References of "Saegerman, Claude"
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See detailMonitoring of the intra-dermal tuberculosis skin test performed by Belgian field practitioners
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Walravens, K.; Salandre, O. et al

in Research in Veterinary Science (2011)

The present study aimed to monitor skin test practices as performed by veterinarian field practitioners in Belgium. For this purpose, an anonymous postal questionnaire was elaborated and dispatched to ... [more ▼]

The present study aimed to monitor skin test practices as performed by veterinarian field practitioners in Belgium. For this purpose, an anonymous postal questionnaire was elaborated and dispatched to veterinarians involved in bovine tuberculosis detection. The questionnaire included items focusing on the skin test performance. International experts in the field of bovine tuberculosis were asked to fill the questionnaire and a scoring scale was built as follows: 0='ideal' answer, 1=acceptable answer, whereas 2=unacceptable answer. Furthermore, experts were asked to rank the questionnaire's items according to their possible impact on the risk of not detecting reactors. A global score was further calculated for each participant and a comparison of practices was carried out between the two regions of the country, i.e. Wallonia and Flanders. Significant differences were observed between both regions, a harmonization at the country level is thus essential. No veterinarian summed a null score, corresponding to the ideal skin test procedure, which suggests that skin-testing is far from being performed correctly. Field practitioners need to be sensitized to the importance of correctly performing the test. The authors recommend the questionnaire is suitable for application in other countries or regions [less ▲]

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See detailEpidemiology of Q fever in animals and humans in the 21st century
Mainil, Jacques ULg; Porter, S.; Czaplicky, G. et al

Conference (2011)

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See detailQ Fever: Current State of Knowledge and Perspectives of Research of a Neglected Zoonosis
Porter, Sarah ULg; Czaplicki, G.; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in International Journal of Microbiology (2011)

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See detailQ fever IN JApaN: an update REVIEW
Porter, Sarah ULg; Czaplicki, G.; Mainil, Jacques ULg et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 149

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See detailHuman brucellosis in North-East Ecuador: prevalence, typifying Brucella spp., and risk factors
Ron-Roman, J; Benitez-Ortiz, Washington; Ron-Garrido, L et al

Poster (2011)

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See detailThe impact of naturally-occurring, trans-placental bluetongue virus serotype-8 infection on reproductive performance in sheep.
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Bolkaerts, Benoit; Baricalla, Christine et al

in Veterinary Journal (2011), 187(1), 72-80

Infection with bluetongue virus serotype (BTV)-8 occurred in ruminants in 2006 in Central-Western Europe. The trans-placental passage of this virus has been demonstrated in naturally- and experimentally ... [more ▼]

Infection with bluetongue virus serotype (BTV)-8 occurred in ruminants in 2006 in Central-Western Europe. The trans-placental passage of this virus has been demonstrated in naturally- and experimentally-infected cattle and in experimentally-infected sheep. Trans-placental transmission is potentially important in the 'over-wintering' of this virus and its subsequent impact on reproductive performance. This epidemiological study was carried out on a sheep flock in Belgium that had experienced a severe outbreak of BTV-8 infection, and where the seroprevalence had increased from 1.3% to 88% between January and November 2007. In total, 476 lambs and 26 aborted fetuses from 300 ewes, lambing at four distinct time periods, were investigated between November 2007 and May 2008. The following evidence suggested that BTV-8 infection occurred in utero: (1) positive PCR results from splenic tissue from aborted fetuses (n=4); (2) fetal malformations suggestive of BTV infection (n=10); (3) positive PCR results from red blood cells in-lambs (n=7), and (4) the presence of antibody at birth in viable lambs prior to the intake of colostrum (n=9). The evidence provided by this investigation strongly suggests that trans-placental BTV-8 infection occurs in naturally-infected sheep and the impact of infection on the reproductive performance of such a naive flock was considerable, with up to 25% of ewes aborting and with flock fertility reduced by 50%. The contribution of in utero-infected lambs to the over-wintering of BTV appears limited. [less ▲]

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See detailLa tuberculose à mycobacterium bovis en afrique subsaharienne
Boukary, A; Thys, E; Mamadou, S et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (2011), 155

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See detailA qualitative risk assessment methodology for scientific expert panels.
Dufour, B.; Plee, L.; Moutou, F. et al

in Revue Scientifique et Technique (International Office of Epizootics) (2011), 30(3), 673-81

Risk assessment can be either quantitative, i.e. providing a numeric estimate of the probability of risk and the magnitude of the consequences, or qualitative, using a descriptive approach. The French ... [more ▼]

Risk assessment can be either quantitative, i.e. providing a numeric estimate of the probability of risk and the magnitude of the consequences, or qualitative, using a descriptive approach. The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (ANSES), formerly the French Food Safety Agency (AFSSA), bases its assessments on the opinions of scientific panels, such as the ANSES Animal Health Scientific Panel (AH-SP). Owing to the lack of relevant data and the very short period of time usually allowed to assess animal health risks on particular topics, this panel has been using a qualitative risk method for evaluating animal health risks or crises for the past few years. Some experts have drawn attention to the limitations of this method, such as the need to extend the range of adjectives used for the lower probabilities and to develop a way to assess consequences. The aim of this paper is to describe the improved method now established by the AH-SP, taking into account the limitations of the first version. The authors describe a new set of levels for probabilities, as well as the items considered when addressing either animal or human health consequences. [less ▲]

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See detailThe use of modelling to evaluate and adapt strategies for animal disease control.
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Porter, S. R.; Humblet, M. F.

in Revue Scientifique et Technique (International Office of Epizootics) (2011), 30(2), 555-69

Disease is often associated with debilitating clinical signs, disorders or production losses in animals and/or humans, leading to severe socio-economic repercussions. This explains the high priority that ... [more ▼]

Disease is often associated with debilitating clinical signs, disorders or production losses in animals and/or humans, leading to severe socio-economic repercussions. This explains the high priority that national health authorities and international organisations give to selecting control strategies for and the eradication of specific diseases. When a control strategy is selected and implemented, an effective method of evaluating its efficacy is through modelling. To illustrate the usefulness of models in evaluating control strategies, the authors describe several examples in detail, including three examples of classification and regression tree modelling to evaluate and improve the early detection of disease: West Nile fever in equids, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and multifactorial diseases, such as colony collapse disorder (CCD) in the United States. Also examined are regression modelling to evaluate skin test practices and the efficacy of an awareness campaign for bovine tuberculosis (bTB); mechanistic modelling to monitor the progress of a control strategy for BSE; and statistical nationwide modelling to analyse the spatio-temporal dynamics of bTB and search for potential risk factors that could be used to target surveillance measures more effectively. In the accurate application of models, an interdisciplinary rather than a multidisciplinary approach is required, with the fewest assumptions possible. [less ▲]

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See detailCalculating and Reporting Managed Honey Bee Colony Losses
vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Brodschneider, Robert; Brostaux, Yves ULg et al

in Yoder, Jay (Ed.) Honey Bee Colony Health (2011)

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See detailBovine tuberculosis prevalence survey on cattle in the rural livestock system of Torodi (Niger).
Boukary, Abdou Razac; Thys, Eric; Abatih, Emmanuel et al

in PLoS ONE (2011), 6(9), 24629

BACKGROUND: Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a widespread zoonosis in developing countries but has received little attention in sub-Saharan Africa, especially in Niger. Recent investigations confirmed the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a widespread zoonosis in developing countries but has received little attention in sub-Saharan Africa, especially in Niger. Recent investigations confirmed the high incidence of the disease in cattle slaughtered in an abattoir in Niamey. The fact that most of the animals in which M. bovis has been identified were from the rural area of Torodi implied the existence of a probable source of BTB in this region. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of BTB infection in cattle and to identify risk factors for infection in human and cattle populations in Torodi. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A survey was carried out at the level of households keeping livestock (n = 51). The questionnaire was related to the potential risk factors and the presence of clinical signs of TB both in animals and humans. Comparative Intradermal Tuberculin Test was conducted to determine the TB status in cattle (n = 393). The overall apparent individual animal prevalence of tuberculin reactors was 3.6% (CI: 95%, 1.9-5.9), whereas the individual true prevalence was estimated at 0.8% (CI: 95%, 0.0-5.0). Using a multivariate logistic regression analysis and a classification tree analysis, the only household level risk factor that significantly influenced the presence of BTB in cattle was the presence of animals coughing in the herd (OR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.12-19.71, p-value = 0.034). The lack of the practice of quarantine was borderline significant (OR = 4.2, 95% CI: 0.96-18.40, p-value = 0.056). CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The study confirmed that BTB is endemic in cattle in Torodi and the risk of the transmission of the disease to humans is potentially high. For the control of the disease in livestock, slaughtering of infected animals and the compensation of the owners is needed. Collaboration between the veterinary and the medical sectors, in the diagnosis, monitoring, prevention and control of BTB is strongly encouraged. [less ▲]

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See detailBrucellosis at the animal/ecosystem/human interface at the beginning of the 21st century.
Godfroid, J.; Scholz, H. C.; Barbier, T. et al

in Preventive Veterinary Medicine (2011), 102(2), 118-31

Following the recent discovery of new Brucella strains from different animal species and from the environment, ten Brucella species are nowadays included in the genus Brucella. Although the intracellular ... [more ▼]

Following the recent discovery of new Brucella strains from different animal species and from the environment, ten Brucella species are nowadays included in the genus Brucella. Although the intracellular trafficking of Brucella is well described, the strategies developed by Brucella to survive and multiply in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells, particularly to access nutriments during its intracellular journey, are still largely unknown. Metabolism and virulence of Brucella are now considered to be two sides of the same coin. Mechanisms presiding to the colonization of the pregnant uterus in different animal species are not known. Vaccination is the cornerstone of control programs in livestock and although the S19, RB51 (both in cattle) and Rev 1 (in sheep and goats) vaccines have been successfully used worldwide, they have drawbacks and thus the ideal brucellosis vaccine is still very much awaited. There is no vaccine available for pigs and wildlife. Animal brucellosis control strategies differ in the developed and the developing world. Most emphasis is put on eradication and on risk analysis to avoid the re-introduction of Brucella in the developed world. Information related to the prevalence of brucellosis is still scarce in the developing world and control programs are rarely implemented. Since there is no vaccine available for humans, prevention of human brucellosis relies on its control in the animal reservoir. Brucella is also considered to be an agent to be used in bio- and agroterrorism attacks. At the animal/ecosystem/human interface it is critical to reduce opportunities for Brucella to jump host species as already seen in livestock, wildlife and humans. This task is a challenge for the future in terms of veterinary public health, as for wildlife and ecosystem managers and will need a "One Health" approach to be successful. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical diagnosis of West Nile Fever in equids by classification and regression tree (CART) analysis and comparative study of clinical appearance in three European countries
Porter, Sarah ULg; Leblond, A.; Lecollinet, S. et al

in Transboundary and Emerging Diseases (2011), 58(3), 197-205

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See detailEpidemiology of pestivirus infection in wild ungulates of the French South Alps
Martin, C.; Letellier, C.; Caij, B. et al

in Veterinary Microbiology (2011), 147(3-4), 320-328

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See detailOriginal findings associated with two cases of bovine papular stomatitis
Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Gallina, L. et al

in Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2011), 49(12), 4397-4400

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See detailTwo alternative inocula to reproduce bluetongue virus serotype 8 disease in calves
Martinelle, Ludovic ULg; Dal Pozzo, Fabiana ULg; Sarradin, P. et al

in Vaccine (2011), 29

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See detailA survey of the transmission of infectious diseases/infections between wild and domestic ungulates in Europe
Martin, C.; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre ULg; Brochier, B. et al

in Veterinary Research (2011)

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See detailApproche globale d’un niveau de santé mammaire à l’échelle d’une région au travers de ses principaux indicateurs de terrain
Theron, Léonard ULg; Bertozzi, Carlo; Piraux, Emile et al

in RAHAL, Karim (Ed.) Recueil des 3èmes Journées d’Epidémiologie Animale (2010, November 23)

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