partum downer cows and the DCS-affected cows later in lactation. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Results indicate disturbances in energy homeostasis in DCS-affected dairy cows. Further research should determine a prognostic value of the indices in cows suffering from recumbency of metabolic origin [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of emergence times and quality between isoflurane and sevoflurane in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) undergoing neurosurgical procedure
Bertrand, Henri ULg; Springer, Svenja; Burnside, Wesley et al

in Laboratory Animals (2017)

Volatile agents for anaesthesia are widely used for anaesthetizing laboratory primates, and isoflurane is one of the most frequently used agents. Sevoflurane has been shown to offer a more rapid recovery ... [more ▼]

Volatile agents for anaesthesia are widely used for anaesthetizing laboratory primates, and isoflurane is one of the most frequently used agents. Sevoflurane has been shown to offer a more rapid recovery than iso- flurane in a number of species, but no comparisons have been made in non-human primates. This study compared the recovery characteristics of isoflurane and sevoflurane in rhesus macaques undergoing experi- mental neurosurgery. Twelve primates (7 males and 5 females) were randomly allocated to the treatment groups. They were sedated with ketamine (10 mg/kg) and anaesthesia was induced with propofol (usually 8 mg/kg intravenously [IV]). Anaesthesia was maintained with either sevoflurane (SEVO) (2.2 0.4%) or iso- flurane (ISO) (1.2 0.2%) and alfentanil (0.2–0.5 mg/kg/min IV) for 332–592 min. Animals were mechanically ventilated. Meloxicam (0.3mg/kg) and methylprednisolone infusion (5.4mg/kg/h) were also administered. Time to extubation after cessation of anaesthesia was significantly shorter with sevoflurane (ISO: 7.0 1.8 min; SEVO: 3.6 1.5; *P 1⁄4 0.005) as was the time to the animal sitting unaided (ISO: 15.7 8.2 min; SEVO: 7.1 1.7min; *P1⁄40.004). No significant difference in the quality of recovery following isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia was found. In conclusion, isoflurane and sevoflurane are both suitable volatile agents for the maintenance of general anaesthesia in rhesus macaques undergoing experimental neurosur- gical procedures. The two volatile agents presented a similar emergence quality profile, however sevoflurane anaesthesia was associated with a faster recovery, offering the possibility of conducting earlier post-operative neurological assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailComparison of clinical effects of epidural levobupivacaine morphine versus bupivacaine morphine in dogs undergoing elective pelvic limb surgery
Cerasoli, Ilaria; Tutunaru, Alexandru-Cosmin ULg; Cenani, Alessia et al

in Veterinary Anaesthesia & Analgesia (2017)

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See detailNeuromuscular blockade as part of an anaesthetic protocol for cataract surgery in an alpaca
Tutunaru, Alexandru-Cosmin ULg; Storms, Goedele ULg; Monclin, Sébastien ULg et al

in Journal of Camelid Science (2016), 9

A six-month-old alpaca was presented to the veterinary teaching hospital of the University of Liège (Belgium) with a bilateral cataract. A decision was made to perform bilateral cataract surgery after an ... [more ▼]

A six-month-old alpaca was presented to the veterinary teaching hospital of the University of Liège (Belgium) with a bilateral cataract. A decision was made to perform bilateral cataract surgery after an ocular ultrasound and electroretinogram were performed to assess the posterior segment and retinal function, respectively. As a premedication, the alpaca received xylazine, butorphanol and midazolam intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced subsequently with ketamine and midazolam intravenously and maintained with isoflurane on oxygen/air mixture. The alpaca was mechanically ventilated during surgery. Neuromuscular blockade was induced and maintained with cis-atracurium intravenously. The dose of cis-atracurium was permanently adapted using a peripheral nerve stimulator. This case report brings new knowledge regarding the use and dosage of cis-atracurium in alpacas. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological Responses to training and competition in 1 to 4 star eventing horses
Kirsch, Katharina ULg; Düe, M.; Holzhausen, H. et al

Poster (2016, October 21)

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See detailReported post-operative analgesic administration to non-human primates: 2010 - 2015
Bertrand, Henri ULg; Flecknell, Paul; Brady, James et al

Poster (2016, October 21)

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See detailComputed tomography-guided injection of muscle-derived mesenchimal stem cells in the intervertebral disc of dogs affected by natural disc degeneration: clinical safety and intervertebral disc imaging assessment
Liotta, Annalisa Pia ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Ceusters, Justine ULg et al

Poster (2016, September 01)

Introduction/Purpose: Pre-clinical randomized controlled animal trials have been conducted to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) transplantation on intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration ... [more ▼]

Introduction/Purpose: Pre-clinical randomized controlled animal trials have been conducted to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) transplantation on intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. According to their histological results and to imaging assessment of the IVD, intradiscal injection of MSCs is effective, arresting or slowing IVDD process, and is associated with a low complication rate. Few of these studies have been conducted on canine artificially degenerated IVD, using bone marrow or adipose-derived MSCs. Therefore a systematic study on naturally degenerated IVD using MSCs obtained from autologous muscular tissue in dogs is still lacking. The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinical effects of intradiscal injection of muscle-derived MSCs and its effects on imaging features of the intervertebral disc. Methods: Eight experimental dogs were randomly included with the approval of the University’s Animal Care and Use Committee. The final inclusion criteria were the presence of naturally degenerated lumbosacral IVD detected on low-field magnetic resonance (MRI) images and the obtaining of 3 x 106 autologous muscle-derived MSCs. A computed tomography (CT) and MRI examination was performed before and 2 months after the procedure and 13 imaging parameters were assessed. Mesenchymal stem cells diluted in 0,2 ml of FRS Hypothermosol were injected in the lumbosacral IVD under CT-guidance. Clinical examinations were performed regularly during 1 month after the procedure. Results: Six dogs met the inclusion criteria. The remaining 2 dogs did not undergo intradiscal injections, but were used as control group. No major or minor complications were reported during the procedure. No abnormalities were noticed during the clinical examinations. No statistically significant variations of IVD imaging features were noticed before and after the injections. Discussion/Conclusions: Intradiscal injection of muscle-derived MSCs is clinically safe and it is not associated with any progression of the IVD degeneration, detected by CT or low-field MRI imaging. Further studies are needed to assess its efficacy as treatment for the canine natural IVD degeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial function and aerobic capacity assessed by high resolution respirometry in Thoroughbred horses
Serteyn, Didier ULg; Ceusters, Justine ULg; Nonnenmacher et al

in Comparative Exercise Physiology (2016), 12(2), 67-73

During the initial stages of training of young Thoroughbred horses, low intensity exercise is employed to increase aerobic capacity. High Resolution Respirometry (HRR) allows the determination of aerobic ... [more ▼]

During the initial stages of training of young Thoroughbred horses, low intensity exercise is employed to increase aerobic capacity. High Resolution Respirometry (HRR) allows the determination of aerobic capacities in small samples of permeabilised muscle fibres. The aim of the study was to measure the mitochondrial function by HRR in Thoroughbred horses, to compare these values to Warmblood horses and to evaluate the effect of a 10-weeks training period. The mitochondrial function was measured by HRR using different substrate-uncoupler protocols (SUIT 1 and 2) in muscle microbiopsies from two groups of untrained horses: 17 Warmblood and 8 Thoroughbred and in the group of 8 Thoroughbred horses before and after a 10-week training period. The SUIT1 protocol employed to compare the two groups of horses showed that in Thoroughbred horses, the mean values for oxygen flux expressed as tissue mass-specific respiration were significantly higher for complex I (CI)Glutamate+Malate, CI + complex II, and maximum electron transport capacities (ETSmax) than the mean values measured in Warmblood horses. The SUIT 1 and SUIT 2 protocols revealed large differences among Thoroughbred horses before and after training. The SUIT 2 protocols showed a significant difference for the complex I activity before and after training but only when the oxygen flux was expressed as percentage of ETSmax. This study shows the interest of HRR in equine sport medicine and exercise physiology, but shows that the technique requires further refinement. Indeed significant differences have been shown between the Thoroughbred and the Warmblood horses highlighting the need to have baseline data for each breed. The Thoroughbred horses had globally a high oxidative phosphorylation capacity with an increase of CI activity induced by an aerobic training program. [less ▲]

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See detailPhysiological response to training and competition in 1-star to 4-star eventing horses
KIRSCH, Katharina; Düe, Michael; Holzhausen, Hermann et al

Poster (2016, June)

Abstract 034 – Physiological response to training and competition in 1-star to 4-star eventing horses – Post Review Authors’ names and affiliations Author 1: Katharina Kirsch* (German Olympic Committee ... [more ▼]

Abstract 034 – Physiological response to training and competition in 1-star to 4-star eventing horses – Post Review Authors’ names and affiliations Author 1: Katharina Kirsch* (German Olympic Committee for Equestrian Sports, Germany and PhD Student, University of Liège, Belgium) Author 2: Michael Düe (German Equestrian Federation, Germany) Author 3: Hermann Holzhausen (Olympic Support Center Westphalia – Warendorf, Germany) Author 4: Stephanie Horstmann (German Olympic Committee for Equestrian Sports, Germany) Author 5: Markus Scharmann (German Equestrian Federation, Germany) Author 6: Charlotte Sandersen (University of Liège, Belgium) *Address of the presenting author: Katharina Kirsch, Freiherr-von-Langen-Str. 15, 48231 Warendorf, GERMANY E-mail of the presenting author: kkirsch@fn-dokr.de Abstract Physiological response to training and competition in 1-star to 4-star eventing horses To prepare horses for the requirements of international eventing competitions and simultaneously maintain their health and welfare, appropriate training is mandatory. Specific training and competition management necessitates information about exercise intensities and fitness, which are usually assessed by standardized exercise tests. Our purpose was to identify parameters whose measurement can be largely integrated in the daily training and competition routine and which provide information on fitness and adequacy of applied training. Further, we evaluated training and competition intensities of eventing horses, based on data generated by a proportionally large group of horses over several years. Data of 187 horses from 1-star to 4-star level over a time period of six years were collected during 410 training sessions and 916 Cross Country rides, including measurement of covered distance and speed (GPS, Fidelak EquiPILOT), continuously recording of heart rate (HR) (Polar T52H) and determination of blood lactate concentrations (BLC) (Dr. Lange photometer). Characteristics of the track, altitude profile, ambient temperature and humidity were recorded at each session. The results of the one-way ANOVA indicated a significant effect of competition level on HR (F3,373=23.29; p<0.001) and BLC (F3,763=46.12; p<0.001). Under competition conditions, HR and BLC increased from 1-star to 3-star level (1-star: HR=194±9 bpm, BLC=7.7±5.6 mmol/l; 2-star: HR=198±9 bpm, BLC=9.6±6.2 mmol/l; 3-star: HR=205±10, BLC=15.6±9.8 mmol/l; 4-star: HR=207±2 bpm, BLC=12.4±9.3 mmol/l), while under training conditions, they decreased with increasing competition level (1-star: HR=184±29 bpm; BLC=18.9±11.1 mmol/l; 2-star: HR=182±19 bpm; BLC=12.1±9.0; 3-star: HR=174±25 bpm; BLC=6.9±7.1 mmol/l; 4-star: HR=161±24 bpm, BLC=4.0±5.6 mmol/l). On 1-/2-star level, BLCs after training exceeded those after competition. Reverse applied for 3-/4-star level. On 3-star level, the percentage of HRs above 200 bpm during Cross Country was considerably greater than on lower levels (1-star: 33%; 2-star: 54%; 3-star: 94%). The competition format (CCI/CIC) had no significant effect on the progress of HR. The altitude profile however, had a significant effect on HR (F1,201=26.72, p<0.001) and BLC (F1,89=25.56; p<0.001). Evaluation of physiological response to training and competition through implementation of measurement technology allows an assessment of the different impacts on exercise intensities and should be more commonly used to assess appropriateness of training and competition management in eventing horses. It should be further investigated if the detected discrepancies in the response to training and competition between levels are a result of different fitness ore varying training strategies. LP To meet the demands of international Eventing competitions, a systematic training of horses is necessary. Close monitoring of physiological response to exercise during training and competition can help to improve training. Keywords Exercise physiology; training; eventing; heart rate; lactate. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary assessment of midazolam, fentanyl and fluanisone combination for the sedation of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)
Bertrand, Henri ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; flecknell, Paul

in Laboratory Animals (2016)

This study was undertaken to assess the suitability of fentanyl/fluanisone (‘Hypnorm’, VetaPharma; 0.315 mg/mL of fentanyl citrate and 10 mg/mL of fluanisone) alone or combined with midazolam in rhesus ... [more ▼]

This study was undertaken to assess the suitability of fentanyl/fluanisone (‘Hypnorm’, VetaPharma; 0.315 mg/mL of fentanyl citrate and 10 mg/mL of fluanisone) alone or combined with midazolam in rhesus macaques. Fifteen rhesus macaques requiring sedation for veterinary procedures received an intramuscular (IM) dose range of Hypnorm from 0.01 mL/kg to 0.3 mL/kg either alone or combined with 0.5 mg/kg of mid- azolam. To reverse the sedation, flumazenil in combination with either naloxone, buprenorphine or butor- phanol was administered intravenously (IV) or IM. Rhesus macaques were successfully sedated with 0.1 mL/kg of Hypnorm and 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam, and sedation was partially reversed by the administration of flumazenil and either naloxone or buprenorphine. However the primates remained slightly sedated and were only released into their home cage several hours post recovery. Butorphanol failed to induce recovery and caused marked respiratory depression. The neuroleptanalgesic combination, Hypnorm and midazolam, effectively immobilized rhesus macaques and was reversible with a combination of flumazenil and either naloxone or buprenorphine. [less ▲]

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See detailEfficacy of Intrathecal Morphine in a Model of Surgical Pain in Rats
Thomas, Aurélie ULg; Miller, Amy; Roughan, Johnny et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11(10),

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See detailClinical effects of computed tomography-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs.
Liotta, Annalisa Pia ULg; Girod, Maud ULg; Peeters, Dominique ULg et al

in American Journal of Veterinary Research (2016), 77(10), 1132-9

OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (5 dogs/group) and received a single CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, or translaminar epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (0.1 mg/kg). Contrast medium was injected prior to injection of methylprednisolone to verify needle placement. Neurologic examinations were performed 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after the injection. In dogs with neurologic abnormalities, a final neurologic examination was performed 24 days after the procedure. RESULTS Methylprednisolone injections were successfully performed in 14 of the 15 dogs. In 1 dog, vascular puncture occurred, and the methylprednisolone injection was not performed. No major or minor complications were identified during or immediately after the procedure, other than mild transient hyperthermia. During follow-up neurologic examinations, no motor, sensory, or postural deficits were identified, other than mild alterations in the patellar, withdrawal, cranial tibial, and perineal reflexes in some dogs. Overall, altered reflexes were observed in 11 of the 14 dogs, during 27 of 65 neurologic examinations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate were associated with few complications in healthy dogs. However, the number of dogs evaluated was small, and additional studies are needed to assess clinical efficacy and safety of these procedures. [less ▲]

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See detailTECHNIQUE, DIFFICULTY, AND ACCURACY OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-GUIDED TRANSLAMINAR AND TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBOSACRAL EPIDURAL AND INTRAARTICULAR LUMBAR FACET JOINT INJECTIONS IN DOGS.
Liotta, Annalisa Pia ULg; Sandersen, Charlotte ULg; Couvreur, Thierry et al

in Veterinary radiology & ultrasound : the official journal of the American College of Veterinary Radiology and the International Veterinary Radiology Association (2016), 57(2), 191-8

In human medicine, spinal pain and radiculopathy are commonly managed by computed tomography (CT)-guided facet joint injections and by transforaminal or translaminar epidural injections. In dogs, CT ... [more ▼]

In human medicine, spinal pain and radiculopathy are commonly managed by computed tomography (CT)-guided facet joint injections and by transforaminal or translaminar epidural injections. In dogs, CT-guided lumbosacral epidural or lumbar facet joint injections have not been described. The aim of this experimental, ex vivo, feasibility study was to develop techniques and to assess their difficulty and accuracy. Two canine cadavers were used to establish the techniques and eight cadavers to assess difficulty and accuracy. Contrast medium was injected and a CT scan was performed after each injection. Accuracy was assessed according to epidural or joint space contrast opacification. Difficulty was classified as easy, moderately difficult, or difficult, based on the number of CT scans needed to guide insertion of the needle. A total of six translaminar and five transforaminal epidural and 53 joint injections were performed. Translaminar injections had a high success rate (100%), were highly accurate (75%), and easy to perform (100%). Transforaminal injections had an moderately high success rate (75%), were accurate (75%), and moderately difficult to perform (100%). Success rate of facet joint injections was 62% and was higher for larger facet joints, such as L7-S1. Accuracy of facet joint injections ranged from accurate (37-62%) to highly accurate (25%) depending on the volume injected. In 77% of cases, injections were moderately difficult to perform. Possible complications of epidural and facet joint injections were subarachnoid and vertebral venous plexus puncture and periarticular spread, respectively. Further studies are suggested to evaluate in vivo feasibility and safety of these techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailImpact of feeding and housing on the development ofosteochondrosis in foals—A longitudinal study
Mendoza García, Luis ULg; Lejeune, Jean-Philippe ULg; Caudron, Isabelle ULg et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2016), 127

Osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) is a developmental orthopedic disease caused by a failure of the endochondral ossification in epiphyseal plates and joint cartilage. This trouble may induce the presence of ... [more ▼]

Osteochondrosis dissecans (OCD) is a developmental orthopedic disease caused by a failure of the endochondral ossification in epiphyseal plates and joint cartilage. This trouble may induce the presence of osteochondral fragments in the articulation, fissures or subchondral bone cysts in the growth cartilage. Occurrence of osteochondrosis is influenced by a complex interaction of different factors. Among these, the effect of the housing and the feeding of the foals during their first months of life, have been described as risk factors for the development of osteochondrosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of OCD lesions with a longitudinal study in 204 young foals from 6 to 18 months in comparison to the type of feeding and the type of housing conditions. These factors and OCD status were obtained by a questionnaire and radiological examination, respectively. This allowed dividing the foals into four groups according to the initial OCD status and the evolution of the condition. As a result, we found that foals fed with concentrates show a higher probability to develop OCD lesions (p = 0.06), while foals not receiving concentrates, had a higher probability to heal from existing OCD lesions (p = 0.001). This study supports the theory that management factors such as feeding or housing may influence the evolution of the osteochondrosis disease. [less ▲]

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