References of "Saegerman, Claude"
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See detailBreeding sites of bluetongue virus vectors, Belgium
Zimmer, Jean-Yves ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Losson, Bertrand ULg et al

in Emerging Infectious Diseases (2010), 16(3), 575-576

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See detailLe point sur les causes des pertes d'abeilles domestiques en Région Wallonne
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Mignon, Jacques ULg; Widart, Joëlle ULg et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailRéponses aux questions que l'on se pose sur la mortalité des abeilles domestiques en Belgique
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Mignon, Jacques ULg; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2010)

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See detailAge-related infection and transmission patterns of human cysticercosis
Praet, N.; Speybroeck, N.; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, R. et al

in International Journal for Parasitology (2010), 40

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See detailComparison between active and passive surveillance within the Network of Epidemiological Surveillance of Animal Diseases in Chad (REPIMAT)
Ouagal, M.; Hendrikx, P.; Saegerman, Claude ULg et al

in Acta Tropica (2010), 116(2), 147-151

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See detailDiagnosis of brucellosis in livestock and wildlife.
Godfroid, Jacques; Nielsen, Klaus; Saegerman, Claude ULg

in Croatian Medical Journal (2010), 51(4), 296-305

AIM: To describe and discuss the merits of various direct and indirect methods applied in vitro (mainly on blood or milk) or in vivo (allergic test) for the diagnosis of brucellosis in animals. METHODS ... [more ▼]

AIM: To describe and discuss the merits of various direct and indirect methods applied in vitro (mainly on blood or milk) or in vivo (allergic test) for the diagnosis of brucellosis in animals. METHODS: The recent literature on brucellosis diagnostic tests was reviewed. These diagnostic tests are applied with different goals, such as national screening, confirmatory diagnosis, certification, and international trade. The validation of such diagnostic tests is still an issue, particularly in wildlife. The choice of the testing strategy depends on the prevailing brucellosis epidemiological situation and the goal of testing. RESULTS: Measuring the kinetics of antibody production after Brucella spp. infection is essential for analyzing serological results correctly and may help to predict abortion. Indirect ELISAs help to discriminate 1) between false positive serological reactions and true brucellosis and 2) between vaccination and infection. Biotyping of Brucella spp. provides valuable epidemiological information that allows tracing an infection back to the sources in instances where several biotypes of a given Brucella species are circulating. Polymerase chain reaction and new molecular methods are likely to be used as routine typing and fingerprinting methods in the coming years. CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of brucellosis in livestock and wildlife is complex and serological results need to be carefully analyzed. The B. abortus S19 and B. melitensis Rev. 1 vaccines are the cornerstones of control programs in cattle and small ruminants, respectively. There is no vaccine available for pigs or for wildlife. In the absence of a human brucellosis vaccine, prevention of human brucellosis depends on the control of the disease in animals. [less ▲]

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See detailNew assessment of bovine tuberculosis risk factors in Belgium based on nationwide molecular epidemiology.
Humblet, M.-F.; Gilbert, M.; Govaerts, M. et al

in Journal of Clinical Microbiology (2010), 48(8), 2802-8

This assessment aimed to elaborate a statistical nationwide model for analyzing the space-time dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in search of potential risk factors that could be used to better target ... [more ▼]

This assessment aimed to elaborate a statistical nationwide model for analyzing the space-time dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in search of potential risk factors that could be used to better target surveillance measures. A database comprising Mycobacterium bovis molecular profiles from all isolates obtained from Belgian outbreaks during the 1995-to-2006 period (n = 415) allowed the identification of a predominant spoligotype (SB0162). Various databases compiling 49 parameters to be tested were queried using a multiple stepwise logistic regression to assess bovine tuberculosis risk factors. Two isolate datasets were analyzed: the first included all Mycobacterium bovis isolates, while the second included only data related to the SB0162 type strain. When all Mycobacterium bovis isolates were included in the model, several risk factors were identified: history of bovine tuberculosis in the herd (P < 0.001), proximity of an outbreak (P < 0.001), cattle density (P < 0.001), and annual amplitude of mean middle-infrared temperature (P < 0.001). The approach restricted to the predominant SB0162 type strain additionally highlighted the proportion of movements from an infected area during the current year as a main risk factor (P = 0.009). This study identified several risk factors for bovine tuberculosis in cattle, highlighted the usefulness of molecular typing in the study of bovine tuberculosis epidemiology, and suggests a difference of behavior for the predominant type strain. It also emphasizes the role of animals' movements in the transmission of the disease and supports the importance of controlling trade movements. [less ▲]

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See detailCanine leishmaniasis in Algeria: true prevalence and diagnostic test characteristics in groups of dogs of different functional type.
Adel, Amel; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Speybroeck, Niko et al

in Veterinary Parasitology (2010), 172(3-4), 204-13

A Bayesian approach was used to assess the prevalence of Canine leishmaniasis and evaluate three serological diagnostic tests: indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), direct agglutination test, and ... [more ▼]

A Bayesian approach was used to assess the prevalence of Canine leishmaniasis and evaluate three serological diagnostic tests: indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), direct agglutination test, and particle gel immuno-assay (PaGIA) for Canine leishmaniasis (CL) in Algiers. Four hundred and sixty-two dogs were involved in this study and divided in four groups according to their functional type: stray dogs, farm dogs, national guard dogs and pet dogs. The stray dog group showed the highest prevalence of leishmaniasis (11.7%), followed by the national guard dogs (9.7%) and the farm dogs (5.9%). IFAT was shown to be the most sensitive test in all groups. However, IFAT specificity was considerably lowered in the farm dog group: 65.2% versus 94.5% for the stray dogs. A considerable drop in PaGIA specificity was noted in the stray dogs group. The results of the current study demonstrate the variability of test characteristics in different situations and underline the danger of using standard values, without verifying their appropriateness for the specific purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailPhenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Brucella strains isolated from cattle in the Gambia.
Bankole, A. A.; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Berkvens, D. et al

in Veterinary Record : Journal of the British Veterinary Association (2010), 166(24), 753-6

Thirty-five serum samples and six hygroma fluid samples were collected from sexually mature cattle in one herd with clinical signs of brucellosis (abortion and hygromas) in the Western Region of the ... [more ▼]

Thirty-five serum samples and six hygroma fluid samples were collected from sexually mature cattle in one herd with clinical signs of brucellosis (abortion and hygromas) in the Western Region of the Gambia in order to isolate and characterise Brucella species. Information on the sex, age, number of calvings, number of abortions, presence of hygromas, and presence of orchitis was also collected for each animal sampled. Twenty-six (74 per cent) of the serum samples were positive in the rose bengal test and 29 (83 per cent) were positive by indirect ELISA. Three isolates of Brucella, biotyped as Brucella abortus biovar 3, were cultured from six hygroma fluid samples. The multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis assay clustered the isolates as B abortus with the same profile for the three isolates, suggesting a common origin of contamination. [less ▲]

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See detailInfection with versus exposure to Taenia solium: what do serological test results tell us?
Praet, Nicolas; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Richar; Speybroeck, Niko et al

in American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (The) (2010), 83(2), 413-5

Taenia solium cysticercosis is an endemic zoonosis in many developing countries. Serological tests are the most appropriate diagnostic tools to understand the transmission dynamics of the parasite, but ... [more ▼]

Taenia solium cysticercosis is an endemic zoonosis in many developing countries. Serological tests are the most appropriate diagnostic tools to understand the transmission dynamics of the parasite, but the performances of these methods in such a setting are not known. A south Ecuadorian human population living in an endemic area was tested using three common serological tests. Because none of them is a gold standard, a Bayesian Latent Class analysis was used to estimate the test characteristics. Two definitions of a case were considered to differentiate between prevalence of current infection and prior exposure to the parasite. Differences between the performances of the same test in function of the definition of a case were observed. This study shows that test results and prior information should be interpreted carefully in a Bayesian analysis framework, particularly when the latter is based on clinical studies. [less ▲]

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See detailLa fièvre Q: actualités épidémiologiques
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Czaplicki, G.; Porter, Sarah ULg

in Point Vétérinaire (2010), 304

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See detailA clear and present danger tick borne diseases in Europe
Heyman, P.; Cochez, C.; Hofhuis, A. et al

in Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy (2010), 8(1), 33-50

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See detailSURVEY ON ANTIBIOTIC USE IN PIG AND CHICKEN PRODUCTION IN RED RIVER DELTA OF VIETNAM.
Pham Kim, Dang; Saegerman, Claude ULg; Vu Dinh, Ton et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailThe most likely time and place of introduction of BTV8 into belgian ruminants
Saegerman, Claude ULg; Mellor, Philip; Uyttenhoef, Aude ULg et al

in PLoS ONE (2010), 5(2),

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See detailEpidemiologic study of pestivirus infection in both wild and domestic ruminants A survey in the Ubaye Valley (Alpine mountains, France)
Martin, Claire; Duquesne, Véronique; Adam, Gilbert et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailModelling BSE trend over time in europe, a risk assessment perspective
Ducrot, C.; Sala, C.; Ru, G. et al

in European Journal of Epidemiology (2010)

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See detailA survey of honey bee colony losses in Belgium, fall 2008 to spring 2009
Nguyen, Bach Kim ULg; Mignon, Jacques ULg; Laget, D. et al

Conference (2010)

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See detailWeignhing risk factors associated with bee colony collapse disorder by classification and regression tree analysis
Vanengelsdorp, D.; Speybroeck, N.; Evans, J. et al

Poster (2010)

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See detailAssessment methodology of the intradermal tuberculosis skin test performed in cattle by field practitioners
Humblet, Marie-France ULg; Walravens, K.; Salandre, O. et al

Poster (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (1 ULg)