References of "Saegerman, Claude"
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See detailHydroxymethylfurfural: a possible emergent cause of honey bee mortality?
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; de Graaf, DC et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2013), 61(49), 11865-11870

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See detailSpatial distribution and risks factors of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin based meat inspection records
Goussanou, S. E.; Kpodekon, T. M.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology (2013), 4(8), 188-196

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution ... [more ▼]

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution. In this study, spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin was performed. By using the number of partial organ seizures at meat inspection, the study has revealed high risks of porcine cysticercosis in administrative districts of Aplahoue, Dogbo, Klouekanme and Lokossa. The proportion of seizures ranged from 0.06% for neck muscles to 0.69% for tongues. Spatial analysis of carcass seizure frequencies revealed Akpro Misserete, Avrankou, Dangbo, Porto-Novo, Ifangni and Aguegues as the most likely clusters (P<0.001) for porcine cysticercosis distribution. The risk factor found to be associated with the porcine distribution was the Taenia solium cysticerci positive testing using lingual examination by butchers and retailers. Catching of pig within the Zou and Mono department and pigs directly purchased by the butcher were found protective factors for distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and seroprevalence to Theileria parva in cattle raised in North Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Kalume, Moise Kasereka; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Mbahikyavolo, Daniel Kambale et al

in Parasitology research (2013), 112(2), 789-97

This study aimed to identify tick species and to determine their relationship with the Theileria parva seroprevalence in cattle raised under an extensive farming system in North Kivu Province, Democratic ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to identify tick species and to determine their relationship with the Theileria parva seroprevalence in cattle raised under an extensive farming system in North Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo in two agro-ecological zones namely medium (1,000-1,850 m) and high (>1,850 m) altitude. Among the 3,215 ticks collected on 482 animals, from February to April 2009, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (64.26 %), the main vector of T. parva, was the most abundant species followed by Rhipicephalus decoloratus (35.49 %) and Amblyomma variegatum (0.25 %). The mean burden of R. appendiculatus tick per infested animal appeared significantly higher at medium (6.5 +/- 0.22 ticks) than at high (0.07 +/- 0.3 ticks) altitude (P < 0.05). However, an indirect fluorescent antibody test carried out on 450 blood samples revealed a global T. parva seroprevalence of 43 % (95 % CI: 38-47) which was not significantly (P > 0.05) different between medium (48.4 %; 95 % CI: 38-49) and high (41.9 %; 95 % CI: 35-49) altitude. These relatively low seroprevalences suggest that there is a state of endemicity to T. parva infection in the study area. The presence of the tick vector on animals was associated with an increased risk of being seropositive to T. parva infection (odds ratio = 2.04; 95 % CI: 1.8-2.3; P < 0.001). The results suggest the need for a longitudinal study to investigate the seasonal dynamics of tick species and T. parva infection. The rate of tick infection should also be evaluated in order to determine the intensity of T. parva transmission to cattle. [less ▲]

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See detailTicks and associated pathogens collected from dogs and cats in Belgium.
Claerebout, edwin; Losson, Bertrand ULg; cochez, christel et al

in Parasites & Vectors (2013), 6(183),

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See detailProposed terms and concepts for describing and evaluating animal-health surveillance systems
Hoinville, LJ; Alban, L; Drewe, JA et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2013), 112

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See detailBrucellosis in terrestrial wildlife
Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Revue scientifique et technique - Office international des épizooties (2013)

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See detailUnexpected Brucella suis Biovar 2 Infection in a Dairy Cow, Belgium
Fretin, D; Mori, M; Czaplicki, G et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2013), 19(12), 2053-2054

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See detailBayesian estimation of the true prevalence, sensitivity and specificity of the Rose Bengal and indirect ELISA tests in the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.
Sanogo, Moussa; Thys, Eric; Achi, Yaba L. et al

in Veterinary Journal (2013), 195

Serology is the most convenient method for detecting brucellosis but the efficient use of such tests in disease control requires evaluation of diagnostic performance and discriminative ability. The ... [more ▼]

Serology is the most convenient method for detecting brucellosis but the efficient use of such tests in disease control requires evaluation of diagnostic performance and discriminative ability. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the Rose Bengal test (RBT) and an indirect ELISA (iELISA) in diagnosing brucellosis in 995 serum samples collected from cattle in the Ivory Coast between 2005 and 2009. A Bayesian approach was used to evaluate the two tests by estimating their sensitivities and specificities. The correlation-adjusted sensitivity of the iELISA was estimated to be 96.1% (credibility interval [CrI], 92.7-99.8), whereas that of the RBT was 54.9% (CrI, 23.5-95.1). High correlation-adjusted specificities were found for both tests (95.0%; [CrI, 91.1-99.6] for the iELISA and 97.7%; [CrI, 95.3-99.4] for the RBT, respectively). The true prevalence of brucellosis was estimated from the serum samples to be 4.6% (95%; [CrI, 0.6-9.5]). The level of agreement between the two tests was evaluated using indices of agreement (n=995). Good agreement was found for negative results (96.6%; confidence interval [CI], 95.7-97.4), a finding supported by an estimated significant correlation of 0.37 (95%; CI, 0.01-0.73) within the sera testing negative. Agreement was lower for sera testing positive (52.2% CI: 41.9-62.5). The findings highlight the importance of using these two tests in combination as part of any brucellosis control programme. [less ▲]

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See detailThree cases of Parafilaria bovicola infection in Belgium, and a few recent epidemiological observations on this emergent disease
Caron, Yannick ULg; Groignet, Stéphanie; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 175

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012 ... [more ▼]

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012, the so-called bleeding spots were observed in two heifers and one bull in a cattle herd close to Namur (Belgium). The animals had been treated in December with an injectable ivermectin/closantel solution (Closamectin pour on®, Norbrook Lab) at the recommended dosage. Samples of serohaemorrhagic exudate and blood as well as skin biopsies were collected. Embryonated eggs of Parafilaria bovicola in the serohaemorrhagic exudate and high levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were detected. Clinically affected animals were treated with injectable ivermectin (Ivomec®, Merial) at 200 µg/kg. Two epidemiological phone surveys were carried out in the south of Belgium (Wallonia) in order to estimate the geographical distribution of this condition since it was first described and published in 2009. A standardized questionnaire was used and the results were analysed. Most outbreaks were recorded in the provinces of Liege and Luxembourg. The initial source of infection is still unknown but this parasitic infection is clearly spreading from the initial Belgian outbreak site. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding success of barn owls reflects risk of hantavirus infection
Heyman, P; Cochez, C; Simons, L et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 172

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See detailTraditional and quantitative assessment of acid-base and shock variables in horses with atypical myopathy
van Galen, G; Cerri, Simona ULg; Porter, S et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2013), 27(1), 186-193

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock status in horses with AM at admission. ANIMALS: 34 horses with AM, 15 healthy controls. METHODS: Retrospective case-control study. Records were searched for shock variables (packed cell volume [PCV], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], heart and respiratory rate) and acid-base variables (venous blood gas analysis, electrolytes, total protein, lactate) on admission. Base excess (BE) of free water (BEfw), chloride (BEcl), total protein (BEtp), and unidentified anions (BEua), anion gap (AG), measured strong ion difference (SIDm), and concentration of total nonvolatile weak acids ([Atot]) were calculated. Acid-base classifications, using simplified strong ion model and traditional approach, and shock grades were assigned. A 2-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Bonferroni correction compared variables in AM cases versus control horses. Significance was P < .05/16 for acid-base and P < .05/5 for shock variables. RESULTS: Tachycardia, tachypnea, and normal to increased PCV and BUN were common in AM cases. Respiratory, metabolic acid-base alterations, or both were mainly caused by respiratory alkalosis, lactic acidosis, and SIDm alkalosis, alone or in combination. Evaluated variables (except pH, potassium concentration, total protein, and related calculations) were significantly different (P < .001) between AM cases and control horses. The strong ion model provided a more accurate assessment than the traditional approach and identified mixed derangements. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Acid-base derangements should be evaluated in horses with AM and this preferably with the strong ion model. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary assessment of the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies consuming only ready-to-eat food
Scholl, Georges ULg; Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2013), 30(4), 654-659

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ... [more ▼]

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ready-to-eat baby food. As there is no Belgian baby dietary database, the furan exposure assessment was carried out by using Italian infant consumption database and Belgian contamination data. The estimated daily intake (EDI) was calculated according to a deterministic methodology. It involved 42 commercially available ready-to-eat baby food and 36 baby consumption records. The mean EDI was 1,460 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 which is 3.8 times higher than the 381 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 reported for Belgian adults, and 3.5 times higher than the 419 ng * (kgb.w. * day)-1 measured for Belgian children. To assess and characterize the risk for babies exposure the Margin of Exposure (MoE) was calculated. It highlighted that 74% of infants have a MoE below 1,000, with a minimum of 140. However, these are only preliminary results as they were calculated from a very small dataset and the infant cytochrome P450 activity is significantly different compared to the adult. Therefore, the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies should be assessed in a different manner. To this end, additional data regarding a baby diet as well as a better understanding of furan toxicity for babies are needed to characterize more accurately the risk for infants. [less ▲]

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See detailIsolement et caractérisation moléculaire du virus de la fièvre aphteuse au Bénin en 2010
Gorna, K; Houndjé, E; Romey, A et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailAntimicrobial Resistance in the food chain: a review
Verraes, Claire; Van Boxtael, Sigrid; Van Meervenne, Eva et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2013), 10

Antimicrobial resistant zoonotic pathogens present on food constitute a direct risk to public health. Antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal or pathogenic strains form an indirect risk to public ... [more ▼]

Antimicrobial resistant zoonotic pathogens present on food constitute a direct risk to public health. Antimicrobial resistance genes in commensal or pathogenic strains form an indirect risk to public health, as they increase the gene pool from which pathogenic bacteria can pick up resistance traits. Food can be contaminated with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and/or antimicrobial resistance genes in several ways. A first way is the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria on food selected by the use of antibiotics during agricultural production. A second route is the possible presence of resistance genes in bacteria that are intentionally added during the processing of food (starter cultures, probiotics, bioconserving microorganisms and bacteriophages). A last way is through cross-contamination with antimicrobial resistant bacteria during food processing. Raw food products can be consumed without having undergone prior processing or preservation and therefore hold a substantial risk for transfer of antimicrobial resistance to humans, as the eventually present resistant bacteria are not killed. As a consequence, transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes between bacteria after ingestion by humans may occur. Under minimal processing or preservation treatment conditions, sublethally damaged or stressed cells can be maintained in the food, inducing antimicrobial resistance build-up and enhancing the risk of resistance transfer. Food processes that kill bacteria in food products, decrease the risk of transmission of antimicrobial resistance. [less ▲]

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See detailZoonoses in Pet 1 birds: review and perspectives
Boseret, Géraldine ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Research (2013)

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