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See detailDistribution of varicella-zoster virus gpI and gpII and corresponding genome sequences in the skin
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Delvenne, Philippe ULg; Debrus, S. et al

in Journal of Medical Virology (1995), 46(2), 91-96

In the course of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, some viral capsid antigens are found in the epidermis and dermis. The aim of this study was to investigate the localisation of two major VZV ... [more ▼]

In the course of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infection, some viral capsid antigens are found in the epidermis and dermis. The aim of this study was to investigate the localisation of two major VZV glycoproteins (gpI and gpII) and of their respective genes in the skin. The distribution of VZV gpI and II in 27 formalin fixed paraffin embedded skin biopsies from herpes tester eruptions were compared by immunohistochemistry. Double immunostaining was carried our to identify infected cells. The presence of viral nucleic acids coding for gpI and gpII was examined by in situ hybridisation. The distribution of gpI and gpII and their corresponding genome sequences was similar in the epidermis, gpI and gpII were also detected in dermal FXIIIa positive dendrocytes, in Mac 387 and CD68 positive macrophages, and in perineural and endothelial cells. However, the corresponding viral nucleic acids were rarely and barely detected in these cells of the dermis. It is concluded that VZV infection of epithelial cells follows a different course than in dermal cells. (C) 1995 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus gene 63 encodes an immediate-early protein that is abundantly expressed during latency
Debrus, Serge; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg et al

in Journal of Virology (1995), 69(5), 3240-3245

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gene 63 encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 30.5 kDa which has amino acid similarities with the immediate-early (IE) protein 22 (ICP-22) of herpes simplex ... [more ▼]

Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gene 63 encodes a protein with a predicted molecular mass of 30.5 kDa which has amino acid similarities with the immediate-early (IE) protein 22 (ICP-22) of herpes simplex virus type 1. In order to study the expression of this protein during lytic and latent infection, gene 63 was cloned in frame and downstream from the glutathione-S-transferase gene, expressed as a fusion protein, and purified. In VZV-infected Vero cells, antibodies directed against this protein detect two polypeptides of 45 and 38 kDa which are localized both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Using a sequential combination of transcription and protein synthesis inhibitors (actinomycin D and cycloheximide, respectively), we demonstrated the immediate-early nature of this protein, which can thus be named IE63. Using a rat model of VZV latency, we showed that IE63 is heavily expressed, essentially in neurons, during latency. IE63 can also be detected in the skin of patients showing early herpes zoster symptoms. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus latency in the adult rat is a useful model for human latent infection
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Debrus, Serge; Nikkels, Arjen ULg et al

in Neurology (1995), 45(12, suppl. 8), 18-20

A model of latent infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was obtained in the adult rat. Inoculation of VZV-infected cells in the skin led to infection of the peripheral nervous system. Latency was ... [more ▼]

A model of latent infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was obtained in the adult rat. Inoculation of VZV-infected cells in the skin led to infection of the peripheral nervous system. Latency was characterized by a long-lasting presence of the viral genome, of selected viral gene transcripts, and of at least one viral protein in the dorsal root ganglia. Reactivation has not been obtained in vivo, but has occurred ex vivo after repeated stresses. Many similarities with VZV latency in humans were found, making this model useful for vaccine and antiviral studies. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricella-zoster virus induces apoptosis in cell culture
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Thonard, P.; Schoonbroodt, Sonia et al

in Journal of General Virology (The) (1995), 76(Pt 11), 2875-2879

Apoptosis is an active mechanism of cell death which can be initiated in response to various stimuli including virus infections. In this work, we demonstrate that lytic infection by varicella-zoster virus ... [more ▼]

Apoptosis is an active mechanism of cell death which can be initiated in response to various stimuli including virus infections. In this work, we demonstrate that lytic infection by varicella-zoster virus (VZV), a human herpesvirus, is characterized by nuclear fragmentation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments and by chromatin condensation. In vitro, VZV-induced cell death is actually mediated by apoptosis. The mechanisms developed by cells to protect themselves against apoptosis could be one of the parameters allowing the establishment of virus latency. In the case of VZV, which can remain latent in sensory ganglia, we have not yet identified a cellular or viral protein which could play this protective role, since the observed apoptosis mechanism seems to be independent from Bcl-2, the most frequently described inhibitor of apoptosis. [less ▲]

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See detailLocalization of varicella-zoster virus nucleic acids and proteins in human skin.
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Neurology (1995), 45(12 Suppl 8), 47-9

The pathogenic mechanisms involved in varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections remain elusive. The pattern of cutaneous distribution of the IE63 protein and of the gpI (gE) and gpII glycoproteins with ... [more ▼]

The pathogenic mechanisms involved in varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections remain elusive. The pattern of cutaneous distribution of the IE63 protein and of the gpI (gE) and gpII glycoproteins with their corresponding genome sequences during VZV infections was studied by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients with varicella, herpes zoster, or atypical VZV lesions. The first evidence for VZV infection consisted of the presence of IE63 in keratinocytes. In the vesicles and pustules, the viral transcripts gpI, gpII, and IE63 and the corresponding nucleic acids for gpI and gpII were identified in keratinocytes, sebocytes, Langerhans cells, dermal dendrocytes, monocytes/macrophages, and endothelial cells. The gpI and gpII glycorpoteins were essentially located on the cellular membranes while IE63 expression was generally restricted to the nuclei. In three biopsies of early herpes zoster, viral proteins were disclosed in dermal nerves and in perineurial type I dendrocytes. This was never encountered in varicella. Vasculitic changes and endothelial cell involvement were more prominent in varicella than in herpes zoster. It is concluded that the secondary viremia in varicella that affects the dermal endothelial cells is followed by a cell-to-cell spread to keratinocytes. In herpes zoster, the viral progression through cutaneous nerves primarily extends to the pilosebaceous units with a secondary involvement of epidermal keratinocytes, followed by a further spread to dermal cells. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunohistochemical identification of varicella-zoster virus gene 63-encoded protein (IE63) and late (gE) protein on smears and cutaneous biopsies: implications for diagnostic use.
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Medical Virology (1995), 47(4), 342-7

Early and specific recognition of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection is of vital concern in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of histochemical ... [more ▼]

Early and specific recognition of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection is of vital concern in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of histochemical and immunohistochemical identification of the VZV ORF63 encoded protein (IE63) and of the VZV late protein gE on smears and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded skin sections taken from lesions clinically diagnosed as varicella (n = 15) and herpes zoster (n = 51). Microscopic examinations of Tzanck smears and skin sections yielded a diagnostic accuracy of Herpesviridae infections in 66.7% (10/15) and 92.3% (12/13) of varicella, and 74.4% (29/39) and 87.8% (43/49) of herpes zoster, respectively. Immunohistochemistry applied to varicella provided a type-specific virus diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (13/15; IE63) and 100% (15/15; gE) on smears, and of 92.3% for both VZV proteins on skin sections. In herpes zoster, the diagnostic accuracy of immunohistochemistry reached 92.3% (36/39; IE63) and 94.9% (37/39; gE) on smears, and 91.7% (44/48; IE63) and 91.8% (45/49; gE) on skin sections. These findings indicate that the immunohistochemical detection of IE63 and gE on both smears and skin sections yields a higher specificity and sensitivity than standard microscopic assessments. [less ▲]

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See detailViral glycoproteins in herpesviridae granulomas
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Delvenne, Philippe ULg et al

in American Journal of Dermatopathology (1994), 16(6), 588-592

Granulomatous reactions after varicella zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare, and their pathogenesis remains unclear. We studied by immunohistochemistry and in situ ... [more ▼]

Granulomatous reactions after varicella zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are rare, and their pathogenesis remains unclear. We studied by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization early granulomatous reactions after VZV and HSV infections. In the five cases studied, the VZV glycoproteins gp I and gp II were present in cells abutted to altered vessels, but the corresponding genome sequences were disclosed in similar locations in only one of these cases. In an immunocompromised patient with diffuse HSV eruption, HSV I antigens were present in cells of the reticular dermis, while viral nucleic acids were not evident. Immunophenotyping of the granulomas showed strong Mac 387 and CD68 positive labelings of macrophages/monocytes, without any involvement of Factor XIIIa-positive cells. These findings suggest that the major viral envelope glycoproteins, rather than complete viral particles could trigger granuloma formation following HSV and VZV skin infections. [less ▲]

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See detailMeningoradiculoneuritis due to acyclovir-resistant varicella zoster virus in an acquired immune deficiency syndrome patient
Snoeck, R.; Gérard, M.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Journal of Medical Virology (1994), 42(4), 338-347

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is recognized as one of the major viral pathogens reactivated in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report the case of meningoradiculoneuritis in ... [more ▼]

Varicella zoster virus (VZV) is recognized as one of the major viral pathogens reactivated in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). We report the case of meningoradiculoneuritis in an AIDS patient, associated with the isolation in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a thymidine kinase (TK)-deficient, acyclovir (ACV)-resistant strain of VZV. Although the virus was sensitive in vitro to phosphonoformate (PFA), the patient did not improve during PFA therapy and finally died. Several VZV strains isolated from this patient (including two isolates from the patient's CSF) were analyzed for their TK activity and subsequently the viral TK gene was sequenced showing a major deletion leading to a truncated protein. Their susceptibility to several antiviral agents including ACV, PFA, (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (BVDU), 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (vidarabine), (S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl) cytosine (HPMPC), and (S)-9-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)adenine (HPMPA) was evaluated. All the virus strains isolated from this patient remained sensitive to HPMPA and HPMPC, pointing to the potential usefulness of these acyclic nucleoside phosphonates for the treatment of ACV-resistant VZV infections in immunocompromised patients. (C) 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailSuccessful treatment of progressive mucocutaneous infection due to acyclovir- and foscarnet-resistant herpes simplex virus with (S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine (HPMPC).
Snoeck, R.; Andrei, G.; Gerard, Marie-Christine ULg et al

in Clinical Infectious Diseases : An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (1994), 18(4), 570-8

The acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine (HPMPC) was used topically for the treatment of persistent mucocutaneous infections in two cases. One patient with ... [more ▼]

The acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)cytosine (HPMPC) was used topically for the treatment of persistent mucocutaneous infections in two cases. One patient with AIDS suffered from a perineal lesion due to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and did not respond to acyclovir and was intolerant of foscarnet. A bone marrow transplant recipient developed orofacial lesions due to infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) that failed to respond to therapy with both acyclovir and foscarnet. After topical application of HPMPC, the HSV-2 lesions completely resolved. However, the lesions recurred 3 weeks later, and, upon subsequent treatment with HPMPC, regressed. On recurrence, the virus was found to be sensitive to acyclovir, which the patient was given. Again HSV-2, which was resistant to acyclovir, emerged; similar observations were made after another cycle of HPMPC therapy. The HSV-1 isolates were resistant to acyclovir and foscarnet. Following local HPMPC treatment, the lesions regressed, but after 1 week, a second course of topical HPMPC therapy had to be instituted for recurrent infection. The lesions again regressed, and as the recurrent virus was sensitive to acyclovir, the patient was successfully treated with the drug. The results of this study point to the potential usefulness of topical HPMPC in the treatment of immunocompromised patients with HSV-related mucocutaneous infections that are refractory to therapy with acyclovir and/or foscarnet. [less ▲]

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See detailVaricelle létale. Etude immunohistochimique et par hybridation in situ
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Delvenne, Philippe ULg; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Annales de Dermatologie et de Vénéréologie (1994), 121(2), 113-117

We report a case of lethal varicella developed in an immunocompromised man in his seventies. A study by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization was conducted revealing the presence of the ... [more ▼]

We report a case of lethal varicella developed in an immunocompromised man in his seventies. A study by immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization was conducted revealing the presence of the glycoprotein gpI specific for VZV and its corresponding nucleic acids found in multiple foci of most tissues and organs, except in the brain and paravertebral sympathetic ganglia. [less ▲]

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See detailCausative role of VZV in two fatal disseminated infections
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

Conference (1994)

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See detailCharacterization of an in vivo model of VZV latency in the nervous system
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg; Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S. et al

Conference (1994)

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See detailImmunohistochemical detection of immediate early and late phase proteins expressed during the varicella-zoster virus cycle
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in British Journal of Dermatology. Supplement (1994), 131(44), 64

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See detailIn vivo and in vitro models of Varicella zoster virus infection
Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg

Scientific conference (1994)

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See detailComparative immunohistochemical study of herpes-simplex and varicella-zoster infections
Nikkels, Arjen ULg; Debrus, S.; Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine ULg et al

in Virchows Archiv. A : Pathological Anatomy and Histopathology (1993), 422(2), 121-126

Herpes simplex (HSV) and varicella-zoster (VZV) skin infections share so many histological similarities that distinguishing between them may prove to be impossible. We developed and characterized a new ... [more ▼]

Herpes simplex (HSV) and varicella-zoster (VZV) skin infections share so many histological similarities that distinguishing between them may prove to be impossible. We developed and characterized a new monoclonal antibody, VL8, IgG kappa isotype, directed to the VZV envelope glycoprotein gpI. Immunohistochemistry with VL8 appeared highly sensitive and specific on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies and a clear-cut distinction between HSV and VZV infections was possible. The pattern of VL8 immunolabelling in VZV infections was strikingly different from that found in HSV infections studied with polyclonal antibodies to HSV I and II. Double immunolabelling revealed the VL8 positivity of sebaceous cells, endothelial cells, Mac 387-and CD68-positive monocyte-macrophages, and factor XIIIa-positive perivascular, perineural and interstitial dendrocytes. Intracytoplasmic VL8 labelling of endothelial cells and perivascular dendrocytes was found at the site of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. [less ▲]

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