References of "Saegerman, Claude"
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See detailFirst isolation and molecular characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus in Benin
Gorna, K; Houndjè, E; Romey, A et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2014)

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See detailECONOMIC IMPACT OF USING AN ANTIVIRAL IN THE CONTROL OF A FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE EPIZOOTIC IN SOUTHERN BELGIUM
Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Vandeputte, Sébastien ULg et al

Poster (2013, October)

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious pathogen of cloven-hoofed mammals and one of the biggest concerns for veterinary authorities. The control measures to be applied in case of an ... [more ▼]

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is a highly contagious pathogen of cloven-hoofed mammals and one of the biggest concerns for veterinary authorities. The control measures to be applied in case of an outbreak vary in function of the disease-free or disease-enzootic status. Vaccination depends on the prior identification of the involved viral serotype and subtype, it confers an immunity limited to 6 months and it requires between 4 to 7 days to trigger the immune response (i.e. immunity-gap). The use of anti-FMD drugs has been discussed as an alternative or supplementary method to be used in previously FMD-free countries/zones. Such an antiviral treatment could protect against the viral dissemination to fill the gap between vaccination and the rise of a protective immunity. Apart from broad spectrum antiviral agents, such as ribavirin, specific anti-FMDV molecules have been identified in vitro, but none of them has been used in clinical studies involving ruminants or pigs. Next to the anti-FMDV activity, the absence of toxicity and the withdrawal period influencing the food safety, the cost of the treatment would be another important parameter influencing the potential use of an antiviral agent in the control of a FMD outbreak. The aim of this study was to assess the economic impact of using an antiviral in the control of a FMD epizootic in southern Belgium (Walloon Region). This work was based on the results of previous investigations concerning the epidemiological and economic data of a FMD outbreak in Southern Belgium. In the considered scenario, the epizootic was caused by the introduction of an infected cow (during the incubation time) in a beef cattle farm during winter. During the two weeks between the brood cow introduction and the official declaration of the outbreak, animal movements occurred between other beef cattle farms. The economic effects of the epidemic were evaluated taking into account the air-borne transmission of FMDV, the occurrence of animal movements (two scenarios were considered, with a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 17 movements), the presence of bovine and small ruminant farms, as well as pig farms in the protection and surveillance zones around the initial and secondary outbreaks. The wild fauna was not involved in the epidemic. In order to integrate in the above scenario the application of an antiviral agent in the control of the disease, it was assumed that the efficacy of the anti-FMDV drug was proven by reducing viral excretion in infected animals as well as by preventing the infection in animals at risk. Two hypothetical prices were used to introduce in the model the costs related to the administration of the antiviral drug (5€ and 10€ per dose). Furthermore, different strategies of control could be envisaged, such as the administration of the drug to both domestic ruminants and pigs, or depending on the epidemiological role of these species in the FMD transmission and their density in the territory, the administration of the drug to only one of them. Other scenarios could be characterized by the use of the antiviral in the control of the epizootic within the protection and surveillance zones or in only one of them. The costs associated with the use of antivirals in the different proposed scenarios are compared to the costs and socio-economic losses associated with the FMD outbreak and the implementation of control measures. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding sites and species association of the main Bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus vectors, the Culicoides species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), in northern Europe
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Annales de la Société Entomologique de France (2013), 49(3), 335-344

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) and, as recently discovered, Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since ... [more ▼]

Several species of Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) biting midges are biological vectors of bluetongue virus (BTV) and, as recently discovered, Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in northern Europe. Since their recent emergence in this part of the continent, these diseases that affect domestic and wild ruminants have caused considerable economic losses to the sheep and cattle industries. The substrates that are suitable for larval development of the main vector species are still relatively unknown. This study assessed all the substrates present in the immediate surroundings of a Belgian cattle farm and aimed to highlight the main breeding sites of these midge species. A total of 1639 immature Culicoides and 1320 adult specimens belonging to 13 species were found in 15 out of the 43 substrates studied: maize silage residues for C. obsoletus/C. scoticus, old overwintered cattle dung in the meadow for C. chiopterus and C. dewulfi, ground of a flooded meadow, green filamentous algae and underlying substrate, silt from a pond, and ground of hollows caused by the crossing of machines on a dirt track for C. festivipennis, silt from a pond for C. nubeculosus, and ground of a flooded meadow for C. lupicaris. Identification of these micro-habitats and the associations among the species they contain could allow their localization and the development of new strategies of vector control, while preventing the creation of new Culicoides larval micro-habitats. Finally, measures designed to reduce larval populations could improve efficacy of vaccination campaigns against BTV in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatitis E virus infection in wild boars and humans in Belgium
Thiry, Damien ULg; Mauroy, Axel ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

Poster (2013, September)

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See detailTools for surveillance system evaluation: Reviewing the need for participatory approaches
Calba, Clémentine; Grobois, Vladimir; Peyre, Marisa et al

Poster (2013, March)

While the need for effective animal health surveillance is widely recognised for diseases management, most veterinary services are facing significant budget constraints. There is a real need to develop ... [more ▼]

While the need for effective animal health surveillance is widely recognised for diseases management, most veterinary services are facing significant budget constraints. There is a real need to develop cost-effective surveillance systems. To ensure quality of these systems, there is a further need to design comprehensive, timely, effective and affordable evaluation frameworks. Depending on epidemiological, sociological and economic factors, animal diseases surveillance systems can be complex, likewise the choice of attributes to describe them and therefore the choice of methods and tools to evaluate them. Participatory approaches could provide the framework needed to tackle that complexity with sufficient flexibility. [less ▲]

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See detailPrévalence des cas de lymphadénite granulomateuse sous‐maxillaire chez des porcs abattus en Belgique
Vyt, Philip; Denoël, Joseph ULg; Cassart, Dominique ULg et al

Poster (2013, February 06)

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These ... [more ▼]

In pigs the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes granulomatous lymphadenitis. Carcasses with such lesions must be detected, as parts of the affected carcasses and organs have to be condemned. These nontuberculous mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens which have acquired an increasing importance in public health in recent decades due to their ability to cause lung diseases, lymphadenitis in children and systemic infections in immunocompromised patients ‐ even if the potential risk of infection of an immunocompromised person by MAC in the consumption of undercooked pork still has to be determined. The first objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis in pigs slaughtered in Belgium. Between August 2010 and September 2011, 16,211 carcasses were inspected by the same veterinarian in 2 slaughterhouses – one in Flanders, the other in Wallonia. Eighty‐six suspected cases of submandibular granulomatous lymphadenitis (0.53% of pigs; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.42‐0.65%) were identified, collected and submitted to histopathological (Ziehl‐Neelsen and haematoxylin‐eosin staining) and bacteriological (culture, PCR, molecular typing) tests. The second objective of the study was to characterize lesions and to identify the relative importance of MAC and Rhodococcus equi to explain the lesions. Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH) was isolated from 6 lymph nodes (7.0%; 95% CI: 2.6‐14.6%) and Rhodococcus equi from 45 (52.3%; 95% CI: 41.3‐63.2%). The final objective of the study consisted in farm investigation to evaluate the possible source of contamination of pigs by MAH. Potential sources such as sawdust, water, wild birds and/or cattle were identified. [less ▲]

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See detailCan horses be clinically screened for West Nile fever ?
van galen; Calozet, L; Leblond, Agnès et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 172(4), 101

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See detailTicks and associated pathogens collected from dogs and cats in Belgium.
Claerebout, edwin; Losson, Bertrand ULg; cochez, christel et al

in Parasites & Vectors (2013), 6(183),

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See detailProposed terms and concepts for describing and evaluating animal-health surveillance systems
Hoinville, LJ; Alban, L; Drewe, JA et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2013), 112

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See detailBrucellosis in terrestrial wildlife
Godfroid, J; Garin-Bastuji, B; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Revue scientifique et technique - Office international des épizooties (2013)

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See detailUnexpected Brucella suis Biovar 2 Infection in a Dairy Cow, Belgium
Fretin, D; Mori, M; Czaplicki, G et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2013), 19(12), 2053-2054

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See detailSpatial distribution and risks factors of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin based meat inspection records
Goussanou, S. E.; Kpodekon, T. M.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in International Research Journal of Microbiology (2013), 4(8), 188-196

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution ... [more ▼]

Porcine cysticercosis, which is widely distributed in Africa, causes financial losses and diseases among humans. To control the disease in an area, it is important to know the geographical distribution. In this study, spatial distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin was performed. By using the number of partial organ seizures at meat inspection, the study has revealed high risks of porcine cysticercosis in administrative districts of Aplahoue, Dogbo, Klouekanme and Lokossa. The proportion of seizures ranged from 0.06% for neck muscles to 0.69% for tongues. Spatial analysis of carcass seizure frequencies revealed Akpro Misserete, Avrankou, Dangbo, Porto-Novo, Ifangni and Aguegues as the most likely clusters (P<0.001) for porcine cysticercosis distribution. The risk factor found to be associated with the porcine distribution was the Taenia solium cysticerci positive testing using lingual examination by butchers and retailers. Catching of pig within the Zou and Mono department and pigs directly purchased by the butcher were found protective factors for distribution of porcine cysticercosis in southern Benin. [less ▲]

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See detailBayesian estimation of the true prevalence, sensitivity and specificity of the Rose Bengal and indirect ELISA tests in the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.
Sanogo, Moussa; Thys, Eric; Achi, Yaba L. et al

in Veterinary Journal (2013), 195

Serology is the most convenient method for detecting brucellosis but the efficient use of such tests in disease control requires evaluation of diagnostic performance and discriminative ability. The ... [more ▼]

Serology is the most convenient method for detecting brucellosis but the efficient use of such tests in disease control requires evaluation of diagnostic performance and discriminative ability. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the Rose Bengal test (RBT) and an indirect ELISA (iELISA) in diagnosing brucellosis in 995 serum samples collected from cattle in the Ivory Coast between 2005 and 2009. A Bayesian approach was used to evaluate the two tests by estimating their sensitivities and specificities. The correlation-adjusted sensitivity of the iELISA was estimated to be 96.1% (credibility interval [CrI], 92.7-99.8), whereas that of the RBT was 54.9% (CrI, 23.5-95.1). High correlation-adjusted specificities were found for both tests (95.0%; [CrI, 91.1-99.6] for the iELISA and 97.7%; [CrI, 95.3-99.4] for the RBT, respectively). The true prevalence of brucellosis was estimated from the serum samples to be 4.6% (95%; [CrI, 0.6-9.5]). The level of agreement between the two tests was evaluated using indices of agreement (n=995). Good agreement was found for negative results (96.6%; confidence interval [CI], 95.7-97.4), a finding supported by an estimated significant correlation of 0.37 (95%; CI, 0.01-0.73) within the sera testing negative. Agreement was lower for sera testing positive (52.2% CI: 41.9-62.5). The findings highlight the importance of using these two tests in combination as part of any brucellosis control programme. [less ▲]

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See detailThree cases of Parafilaria bovicola infection in Belgium, and a few recent epidemiological observations on this emergent disease
Caron, Yannick ULg; Groignet, Stéphanie; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 175

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012 ... [more ▼]

Parafilariosis is a vector borne parasitic disease caused by the development of the nematode Parafilaria bovicola in the subcutaneous and intermuscular connective tissues of cattle. On February 28th 2012, the so-called bleeding spots were observed in two heifers and one bull in a cattle herd close to Namur (Belgium). The animals had been treated in December with an injectable ivermectin/closantel solution (Closamectin pour on®, Norbrook Lab) at the recommended dosage. Samples of serohaemorrhagic exudate and blood as well as skin biopsies were collected. Embryonated eggs of Parafilaria bovicola in the serohaemorrhagic exudate and high levels of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were detected. Clinically affected animals were treated with injectable ivermectin (Ivomec®, Merial) at 200 µg/kg. Two epidemiological phone surveys were carried out in the south of Belgium (Wallonia) in order to estimate the geographical distribution of this condition since it was first described and published in 2009. A standardized questionnaire was used and the results were analysed. Most outbreaks were recorded in the provinces of Liege and Luxembourg. The initial source of infection is still unknown but this parasitic infection is clearly spreading from the initial Belgian outbreak site. [less ▲]

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See detailBreeding success of barn owls reflects risk of hantavirus infection
Heyman, P; Cochez, C; Simons, L et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2013), 172

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See detailTraditional and quantitative assessment of acid-base and shock variables in horses with atypical myopathy
van Galen, G; Cerri, Simona ULg; Porter, S et al

in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (2013), 27(1), 186-193

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Descriptions of acid-base disturbances in atypical myopathy (AM) are limited. OBJECTIVES: Describe and compare traditional and quantitative acid-base abnormalities and cardiovascular shock status in horses with AM at admission. ANIMALS: 34 horses with AM, 15 healthy controls. METHODS: Retrospective case-control study. Records were searched for shock variables (packed cell volume [PCV], blood urea nitrogen [BUN], heart and respiratory rate) and acid-base variables (venous blood gas analysis, electrolytes, total protein, lactate) on admission. Base excess (BE) of free water (BEfw), chloride (BEcl), total protein (BEtp), and unidentified anions (BEua), anion gap (AG), measured strong ion difference (SIDm), and concentration of total nonvolatile weak acids ([Atot]) were calculated. Acid-base classifications, using simplified strong ion model and traditional approach, and shock grades were assigned. A 2-sample Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Bonferroni correction compared variables in AM cases versus control horses. Significance was P < .05/16 for acid-base and P < .05/5 for shock variables. RESULTS: Tachycardia, tachypnea, and normal to increased PCV and BUN were common in AM cases. Respiratory, metabolic acid-base alterations, or both were mainly caused by respiratory alkalosis, lactic acidosis, and SIDm alkalosis, alone or in combination. Evaluated variables (except pH, potassium concentration, total protein, and related calculations) were significantly different (P < .001) between AM cases and control horses. The strong ion model provided a more accurate assessment than the traditional approach and identified mixed derangements. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: Acid-base derangements should be evaluated in horses with AM and this preferably with the strong ion model. [less ▲]

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See detailPreliminary assessment of the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies consuming only ready-to-eat food
Scholl, Georges ULg; Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Scippo, Marie-Louise ULg et al

in Food Additives & Contaminants. Part A. Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure & Risk Assessment (2013), 30(4), 654-659

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ... [more ▼]

The risk linked to furan ingestion has been assessed in previous papers for Belgian adults and children (Scholl et al., 2012b; Scholl et al., 2012c). The present paper focuses on infants consuming only ready-to-eat baby food. As there is no Belgian baby dietary database, the furan exposure assessment was carried out by using Italian infant consumption database and Belgian contamination data. The estimated daily intake (EDI) was calculated according to a deterministic methodology. It involved 42 commercially available ready-to-eat baby food and 36 baby consumption records. The mean EDI was 1,460 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 which is 3.8 times higher than the 381 ng * (kgb.w.*day)-1 reported for Belgian adults, and 3.5 times higher than the 419 ng * (kgb.w. * day)-1 measured for Belgian children. To assess and characterize the risk for babies exposure the Margin of Exposure (MoE) was calculated. It highlighted that 74% of infants have a MoE below 1,000, with a minimum of 140. However, these are only preliminary results as they were calculated from a very small dataset and the infant cytochrome P450 activity is significantly different compared to the adult. Therefore, the risk linked to furan ingestion by babies should be assessed in a different manner. To this end, additional data regarding a baby diet as well as a better understanding of furan toxicity for babies are needed to characterize more accurately the risk for infants. [less ▲]

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