References of "Saegerman, Claude"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical pattern characterisation of cattle naturally infected by BTV-8 - Clinical characterisation of BTV-8 infected cattle
Zanella, G; Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Guyot, Hugues ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2013), 60(3), 231-237

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (19 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTools for surveillance system evaluation: Reviewing the need for participatory approaches
Calba, Clémentine; Grobois, Vladimir; Peyre, Marisa et al

Poster (2013, March)

While the need for effective animal health surveillance is widely recognised for diseases management, most veterinary services are facing significant budget constraints. There is a real need to develop ... [more ▼]

While the need for effective animal health surveillance is widely recognised for diseases management, most veterinary services are facing significant budget constraints. There is a real need to develop cost-effective surveillance systems. To ensure quality of these systems, there is a further need to design comprehensive, timely, effective and affordable evaluation frameworks. Depending on epidemiological, sociological and economic factors, animal diseases surveillance systems can be complex, likewise the choice of attributes to describe them and therefore the choice of methods and tools to evaluate them. Participatory approaches could provide the framework needed to tackle that complexity with sufficient flexibility. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrévalence des cas de lymphadénite granulomateuse sous‐maxillaire chez des porcs abattus en Belgique
Vyt, Philip; Denoël, Joseph ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

Poster (2013, February 06)

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These ... [more ▼]

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These nontuberculous mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens which have acquired an increasing importance in public health in recent decades due to their ability to cause lung diseases, lymphadenitis in children and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients ‐ even if the potential risk of infection of an immunocompromised person by MAC in the consumption of undercooked pork still has to be determined. The first objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis in pigs slaughtered in Belgium. Between August 2010 and September 2011, 16,211 carcasses were inspected by the same veterinarian in 2 slaughterhouses – one in Flanders, the other in Wallonia. Eighty‐six suspected cases of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis (0.53% of pigs; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.42‐0.65%) were identified, collected and submitted to histopathological (Ziehl‐Neelsen and haematoxylin‐eosin staining) and bacteriological (culture, PCR, molecular typing) tests. The second objective of the study was to characterize lesions and to identify the relative importance of MAC and Rhodococcus equi to explain the lesions. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) was isolated from 6 lymph nodes (7.0%; 95% CI: 2.6‐14.6%) and Rhodococcus equi from 45 (52.3%; 95% CI: 41.3‐63.2%). The final objective of the study consisted in farm investigation to evaluate the possible source of contamination of pigs by MAH. Potential sources such as sawdust, water, wild birds and/or cattle were identified. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan horses be clinically screened for West Nile fever ?
van galen; Calozet, L; Leblond, Agnès et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 172(4), 101

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFirst Survey on the Use of Antibiotics in Pig and Poultry Production in the Red River Delta Region of Vietnam
Pham Kim, Dang; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Douny, Caroline ULg et al

in Food and Public Health (2013), 3(5), 247-256

In Vietnam where epidemics occur regularly in animal production, the farmers consider antibiotics as one of the solutions to fight against livestock diseases, thus the risk of abuse, even illegal use of ... [more ▼]

In Vietnam where epidemics occur regularly in animal production, the farmers consider antibiotics as one of the solutions to fight against livestock diseases, thus the risk of abuse, even illegal use of antibiotics in livestock is very high. However, this is a recent issue and has not yet been thoroughly investigated. A cross-sectional study on the use of antibiotics in pig and poultry production as well as the farmer’s knowledge on the danger of the antibiotic use in three different animal production systems (farm household, semi-industrial and industrial) was conducted from July 2009 to March 2010 on 270 entities, in 3 representative localities of the Red River Delta (RRD). The results showed that a large volume of antibiotics was used arbitrary in all animal production systems. Animals were not only treated for acute diseases, but also for disease prevention, and for growth promotion. At least 45 antibiotics of more than 10 classes were used. Fifteen antibiotics were used in pig and poultry feed. For diseases treatment and prevention, antibiotics were used abusively and even illegally (e.g. chloramphenicol) by both farmers and veterinarians. The findings of this survey will permit developing new strategies for prudent use of antibiotics in livestock in Vietnam. These results will help not only to strengthen issues such as veterinary networks; antibiotics use guidance, residues monitoring systems and food safety, but also to improve awareness and ethics of producers and veterinary drug sellers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (6 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStandard epidemiological methods to understand and improve Apis mellifera health
vanEngelsdorp, D; Lengerich, E; Spleen, A et al

in Journal of Apicultural Research (2013), 52(1),

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrincipales caractéristiques epidémiologiques et impact économique de la fièvre aphteuse en afrique: Synthèse bibliographique
Houndjè, E; Kpodekon, M; Moutou, F et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2013), 157

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpatio-temporal clusters of incident human brucellosis cases in Ecuador
Ron; Benitez, W; Speybroeck, N et al

in Spatial and Spatiotemporal Epidemiology (2013), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailClinical Indicators of Exposure to Coxiella burnetii in Dairy Herds
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Speybroeck, N; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHydroxymethylfurfural: a possible emergent cause of honey bee mortality?
Zirbes, Lara ULg; Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; de Graaf, DC et al

in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2013), 61(49), 11865-11870

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSpatial distribution and risks factors of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin based meat inspection records
Goussanou, S. E.; Kpodekon, T. M.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology (2013), 4(8), 188-196

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution ... [more ▼]

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution. In this study, spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin was performed. By using the number of partial organ seizures at meat inspection, the study has revealed high risks of porcine cysticercosis in administrative districts of Aplahoue, Dogbo, Klouekanme and Lokossa. The proportion of seizures ranged from 0.06% for neck muscles to 0.69% for tongues. Spatial analysis of carcass seizure frequencies revealed Akpro Misserete, Avrankou, Dangbo, Porto-Novo, Ifangni and Aguegues as the most likely clusters (P<0.001) for porcine cysticercosis distribution. The risk factor found to be associated with the porcine distribution was the Taenia solium cysticerci positive testing using lingual examination by butchers and retailers. Catching of pig within the Zou and Mono department and pigs directly purchased by the butcher were found protective factors for distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIdentification of hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) and seroprevalence to Theileria parva in cattle raised in North Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo.
Kalume, Moise Kasereka; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Mbahikyavolo, Daniel Kambale et al

in Parasitology research (2013), 112(2), 789-97

This study aimed to identify tick species and to determine their relationship with the Theileria parva seroprevalence in cattle raised under an extensive farming system in North Kivu Province, Democratic ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to identify tick species and to determine their relationship with the Theileria parva seroprevalence in cattle raised under an extensive farming system in North Kivu Province, Democratic Republic of Congo in two agro-ecological zones namely medium (1,000-1,850 m) and high (>1,850 m) altitude. Among the 3,215 ticks collected on 482 animals, from February to April 2009, Rhipicephalus appendiculatus (64.26 %), the main vector of T. parva, was the most abundant species followed by Rhipicephalus decoloratus (35.49 %) and Amblyomma variegatum (0.25 %). The mean burden of R. appendiculatus tick per infested animal appeared significantly higher at medium (6.5 +/- 0.22 ticks) than at high (0.07 +/- 0.3 ticks) altitude (P < 0.05). However, an indirect fluorescent antibody test carried out on 450 blood samples revealed a global T. parva seroprevalence of 43 % (95 % CI: 38-47) which was not significantly (P > 0.05) different between medium (48.4 %; 95 % CI: 38-49) and high (41.9 %; 95 % CI: 35-49) altitude. These relatively low seroprevalences suggest that there is a state of endemicity to T. parva infection in the study area. The presence of the tick vector on animals was associated with an increased risk of being seropositive to T. parva infection (odds ratio = 2.04; 95 % CI: 1.8-2.3; P < 0.001). The results suggest the need for a longitudinal study to investigate the seasonal dynamics of tick species and T. parva infection. The rate of tick infection should also be evaluated in order to determine the intensity of T. parva transmission to cattle. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTicks and associated pathogens collected from dogs and cats in Belgium.
Claerebout, edwin; Losson, Bertrand ULg; cochez, christel et al

in Parasites & Vectors (2013), 6(183),

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (3 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailProposed terms and concepts for describing and evaluating animal-health surveillance systems
Hoinville, LJ; Alban, L; Drewe, JA et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2013), 112

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (5 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBrucellosis in terrestrial wildlife
Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Revue scientifique et technique - Office international des épizooties (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (4 ULg)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUnexpected Brucella suis Biovar 2 Infection in a Dairy Cow, Belgium
Fretin, D; Mori, M; Czaplicki, G et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2013), 19(12), 2053-2054

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 ULg)