References of "SCHEEN, André"
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See detailRoles of circadian rhythmicity and sleep in human glucose regulation.
Van Cauter, E.; Polonsky, K. S.; Scheen, André ULg

in Endocrine Reviews (1997), 18(5), 716-38

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See detailDetermination rapide par immunodosage de l'hemoglobine glyquee sur sang capillaire comparee a une methode d'affinite pour le boronate et capture d'ions sur sang veineux.
Bozet, Marie-Claire ULg; Gerard, Pascale ULg; Scheen, André ULg et al

in Annales de Biologie Clinique (1997), 55(2), 139-44

Measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin has become an essential tool in the management of diabetic patients. A recently developed device allows the rapid immuno-assay of HbA1c in 1 microliter capillary ... [more ▼]

Measurement of glycosylated haemoglobin has become an essential tool in the management of diabetic patients. A recently developed device allows the rapid immuno-assay of HbA1c in 1 microliter capillary blood obtained by a finger prick. In 100 ambulatory diabetic patients, we compared the results obtained with this method to those obtained in venous blood using a standard affinity chromatography laboratory method. Although both methods correlated (r = 0.88, p < 0.001), the mean +/- SD levels respectively obtained differed slightly (7.6 +/- 1.5 vs 79 +/- 1.4% p < 0.001). The 95% confidence interval of the difference was [-0.41. -0.14]. Considering a cut-off HbA1c value of 8%, as indicative of the need for treatment adjustment, 33 patients with the capillary blood immuno-assay method and 42 with the venous-blood affinity chromatography method were above that limit (Mc Nemar test, p < 0.05). In conclusion, the rapid assay of HbA1c in capillary blood can be useful for the management of some diabetic patients but the results are not readily exchangeable with those obtained from other standardized laboratory methods. Consequently, specific ranges and clinical decision limits must be determined. [less ▲]

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See detailDrug treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in the 1990s. Achievements and future developments.
Scheen, André ULg

in Drugs (1997), 54(3), 355-68

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, type 2 diabetes) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. There are various ... [more ▼]

Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, type 2 diabetes) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. There are various pharmacological approaches to improving glucose homeostasis, but those currently used in clinical practice either do not succeed in restoring normoglycaemia in most patients or fail after a variable period of time. For glycaemic regulation, 4 classes of drugs are currently available: sulphonylureas, biguanides (metformin), alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose) and insulin, each of which has a different mode and site of action. These standard pharmacological treatments may be used individually for certain types of patients, or may be combined in a stepwise fashion to provide more ideal glycaemic control for most patients. Adjunct treatments comprise a few pharmacological approaches which may help to improve glycaemic control by correcting some abnormalities frequently associated with NIDDM, such as obesity (serotoninergic anorectic agents) and hyperlipidaemia (benfluorex). There is intensive pharmaceutical research to find new drugs able to stimulate insulin secretion (new sulphonylurea or nonsulphonylurea derivatives, glucagon-like peptide-1), improve insulin action (thiazolidinediones, lipid interfering agents, glucagon antagonists, vanadium compounds) or reduce carbohydrate absorption (miglitol, amylin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1). Further studies should demonstrate the superiority of these new compounds over the standard antidiabetic agents as well as their optimal mode of administration, alone or in combination with currently available drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma leptin levels, insulin secretion, clearance and action on glucose metabolism in anorexia nervosa.
Letiexhe, Michel ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Eating and Weight Disorders [=EWD] (1997), 2(2), 79-86

From a metabolic point of view, anorexia nervosa may be viewed as a mirror image of obesity. We compared insulin secretion, clearance and action on glucose metabolism during an intravenous glucose ... [more ▼]

From a metabolic point of view, anorexia nervosa may be viewed as a mirror image of obesity. We compared insulin secretion, clearance and action on glucose metabolism during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in nine women with anorexia nervosa and in nine age-matched normal-weight controls. Insulin secretion (ISR) was derived by deconvolution of plasma C-peptide levels, insulin clearance (MCR(I)) was obtained by dividing the area under the curve (AUC(0-180 min)) of ISR by the corresponding AUC of plasma insulin levels, insulin sensitivity (S(I)) and glucose effectiveness index (S(G)) were calculated by Bergman's minimal model. The anorectic women had markedly lower BMI values (13.7+/-0.6 vs 23.2+/-0.8 kg/m2, p<0.0001) and serum basal leptin levels (2.8+/-0.6 vs 8.9+/-1.8 ng/mL, p=0.005) than control women. The anorectic women exhibited clear-cut lower fasting and post-glucose plasma insulin levels but similar corresponding plasma C-peptide concentrations when compared to controls. Consequently, ISR was similar in both groups while MCR(I) was significantly increased in anorexia nervosa (MCR(I): 3320+/-881 vs 822+/-79 mL x min(-1) x m(-2), p<0.02). The index S(I) tended to be higher in anorectic women than in normal-weight subjects, but without reaching the level of statistical significance because of a high between-subject variability (20.2+/-5.7 vs 12.5+/-2.2 10(-5) x min(-1)/pmol x L(-1), NS). The index S(G) was similar in both groups (0.022+/-0.004 vs 0.018+/-0.002 min(-1), NS). In conclusion, low plasma insulin levels observed in women with anorexia nervosa result from high MCR(I) rather than from depressed insulin secretion. Insulin sensitivity is not systematically increased and glucose effectiveness is unchanged in anorectic women when compared to normal-weight controls. [less ▲]

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See detailPharma-clinics. Comment je traite... un patient diabétique de type 1 par pompe portable à insuline
Philips, J. C.; Scheen, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1996), 51(11), 678-80

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See detailEffects of Ingested Fructose and Infused Glucagon on Endogenous Glucose Production in Obese Niddm Patients, Obese Non-Diabetic Subjects, and Healthy Subjects
Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Schneiter, P.; Jequier, E. et al

in Diabetologia (1996), 39(5), 580-6

Increased endogenous glucose production (EGP) and gluconeogenesis contribute to the pathogenesis of hyperglycaemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). In healthy subjects, however, EGP ... [more ▼]

Increased endogenous glucose production (EGP) and gluconeogenesis contribute to the pathogenesis of hyperglycaemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). In healthy subjects, however, EGP remains constant during administration of gluconeogenic precursors. This study was performed in order to determine whether administration of fructose increases EGP in obese NIDDM patients and obese non-diabetic subjects. Eight young healthy lean subjects, eight middle-aged obese NIDDM patients and seven middle-aged obese non-diabetic subjects were studied during hourly ingestion of 13C fructose (0.3 g.kg fat free mass-1.h-1) for 3 h. Fructose failed to increase EGP (measured with 6,6 2H glucose) in NIDDM (17.7 +/- 1.9 mumol.kg fat free mass-1.min-1 basal vs 15.9 +/- 0.9 after fructose), in obese non-diabetic subjects (12.1 +/- 0.5 basal vs 13.1 +/- 0.5 after fructose) and in lean healthy subjects (13.3 +/- 0.5 basal vs 13.8 +/- 0.6 after fructose) although 13C glucose synthesis contributed 73.2% of EGP in lean subjects, 62.6% in obese non-diabetic subjects, and 52.8% in obese NIDDM patients. Since glucagon may play an important role in the development of hyperglycaemia in NIDDM, healthy subjects were also studied during 13C fructose ingestion + hyperglucagonaemia (232 +/- 9 ng/l) and during hyperglucagonaemia alone. EGP increased by 19.8% with ingestion of fructose + glucagon (p < 0.05) but remained unchanged during administration of fructose or glucagon alone. The plasma 13C glucose enrichment was identical after fructose ingestion both with and without glucagon, indicating that the contribution of fructose gluconeogenesis to the glucose 6-phosphate pool was identical in these two conditions. We concluded that during fructose administration: 1) gluconeogenesis is increased, but EGP remains constant in NIDDM, obese non-diabetic, and lean individuals; 2) in lean individuals, both an increased glucagonaemia and an enhanced supply of gluconeogenic precursors are required to increase EGP; this increase in EGP occurs without changes in the relative proportion of glucose 6-phosphate production from fructose and from other sources (i.e. glycogenolysis + gluconeogenesis from non-fructose precursors). [less ▲]

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See detailNeutralization of TNF-a in obese insulin-resistant human subjects: no effect on insulin sensitivity
SCHEEN, André ULg; Castillo, M.; PAQUOT, Nicolas ULg et al

in Diabetes (1996), 45(suppl 2), 286

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See detailExhaustion of blood glucose response and enhancement of insulin response after repeated glucagon injections in type-2 diabetes: potentiation by progressive hyperglycemia.
Castillo, M. J.; Scheen, André ULg; Paolisso, G. et al

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1996), 57(5), 395-402

AIMS: To investigate the hyperglycemic and insulinemic response to repeated glucagon injections in Type-2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. METHODS: In overnight fasted Type-2 diabetic patients ... [more ▼]

AIMS: To investigate the hyperglycemic and insulinemic response to repeated glucagon injections in Type-2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. METHODS: In overnight fasted Type-2 diabetic patients, three i.v. glucagon (1 mg) injections were given as a bolus at two-hour intervals. In the hour preceding each glucagon injection, 6 patients received saline and they were tested at near-baseline blood glucose levels, while 8 patients received a glucose-controlled glucose infusion and they were tested at increasing blood glucose levels (7.5 +/- 0.2, 12.9 +/- 0.5 and 18.7 +/- 0.7 mmol/l). Blood samples were collected at 0, 3, 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 min after each glucagon injection. RESULTS: In the patients tested at near-baseline blood glucose levels, the blood glucose rise induced by glucagon was smaller after repeated injections. By contrast, the B-cell response to glucagon was well preserved. In the patients tested at increasing blood glucose levels, the blood glucose response to glucagon was abolished after repeated injections. By contrast, the B-cell response was significantly potentiated. The respective areas under the curve of plasma insulin levels in response to glucagon were 563 +/- 72, 1047 +/- 154 and 1844 +/- 305 m U x 30 min/l (p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In Type-2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients, repeated glucagon injections, even when administered in a short (4 h) period of time, do not exhaust the B-cell. Endogenous insulin secretion is even potentiated at increasing blood glucose levels. By contrast, the hyperglycemic response to glucagon is significantly abolished, particularly at high blood glucose levels. [less ▲]

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See detailLessons from the discovery of leptin: is obesity an endocrine disease?
Scheen, André ULg

in Acta Clinica Belgica (1996), 51(6), 371-6

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See detailThe degree/rapidity of the metabolic deterioration following interruption of a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is influenced by the prevailing blood glucose Level.
Castillo, M. J.; Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism (1996), 81(5), 1975-8

This study aims at investigating the influence of the prevailing blood glucose level on the metabolic deterioration that follows a nocturnal interruption of a continuous sc insulin infusion (CSII ... [more ▼]

This study aims at investigating the influence of the prevailing blood glucose level on the metabolic deterioration that follows a nocturnal interruption of a continuous sc insulin infusion (CSII). Fifteen CSII-treated, C-peptide negative, diabetic patients have been studied CSII was interrupted from 2300 h to 0500 h. Blood was collected hourly from 2200 h to 0600 h. According to blood glucose (BG) levels at 2300 h, patients were classified as hypoglycemic (BG between 1.5 and 2.5 mmol/L, n = 5), normoglycemic (BG between 4.0 and 8.0 mmol/L, n = 5), or hyperglycemic (BG between 9.0 and 15.0 mmol/L, n = 5). At 2300 h, BG (mean +/- SEM) was 1.9 +/- 0.1, 6.2 +/- 0.7 and 11.2 +/- 1.0 mmol/L, respectively. After 6 h of CSII interruption, BG increased to 13.5 +/- 1.3, 14.1 +/- 1.2, and 19.4 +/- 1.2 mmol/L, respectively. At 2300 h, plasma 3-OH-butyrate levels were similar in the three groups (around 150 micromol/L). At 0500 h, significantly higher values were obtained for hyperglycemic (1460 +/- 127 micromol/L) than for normoglycemic (868 +/- 150 micromol/L) or hypoglycemic (837 +/- 80 micromol/L) patients. Enhanced lipolysis in initially hyperglycemic patients may contribute to accelerated ketogenesis and metabolic degradation. In conclusion, the metabolic deterioration that follows CSII interruption is influenced by the initial metabolic situation. Hypoglycemic patients deteriorate more rapidly, and hyperglycemic patients suffer a more important degradation. The latter are prone to rapid ketoacidosis if accidental CSII interruption occurs. [less ▲]

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See detailAlterations in the ultradian oscillations of insulin secretion and plasma glucose in aging.
Scheen, André ULg; Sturis, J.; Polonsky, K. S. et al

in Diabetologia (1996), 39(5), 564-72

Normal insulin secretion includes oscillations with a period length of 80-150 min which are tightly coupled to glucose oscillations of similar period. To determine whether normal aging is associated with ... [more ▼]

Normal insulin secretion includes oscillations with a period length of 80-150 min which are tightly coupled to glucose oscillations of similar period. To determine whether normal aging is associated with alterations in these ultradian oscillations, eight, modestly overweight, older men (65 +/- 5 years) and eight weight-matched young control subjects (25 +/- 4 years) were studied during 53 h of constant glucose infusion. Blood samples were collected every 20 min and insulin secretion rates were calculated by deconvolution. Ultradian oscillations of glucose and insulin secretion were evident in both groups. Pulse frequency was similar for glucose and insulin secretion, and was not affected by age. The absolute amplitude of the glucose oscillations was similar in both groups but their relative amplitude was slightly dampened in the older adults. Both the absolute and the relative amplitudes of insulin secretory oscillations were markedly reduced in the older subjects. The normal linear increase in the amplitude of insulin oscillations occurring with increasing amplitudes of glucose oscillations was still present in the older adults but analysis of covariance indicated that the slope was significantly lower than in the young control subjects (p < 0.0005), reflecting a decreased responsiveness of the beta cell to glucose changes. The temporal concordance between insulin and glucose oscillations, as estimated by pulse concomitancy and cross-correlation, was also lower in older subjects. The similarities between the alterations in the ultradian oscillations of insulin secretion and glucose in older healthy adults and those occurring in diabetic patients suggest that an impairment of beta-cell function may play a primary role in the deterioration of glucose tolerance in aging. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical pharmacokinetics of metformin.
Scheen, André ULg

in Clinical Pharmacokinetics (1996), 30(5), 359-71

The biguanide metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an oral antihyperglycaemic agent widely used in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Considerable renewal of interest in this ... [more ▼]

The biguanide metformin (dimethylbiguanide) is an oral antihyperglycaemic agent widely used in the management of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Considerable renewal of interest in this drug has been observed in recent years. Metformin can be determined in biological fluids by various methods, mainly using high performance liquid chromatography, which allows pharmacokinetic studies in healthy volunteers and diabetic patients. Metformin disposition is apparently unaffected by the presence of diabetes and only slightly affected by the use of different oral formulations. Metformin has an absolute oral bioavailability of 40 to 60%, and gastrointestinal absorption is apparently complete within 6 hours of ingestion. An inverse relationship was observed between the dose ingested and the relative absorption with therapeutic doses ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 g, suggesting the involvement of an active, saturable absorption process. Metformin is rapidly distributed following absorption and does not bind to plasma proteins. No metabolites or conjugates of metformin have been identified. The absence of liver metabolism clearly differentiates the pharmacokinetics of metformin from that of other biguanides, such as phenformin. Metformin undergoes renal excretion and has a mean plasma elimination half-life after oral administration of between 4.0 and 8.7 hours. This elimination is prolonged in patients with renal impairment and correlates with creatinine clearance. There are only scarce data on the relationship between plasma metformin concentrations and metabolic effects. Therapeutic levels may be 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L in the fasting state and 1 to 2 mg/L after a meal, but monitoring has little clinical value except when lactic acidosis is suspected or present. Indeed, when lactic acidosis occurs in metformin-treated patients, early determination of the metformin plasma concentration appears to be the best criterion for assessing the involvement of the drug in this acute condition. After confirmation of the diagnosis, treatment should rapidly involve forced diuresis or haemodialysis, both of which favour rapid elimination of the drug. Although serious, lactic acidosis due to metformin is rare and may be minimised by strict adherence to prescribing guidelines and contraindications, particularly the presence of renal failure. Finally, only very few drug interactions have been described with metformin in healthy volunteers. Plasma levels may be reduced by guar gum and alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and increased by cimetidine, but no data are yet available in the diabetic population. [less ▲]

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See detailChanges in breath 13CO2/12CO2 during exercise of different intensities.
Gautier, J. F.; Pirnay, Freddy ULg; Lacroix, M. et al

in Journal of Applied Physiology (Bethesda, Md. : 1985) (1996), 81(3), 1096-102

The measurement of breath 13CO2/12CO2 is commonly used during exercise to evaluate the oxidation rate of exogenous carbohydrates enriched in 13C. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exercise ... [more ▼]

The measurement of breath 13CO2/12CO2 is commonly used during exercise to evaluate the oxidation rate of exogenous carbohydrates enriched in 13C. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exercise itself affects the 13C/12C ratio in expired air CO2 in relation to exercise intensity. The relative abundance of 13C and 12C in expired air CO2 was determined by isotoperatio mass spectrometry and expressed as delta 13C (in %o) by using Craig's formula and calibrated standards. Five healthy young men exercised on a treadmill after an overnight fast during > or = 105 min on four occasions and in a randomized order. Work rates were performed at approximately 30, 45, 60, and 75% of their maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Delta 13C in expired air CO2 and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were determined every 15 or 30 min during exercise. At 30 and 45% VO2max, a slight and not statistically significant increase in delta 13C was observed at 30 min. In contrast, at 60 75% VO2max, the rise was statistically significant and averaged 0.83 and 0.99%o, respectively. Average delta 13C (between 0 and 105 min) progressively increased with the intensity of exercise. Individual values of delta 13C and RER were positively correlated (r = 0.653, P = 0.002) as were values of delta 13C and endogenous carbohydrates utilized (r = 0.752, P < 0.001). Factitious or "pseudooxidation" of a 13C-enriched exogenous glucose load (indeed noningested) was calculated from the changes in expired air delta 13C. Over the whole period of exercise it was not statistically significant at 30 and 40% VO2max. However, over the first 60 min of exercise, such pseudooxidation of exogenous glucose was significant at 30 and 45% VO2max. In conclusion, by modifying the mix of endogenous substrates oxidized, exercise at 60% VO2max and above significantly increases the 13C/12C ratio in expired air CO2. At these intensities, this could lead to overestimation of the oxidation of 13C-labeled substrates given orally. At lower intensities of exercise, such overestimation is much smaller an affects mainly the values recorded during the initial part of the exercise bout. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of residual insulin secretion in diabetic patients using the intravenous glucagon stimulatory test: methodological aspects and clinical applications.
Scheen, André ULg; Castillo, M. J.; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (1996), 22(6), 397-406

Defective insulin secretion plays a crucial role in insulin-dependent (Type 1) and non-insulin-dependent (Type 2) diabetes mellitus as well as in many secondary forms of the disease. Glucagon is a potent ... [more ▼]

Defective insulin secretion plays a crucial role in insulin-dependent (Type 1) and non-insulin-dependent (Type 2) diabetes mellitus as well as in many secondary forms of the disease. Glucagon is a potent stimulus for the islet beta-cell, and intravenous bolus injection of 1 mg glucagon has been widely used to assess endogenous insulin secretion for clinical or research purposes. Plasma C-peptide levels (less commonly insulin) are usually measured immediately before and 6 min after glucagon injection. The C-peptide response to glucagon is well-correlated with the beta-cell response to mixed meals or other stimuli commonly used to characterize endogenous insulin secretion (oral or intravenous glucose, standard meals, arginine, etc.) and has the advantage of shorter duration and simple standardization. The glucagon test shows good intra-subject reproducibility, although in diabetic patients it may be influenced by variable prevailing blood glucose levels. Several applications of the glucagon test have been developed. In Type 1 diabetes, the glucagon test has been used to discriminate between patients with and without residual insulin secretion. This can be especially important during the first few months, or even years, following initiation of insulin therapy when attempts to stop the immunological destruction of the beta-cell are made. Assessment of endogenous insulin secretion is also important after pancreas or islet transplantation. In patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus, in which residual endogenous insulin secretion is common, characterization of the disease may help in the choice of therapy for the individual patient (insulin, sulphonylureas or combined therapy). Thus, the glucagon test is a simple, reliable and useful tool for clinical evaluation of diabetes mellitus. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between sleep quality and glucose regulation in normal humans.
Scheen, André ULg; Byrne, M. M.; Plat, L. et al

in American Journal of Physiology (1996), 271(2 Pt 1), 261-70

To define the effects of sleep on glucose regulation, we analyzed plasma glucose levels, insulin secretion rates (ISR), and plasma growth hormone and cortisol levels in normal subjects receiving a ... [more ▼]

To define the effects of sleep on glucose regulation, we analyzed plasma glucose levels, insulin secretion rates (ISR), and plasma growth hormone and cortisol levels in normal subjects receiving a constant glucose infusion during nocturnal sleep, nocturnal sleep deprivation, and daytime recovery sleep. Plasma glucose and ISR markedly increased during early nocturnal sleep and returned to presleep levels during late sleep. These changes in glucose and ISR appeared to reflect the predominance of slow-wave (SW) stages in early sleep and of rapid-eye-movement and wake stages in late sleep. Major differences in glucose and ISR profiles were observed during sleep deprivation as glucose and ISR remained essentially stable during the first part of the night and then decreased significantly, despite the persistence of bed rest and constant glucose infusion. During daytime recovery sleep, SW stages were increased, glucose levels peaked earlier than during nocturnal sleep, and the decreases of glucose and ISR in late sleep were reduced by one-half. Thus sleep has important effects on brain and tissue glucose utilization, suggesting that sleep disturbances may adversely affect glucose tolerance. [less ▲]

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See detailUsefulness of fluoxetine in obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics: a multicenter study.
Daubresse, Jean-Claude; Kolanowski, J.; Krzentowski, G. et al

in Obesity Research (1996), 4(4), 391-6

Weight reduction is essential in the management of most non-insulin-dependent diabetics, but this therapeutical goal is difficult to obtain. In this double-blind parallel study, 82 non-insulin-dependent ... [more ▼]

Weight reduction is essential in the management of most non-insulin-dependent diabetics, but this therapeutical goal is difficult to obtain. In this double-blind parallel study, 82 non-insulin-dependent diabetics, moderately obese (BMI = 30 - 39 kg/m2), were given for an 8-week period either placebo (P) or fluoxetine (F), a specific serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in addition to their usual antidiabetic treatment. Thirty-nine of them received 60 mg fluoxetine a day and 43 were given the placebo. At admission, both groups had similar weight excess, metabolic control and serum lipid values. In comparison with the P-treated subjects, those treated with fluoxetine (F) lost more weight after 3 weeks (-1.9 vs. -0.7 kg, p < -0.0009) and after 8 weeks (-3.1 vs. -0.9 kg, p < 0.0007). Fasting blood glucose decreased in group F after 3 weeks (-1.5 vs -0.4 mmol/L, p < 0.003) and after 8 weeks (-1.7 vs. -0.02 mmol/L, p < 0.0004). HbAlc decreased from 8.5% to 7.7% in group F and from 8.6% to 8.3% in group P (p = 0.057). Mean triglyceride level was also reduced in group F after 8 weeks (p = 0.042). Fasting C-peptide did not change in either group, but fasting insulin values decreased in group F after 3 weeks (p < 0.02) and after 8 weeks (p < 0.05). The insulin/C-peptide molar ratio decreased significantly in group F after 3 weeks (p < 0.04) and after 8 weeks (p < 0.05) in comparison with group P. The drug was generally well tolerated and no major side effects were reported. In conclusion, the addition of fluoxetine to the usual oral hypoglycemic agent therapy might be beneficial in obese non-insulin-dependent diabetics, at least on a short-term basis. [less ▲]

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See detailLe diabete non insulinodependant: de la physiopathologie au traitement.
Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Bulletin et Mémoires de l'Académie Royale de Médecine de Belgique (1996), 151(7-9), 395-402402-5

Non-insulin-dependent (or type 2) diabetes mellitus is a common, underdiagnosed and growing disease in our society. It is responsible for increased morbidity and mortality and represents an important ... [more ▼]

Non-insulin-dependent (or type 2) diabetes mellitus is a common, underdiagnosed and growing disease in our society. It is responsible for increased morbidity and mortality and represents an important public health problem. This polygenic disease is often expressed late in life and its evolution is accelerated by environmental factors leading to obesity. It combines defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action, and such defects are present in various proportions according to the type of patient and the stage of the disease. Diet and physical activity recommendations are the basis of the treatment. Current pharmacological approaches aim at improving insulin secretion and/or insulin cellular action. After secondary failure to oral drugs, insulin therapy should be initiated, the patient becoming "insulin-requiring". A synergy should be searched in the combination of various therapeutic modalities in order to improve the glycaemic control. [less ▲]

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See detailMise au point medicale avant gastroplastie: indications et contre-indications.
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Bruxelles (1996), 17(4), 232-5

Because of the common failure of the various medical procedures used for the treatment of morbid obesity, surgeons have searched alternatives among which gastroplasty appears to offer now the best ... [more ▼]

Because of the common failure of the various medical procedures used for the treatment of morbid obesity, surgeons have searched alternatives among which gastroplasty appears to offer now the best efficacy/safety ratio. Such approach has become more and more popular in our country, but success is almost highly variable from patient to patient. A careful medical assessment is necessary before performing gastroplasty. It mainly aims at choosing the appropriate indications (failure of previous well-applied medical therapy, exclusion of any hormonal cause of obesity, presence of complications due to weight excess, ...) and at excluding cardiovascular (unstable coronaropathy, carotid stenosis, ...), digestive (recurrent oesophagitis, ...) or psychiatric contra-indications. Such medical assessment before gastroplasty should allow to increase the success rate and to reduce the incidence of complications after the surgical procedure. [less ▲]

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