References of "Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine"
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See detailA new topical treatment for resistant herpes simplex infections.
Snoeck, R.; Andrei, G.; De Clercq, E. et al

in New England Journal of Medicine [=NEJM] (1993), 329(13), 968-9

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See detailTransforming growth factor ß as a neuronoglial signal during peripheral nervous sytem response to injury.
Rogister, Bernard ULg; Delrée, P.; Leprince, Pierre ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1993), 34

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See detailMeningoradiculoneuritis due to acyclovir-resistant varicella-zoster virus in a patient with aids
Snoeck, R.; Gerard, M.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Infectious Diseases (1993), 168(5), 1330-1331

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See detailNeurotransmitter phenotype plasticity in adult dorsal root ganglia neurons
Moonen, Gustave ULg; Delrée, P.; Martin, Didier ULg et al

in Restorative Neurology & Neuroscience (1993), 5

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See detailIn Vitro and in Vivo Modulation of 5-Hydroxytryptamine-, Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone- and Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide-Like Immunoreactivities in Adult Rat Sensory Neurons
Delree, P.; Martin, Didier ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Neuroscience (1992), 51(2), 401-10

In a previous work we have shown that culturing adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons modifies their neurotransmitter phenotype in such a way that cultured neurons synthesize transmitters that are not ... [more ▼]

In a previous work we have shown that culturing adult rat dorsal root ganglia neurons modifies their neurotransmitter phenotype in such a way that cultured neurons synthesize transmitters that are not found in situ, while several other transmitters are expressed in a much higher percentage of neurons in culture than in situ [Schoenen J. et al. (1989) J. Neurosci. Res. 22, 473-487]. The aim of the present study was to investigate the origin and the nature of the relevant environmental signals that allow this plasticity to be expressed, focusing on three neurotransmitters: 5-hydroxytryptamine, thyrotropin-releasing hormone and calcitonin-gene related peptide. The main results can be summarized as follows: (1) culturing cells in fetal calf serum or on feeder layers of astrocytes, Schwann cells or fibroblasts partially inhibits the serotoninergic phenotype of dorsal root ganglia neurons; (2) in vivo disconnection of dorsal root ganglia from their spinal targets but not from their peripheral or supraspinal targets induces a significant increase of the percentage of 5-hydroxytryptamine- and thyrotropin-releasing hormone-positive neurons in disconnected ganglia; (3) growth factors such as ciliary neuronotrophic factor or basic fibroblast growth factor but not nerve growth factor repress 5-hydroxytryptamine and calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in cultured sensory neurons. In conclusion, neurotransmitter gene expression of adult dorsal root ganglia neurons is controlled by complex influences. Our data suggest that thyrotropin-releasing hormone and 5-hydroxytryptamine gene expression are tonically repressed in vivo by factors originating from the spinal segmental level and that growth factors such as ciliary neurotrophic factor or basic fibroblast growth factor could be potential vectors of this repressing effect. [less ▲]

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See detailFlow cytometric method for the detection of gpI antigens of varicella zoster virus and evaluation of anti-VZV agents
Snoeck, R.; Schols, D.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Virological Methods (1992), 38(2), 243-254

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for a primary infection (varicella.) and, upon reactivation, zoster, which in immunocompromised patients, may both lead to life-threatening disseminated disease ... [more ▼]

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is responsible for a primary infection (varicella.) and, upon reactivation, zoster, which in immunocompromised patients, may both lead to life-threatening disseminated disease. There is a great need for antiviral compounds that are effective inhibitors of VZV replication and for rapid and accurate methods for evaluating viral sensitivity to candidate anti-VZV drugs. With the monoclonal antibody (mAb) (VL8), which is directed against the gpI of VZV, and using the fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) we could readily demonstrate expression of the VZV gpI antigen at 3-4 days after VZV infection. (E)-5-(2-Bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU), (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (HPMPA) and (S)-1-(3-hydro-xy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine (HPMC) were shown to be potent inhibitors of VZV replication by this assay. HPMPA and HPMPC were also active against thymidine kinase-deficient (TK-) VZV whereas BVDU was not. The flow cytometric method based on the use of mAb VL8 may be of considerable help for the early diagnosis of VZV infection and evaluation of viral sensitivity to antiviral drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailDetection by PCR of varicella zoster virus DNA during primary infection in mice
Plumier, Jean-Christophe ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Debrus, Serge et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1992), 100

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See detailLa régulation de l'expression des gènes du virus de la varicelle et du zona
Piette, Jacques ULg; Defechereux, Patricia; Baudoux, Laurence et al

in Annales de Médecine Vétérinaire (1992), 136(8), 627-635

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the alphaherpesvirus family and shares many important structural and functional similarities with other members of the family such as herpes simplex virus type 1 ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) belongs to the alphaherpesvirus family and shares many important structural and functional similarities with other members of the family such as herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). VZV is responsible for two different clinical syndromes, varicella which is the result of the primary infection and zoster which is due to virus reactivation remaining latent in the peripheral nervous system. VZV DNA is 124,884 base pair long and encodes four regulatory proteins (IE4, IE61, IE62 and IE63). Using transient expression systems, we have shown that IE4, IE62 and IE63 can regulate the expression of an indicator gene driven by various VZV promoter regions, demonstrating that these proteins play important roles in the infectious cycle. [less ▲]

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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution but fail to induce viral persistence in vitro.
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Marc, Philippe; Lebon, Linda et al

in Journal of Virology (1992), 66(12), 7499-504

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) persists in human sensory ganglia. One of the hypotheses to explain the induction or the maintenance of VZV latency is that it could be promoted by the immune response itself. It is known that in the case of viruses which bud off the infected cell membrane, virus-specific antibodies can induce antigenic modulation, i.e., spatial redistribution of viral antigens and modulation of their synthesis. To determine whether antigenic modulation occurs during VZV infection in vitro and could possibly be involved in viral persistence, we have grown infected cells in the presence of anti-VZV antibodies either transiently or permanently. The distribution of immune complexes and viral proteins was then analyzed. In transient immunomodulation experiments, the distribution of one or more viral antigens was modified not only in the cytoplasmic membranes but also in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm of infected cells. When infected cells were kept permanently in the presence of antibodies, the same pattern of redistribution of immune complexes was observed and the localization of internal viral glycoproteins was significantly modified. However, antibodies did not prevent the lytic effect of infection; they altered neither the infectious virus yield nor the Western immunoblot pattern of viral proteins, suggesting that immunomodulation is not the primary effector of viral persistence. [less ▲]

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See detailTwo-dimensional study of varicella-zoster virus proteins
Debrus, S.; Duquesne, Patricia ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

Poster (1992)

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See detailGranulomatous reactions following herpes-zoster contain varicella-zoster glycoprotein GPI
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Cloes, Jean-Michel et al

in Journal of Investigative Dermatology (1992), 98(4), 522

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See detailAn in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus latent infection of dorsal root ganglia
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Delrée, P. et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1990), 26(1), 83-89

We describe here the first in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latent infection in the adult rat peripheral nervous system. Infected Mewo cells were injected subcutaneously along the spine of ... [more ▼]

We describe here the first in vivo model of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) latent infection in the adult rat peripheral nervous system. Infected Mewo cells were injected subcutaneously along the spine of healthy adult rats. No clinical sign of infection was observed even 9 months after inoculation. Humoral immune response to VZV was detected in all infected animals throughout the study (9 months). The presence of viral material in dissociated and cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from inoculated animals was studied by immunoperoxidase and in situ hybridization. When DRGs from infected animals were plated in culture from 1 month and up to 9 months after inoculation, viral nucleic acids and proteins were detected in neurons. Furthermore, trypsinization and subcultivation of infected neurons in culture is needed to reactivate infectious virus at least in some of the neurons. This model provides a useful tool for studying 1) the molecular mechanisms leading to an in vivo latency, 2) the role of the immune system, in particular cellular immunity, on the establishment, maintenance, and reactivation of latency, 3) the neurotropism of mutant viruses, and 4) the effects of antiviral agents. [less ▲]

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See detailAcute and persistent varicella-zoster virus infection of human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines
Bourdon-Wouters, C.; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Neuroscience Research (1990), 26(1), 90-97

Human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines were infected in vitro with varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Infected human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) supported the synthesis of abundant viral antigens as ... [more ▼]

Human and murine neuroblastoma cell lines were infected in vitro with varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Infected human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) supported the synthesis of abundant viral antigens as detected by indirect immunoperoxidase labeling using human serum rich in anti-VZV antibodies and did not survive the infection. In situ hybridization (ISH) with VZV-cloned probes revealed a strong hybridization signal in these infected cells. During cultivation, the virus was released in the culture medium, and viral polypeptides were revealed by Western blotting of infected cells, using either a monoclonal anti-gpI antibody or a rabbit antiserum. All these findings indicate that IMR-32 cells support a productive and lytic infection by VZV, whether infected by cell-free virus or by cocultivation with infected cells. Murine neuroblastoma cells (neuro-2A) survived VZV infection and did not produce any infectious virus. No VZV-specific proteins were detected in infected cells either by immunolabeling or by Western blotting. However, viral nucleic acids could be detected by ISH, indicating that mouse neuroblastoma cells displayed a nonproductive, nonlytic infection. Infected neuro-2A cells have been examined by ISH using probes corresponding to immediate early (IE) genes 4, 62, and 63 and late (L) gene 31 encoding gpII. A strong hybridization signal was detected when infected cells were probed with a fragment containing the IE genes 62 and 63. Lower levels of hybridization were detected with the other probes, corresponding to IE or L genes. These systems allow comparative molecular analysis of persistent and acute infection of nerve cells by VZV. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus infection of adult rat sensory neurons in vitro.
Merville-Louis, M. P.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Delree, P. et al

in Journal of Virology (1989), 63(7), 3155-60

We report here an in vitro model of neuronal infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Such a model has been achieved by using dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia cells infected by cocultivation ... [more ▼]

We report here an in vitro model of neuronal infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV). Such a model has been achieved by using dissociated adult rat dorsal root ganglia cells infected by cocultivation with VZV-infected MRC5 cells or with cell-free virus. Indirect VZV immunolabeling, in situ hybridization, and neuron-specific immunolabeling demonstrated that VZV infection occurred selectively in neurons. VZV-specific immunolabeling detected a few neurons 1 or 2 days postinfection but not later. Genome detection using cloned VZV DNA probes revealed a hybridization signal primarily with RNA. Within 1 to 6 days postinfection, a progressive increase of VZV-specific hybridization was observed in up to 50% of the neurons. RNAs corresponding to immediate-early, early, and late genes were found, and transcripts of immediate-early gene 63 were particularly abundant. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunomodulation of varicella-zoster virus antigens
Marc, Ph.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville-Louis, M. P. et al

Poster (1989)

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See detailIn vivo model of varicella-zoster virus latency in the nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville-Louis, Marie Paule; Delrée, P. et al

Conference (1989)

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See detailLatent infection in vivo by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in the rat nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg; Delrée, P. et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailAntibodies to varicella-zoster virus modulate antigen distribution in cultured infected cells
Marc, Ph.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule ULg et al

in Archives Internationales de Physiologie et de Biochimie (1989), 97

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See detailVaricella-Zoster virus infection in the nervous system: in vitro and in vivo models
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Merville, Marie-Paule; Bourdon-Wouters, Christine et al

in Acta Neurologica Belgica (1989), 88

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