References of "SCHEEN, André"
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See detailLa diabete de type 2: approaches diagnostiques, objectifs glycemiques et strategies therapeutiques.
Scheen, André ULg; Paquot, Nicolas ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1999), 54(8), 659-66

Type 2 diabetes is a prevalent disease, with high morbidity and mortality rates, which is usually managed by general practitioners. We will discuss the new diagnostic approaches, the glycaemic goals and ... [more ▼]

Type 2 diabetes is a prevalent disease, with high morbidity and mortality rates, which is usually managed by general practitioners. We will discuss the new diagnostic approaches, the glycaemic goals and the therapeutic strategies which may contribute to improve both adequate management and prognosis of diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes. As far as possible, the management should be both individualized and integrated, not only focused on blood glucose control but also on the correction of other vascular risk factors frequently associated with diabetes (mainly arterial hypertension and dyslipidaemias). Obviously, the reduction of the incidence and severity of microangiopathy and macroangiopathy diabetic complications would require a tight collaboration between general practitioners and specialized physicians. [less ▲]

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See detailMedical aspects of obesity.
Scheen, André ULg; Luyckx, Françoise ULg

in Acta Chirurgica Belgica (1999), 99(3), 135-9

Obesity poses a serious health hazard and its treatment is often disappointing. Major advances have been made during recent years in the understanding of body weight regulation, with the discovery of ... [more ▼]

Obesity poses a serious health hazard and its treatment is often disappointing. Major advances have been made during recent years in the understanding of body weight regulation, with the discovery of leptin, a protein produced by adipocytes and acting on the central nervous system to reduce food intake, and that of beta-3 adrenergic receptors and uncoupling proteins which contribute to stimulate energy expenditure. Numerous metabolic complications are associated with abdominal obesity and most of them, such as diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemias and arterial hypertension, appear to be linked to insulin resistance and may be part of the socalled metabolic syndrome or syndrome X. While very-low-calorie diets are usually effective in the short-term, they cannot, in the long-term and for most patients, solve the problem of severe obesity. Pharmacological antiobesity treatment may include drugs that reduce food intake, drugs that increase energy expenditure and drugs that affect nutrient partitioning or metabolism. All of these pharmacological approaches have potential efficacy, but unfortunately serious limitations. This is also the case of mechanical means, such as intragastric balloons. Consequently, bariatric surgery may be considered as a valuable alternative therapy in well-selected patients with morbid obesity refractory to classical treatments. In conclusion, obesity is a chronic disease and should be treated as such with reasonable expectations. [less ▲]

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See detailComment apprecier chez l'homme l'action de l'insuline en recherche et en pratique.
Scheen, André ULg

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1999), 60(3), 179-87

Various methods have been proposed to assess insulin action in vivo, from the most complex to the simplest. All methods are based on the comparison of plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin, but can ... [more ▼]

Various methods have been proposed to assess insulin action in vivo, from the most complex to the simplest. All methods are based on the comparison of plasma concentrations of glucose and insulin, but can be differentiated by some important characteristics: evaluation in the basal state, after administration of exogenous insulin or after stimulation of insulin secretion; measurement in conditions of normo, hyper- or hypoglycaemia; and assessment using or not a modeling approach. For research purpose, the most informative techniques, such as the "euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp" or the intravenous glucose tolerance test combined with the minimal model approach, should be preferred. Easier tests may be used as alternative approaches, such as the fixed insulin-glucose infusion or the continuous infusion of glucose with model assessment (CIGMA). In daily practice, the clinician can often use simpler indices, such as fasting insulin concentrations, eventually analysed in comparison with corresponding glucose levels using the HOMA method. The only easy to perform dynamic maneuver is the short insulin tolerance test, but it is subject to several criticisms. As every approach for measuring insulin action has its own advantages and disadvantages, the selection essentially depends on studied populations (diabetic or not), primary objectives and, most importantly, available means. [less ▲]

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See detailInterets et limites de la diete proteique chez le patient obese diabetique de type 2.
Scheen, André ULg

in Annales d'Endocrinologie (1999), 60(6), 443-50

Weight excess plays a major role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes but only a minority of patients succeed in following a restrictive calorie diet in the long-term, able to reduce body weight and ... [more ▼]

Weight excess plays a major role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes but only a minority of patients succeed in following a restrictive calorie diet in the long-term, able to reduce body weight and maintain normoglycaemia. Very low-calorie diets such as protein diets rapidly reduce plasma glucose levels by various mechanisms, among which a significant improvement of hepatic and muscular insulin sensitivity and a partial recovery of insulin secretion. The rapidity of the hypoglycaemic action suggests that calorie restriction plays a more important role than weight loss itself. The lowering of plasma glucose levels imposes an early reduction in the doses of antidiabetic agents to avoid hypoglycaemia. Well-balanced protein diets are well tolerated, provided that they are restricted to a few weeks. The most important limitation of the protein diet is the risk of weight regain afterwards and such situation requires the maintenance of an hypocaloric diet in the long-term. Ideally, the protein diet should be integrated in a global approach including treatment of obesity, type 2 diabetes and frequently associated other risk factors. [less ▲]

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See detailPharmacological treatment of obesity: present status.
Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in International Journal of Obesity & Related Metabolic Disorders (1999), 23 Suppl 1

OBJECTIVE: Obesity poses a serious health hazard and its treatment is often disappointing. This review describes the present status of pharmacological treatment of obesity in man. DESIGN: Obesity ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Obesity poses a serious health hazard and its treatment is often disappointing. This review describes the present status of pharmacological treatment of obesity in man. DESIGN: Obesity treatment may include drugs that reduce food intake, drugs that increase energy expenditure and drugs that affect nutrient partitioning or metabolism. The mode of action, efficacy and safety of each approach will be briefly discussed. RESULTS: All of the pharmacological possibilities have potential activities, but also serious limitations. While current anti-obesity pharmacotherapy essentially uses centrally-acting anorectic drugs, severe side-effects (more particularly pulmonary hypertension and valvular heart disease) have been reported, leading to the withdrawal of licensed fenfluramine and d-fenfluramine. New approaches have been recently proposed, such as sibutramine, an amine reuptake inhibitor which decreases food intake, and orlistat, an intestinal lipase inhibitor which decreases fat absorption. Obesity is a chronic disease and should be treated as such with reasonable expectations. Large-scale one-year placebo-controlled studies demonstrated that d-fenfluramine, sibutramine and orlistat significantly increased body weight loss by an average of 2-4 kg when compared to placebo and, more interestingly, multiplied by 2-3 the number of patients who succeeded in obtaining and maintaining a reduction of more than 10% of initial body weight. Interestingly, some of these compounds may also exert favourable effects on other vascular risk factors, independently of weight loss. CONCLUSIONS: Even if all anti-obesity pharmacological approaches can be helpful, they also have important limitations so that other strategies including either combined therapies or new drugs (peptides) are currently under investigation. [less ▲]

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See detailAdverse effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiovascular risk profile in middle-aged belgian population
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; Scheen, André ULg; LEFEBVRE, Pierre ULg et al

Conference (1998, September 04)

Adverse effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiovascular risk profile in middle-aged belgian population A.Saint-Remy, A. Scheen, M. Jeanjean, P. Lefèbvre, G. Rorive Nephrology-Hypertension, University ... [more ▼]

Adverse effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiovascular risk profile in middle-aged belgian population A.Saint-Remy, A. Scheen, M. Jeanjean, P. Lefèbvre, G. Rorive Nephrology-Hypertension, University hospital, B35 sart Tilman, Liège, Belgium Objectives: assuming that insulin levels are reliable markers of insulin resistance, are increased fasting and/or postload insulinemia good predictors of an adverse cardiovascular risk profile in epidemiological studies? Method: in the MONICA project a random sample of 1631 subjects (35-64 years old) living in the province of Luxemburg, free of antihypertensive drugs and hypoglycemiant agents were submitted to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Blood samples for insulin (ins) and glucose were drawn at 0 and 2 hours, were available: total cholesterol (TC, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TG), blood pressure (BP), BMI. Individuals were classified in 2 groups according to their level of fasting and 2 h insulinemia being either lower (group 1) or higher (group 2) than the 90th percentile value of the distribution of insulinemia. Results: Comparisons between groups show that mean BP, BMI, glycemia, TC and TG are higher (p<0.0001) in group 2 while HDL-C is significantly lower. In group 2, hypertension is 2 times more frequent than in group 1. Same observations are made for obesity (4 times more), impaired glucose tolerance, diabetes (10 times), high TG (3 times) and low rate of HDL-C (4 times). Insulin levels correlate significantly with BP and lipids. In group 1, people are generally affected by no more than 1cv risk factor, whereas cumulation of 2-3 and more risk factors is significantly more frequent in group 2 where 8.4 % of individuals exhibit hypertension with obesity, diabetes and dyslipidemia. Comparisons between the group 1 and other groups characterized by increased either fasting or postload insulin strongly suggest that an isolated increase of fasting insulin is already associated with an adverse cv risk profile. Conclusions: Unquestionably the OGTT with measurement of fasting and 2 hours postload insulinemia allows, in population studies, to identify people with a significant increase of major cardiovascular risk factors when hypersinulinemia is diagnosed. Our results indicate that already fasting insulinemia level is a good predictor of our observations. [less ▲]

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See detailThe postprandial state and risk of cardiovascular disease.
Lefebvre, Pierre ULg; Scheen, André ULg

in Diabetic Medicine : A Journal of the British Diabetic Association (1998), 15 Suppl 4

Metabolism in man is regulated by complex hormonal signals and substrate interactions, and for many years the clinical focus has centred on the metabolic and hormonal picture after an overnight fast. More ... [more ▼]

Metabolism in man is regulated by complex hormonal signals and substrate interactions, and for many years the clinical focus has centred on the metabolic and hormonal picture after an overnight fast. More recently, the postprandial state, i.e. 'the period that comprises and follows a meal', has received more attention. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), although highly non-physiological, has been used largely as a model of the postprandial state. Epidemiological studies have shown that, when 'impaired', oral glucose tolerance is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Postprandial hyperlipidaemia has been investigated more recently in epidemiological, mechanistical and intervention studies, most of which indicate that high postprandial triglyceride levels, and particularly postprandial rich triglyceride remnants, constitute an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that excessive postprandial glucose excursions are accompanied by oxidative stress and, less well known, activation of blood coagulation (increase in circulating D-dimers and prothrombin fragments). The mechanisms through which increased postprandial glucose levels and lipid concentrations may damage endothelial cells on blood vessel walls appear to be complex. These mechanisms include the activation of protein kinase C, increased expression of adhesion molecules, increased adhesion and uptake of leucocytes, increased production of proliferative substances such as endothelin, increased proliferation of endothelial cells, increased synthesis of collagen IV and fibronectin, and decreased production of nitric oxide (NO). In conclusion, the 'postprandial state' cumulatively covers almost half of the nycthemeral period, and its physiology involves numerous finely regulated motor, secretory, hormonal and metabolic events. Epidemiological and mechanistical studies have suggested that perturbations of the postprandial state are involved in cardiovascular disease. Correcting the abnormalities of the postprandial state must form part of the strategy for the prevention and management of cardiovascular diseases, particularly those that are associated with diabetes mellitus. [less ▲]

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See detailComment j'explore ... la néphropathie diabétique. Deuxième partie: suivi de la filtration glomérulaire
Weekers, Laurent ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Godon, J. P.

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(9), 571-5

The natural history of diabetic renal disease can be divided into different stages according to the degree of albuminuria and the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Assessment of the early ... [more ▼]

The natural history of diabetic renal disease can be divided into different stages according to the degree of albuminuria and the level of glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Assessment of the early hyperfiltration state, as well as determination of the rate of decline in kidney function at a later stage require precise and accurate methods to measure GFR. In this article, we briefly remind the reader of the physiological basis of GFR. We then review the different techniques for the monitoring of kidney function (inulin clearance, endogenous creatinine clearance, plasma disappearance of a radiolabelled tracer) and discuss the pro and cons of each of them in different clinical settings. Finally, we try to define a rational use of these techniques in everyday clinical practice. [less ▲]

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See detailAdverse effect of hyperinsulinemia on cardiovascular risk profile in middle-aged belgian population
Saint-Remy, Annie ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Jeanjean, Michel et al

in Acta Cardiologica (1998), 53(5), 299

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See detailLes thiazolidinediones : quel avenir dans le traitement du diabète de type 2 ?
SCHEEN, André ULg; PAQUOT, Nicolas ULg; LETIEXHE, Michel ULg et al

in Médecine et Hygiène (1998), 56

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See detailTraitement ultime du diabete de type 2: insulinotherapie intensive ou chirurgie bariatrique?
Scheen, André ULg; Paquot, Nicolas ULg; Triches, K. et al

in Journées Annuelles de Diabetologie de l'Hôtel-Dieu (1998)

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See detailComment j'explore ... la nephropathie diabetique. Premiere partie: micro- et macro-albuminurie.
Weekers, Laurent ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(8), 494-8

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) appears in about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (D1) and 15 to 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes (D2). It is preceded by microalbuminuria. Microalbuminuria is defined as ... [more ▼]

Diabetic nephropathy (DN) appears in about 30% of patients with type 1 diabetes (D1) and 15 to 60% of patients with type 2 diabetes (D2). It is preceded by microalbuminuria. Microalbuminuria is defined as an albumin excretion rate between 30 and 300 mg/24 h (on a 24-hour urine collection) or between 20 and 200 micrograms/min (on an overnight collection) in at least two out of three consecutive collections made within a 6-month period. Alternative screening techniques use either dipstick (Micral-Test II) or the albumin to creatinine ratio on an early morning urine sample (30-300 mg/g creatinine). Once persistent microalbuminuria is confirmed, 80% of type 1 diabetic patients and 20 to 50% of type 2 diabetic patients will progress to DN. In D2, microalbuminuria also represents a powerful predictor of early mortality from cardiovascular disease. Macroalbuminuria (AER > 300 mg/24 h, corresponding to a total protein excretion > 500 mg/24 h) will eventually lead to a end-stage renal insufficiency within 10 to 20 years. In D2, numerous patients will die from cardiovascular disease before reaching end-stage renal failure. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors can slow down the evolution toward DN when prescribed when microalbuminuria appears. Screening for microalbuminuria should therefore be a part of the annual clinical assessment in every diabetic patient. [less ▲]

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See detailOral antidiabetic agents. A guide to selection.
Scheen, André ULg; Lefebvre, Pierre ULg

in Drugs (1998), 55(2), 225-36

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (formerly named non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or NIDDM) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin ... [more ▼]

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (formerly named non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or NIDDM) is a heterogeneous disease resulting from a dynamic interaction between defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. Various pharmacological approaches can be used to improve glucose homeostasis via different modes of action: sulphonylureas essentially stimulate insulin secretion, biguanides (metformin) act by promoting glucose utilisation and reducing hepatic-glucose production, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (acarbose) slow down carbohydrate absorption from the gut and thiazolidinediones (troglitazone) enhance cellular insulin action on glucose and lipid metabolism. These pharmacological treatments may be used individually for certain types of patients, or may be combined in a stepwise fashion to provide more ideal glycaemic control for most patients. Selection of oral antihyperglycaemic agents as first-line drug or combined therapy should be based on both the pharmacological properties of the compounds (efficacy and safety, profile) and the clinical characteristics of the patient (stage of disease, bodyweight, etc.). Mildly hyperglycaemic patients should preferably be treated with metformin, acarbose or thiazolidinediones (which are not associated with any hypoglycaemic risk), while more severely hyperglycaemic individuals should receive a sulphonylurea. In moderately hyperglycaemic patients, sulphonylureas should be preferred in nonobese patients while metformin, and probably also thiazolidinediones, should have priority in obese insulin-resistant type 2 diabetic patients. Acarbose is mainly indicated to reduce post-prandial glucose fluctuations and improve glycaemic stability. Each antihyperglycaemic agent may also be combined with insulin therapy to improve glycaemic control and/or reduce the insulin requirement of diabetic patients after secondary failure to oral treatment. Finally, safety should be taken into account in elderly patients and/or those with renal impairment, especially as far as the use of sulphonylureas (higher risk of hypoglycaemia) and metformin (higher risk of lactic acidosis) is concerned. [less ▲]

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See detailThe roles of time of day and sleep quality in modulating glucose regulation: clinical implications.
Scheen, André ULg; Van Cauter, E.

in Hormone Research (1998), 49(3-4), 191-201

Consistent variations in glucose regulation across the 24-hour cycle are present in normal subjects. These diurnal variations are altered in various states of impaired glucose tolerance (aging, obesity ... [more ▼]

Consistent variations in glucose regulation across the 24-hour cycle are present in normal subjects. These diurnal variations are altered in various states of impaired glucose tolerance (aging, obesity, diabetes). Changes in insulin secretion, clearance and/or action across the day have been demonstrated. Studies in subjects receiving continuous intravenous glucose infusion have shown that major alterations of glucose tolerance occur during sleep and that sleep quality markedly influences glucose utilization. Diurnal variations in glucose tolerance result from the alternation of wake and sleep states as well as from intrinsic effects of circadian rhythmicity. The important roles of physiological variations in levels of counterregulatory hormones which are markedly dependent on sleep (i.e. growth hormone) or circadian rhythmicity (i.e. cortisol) have only begun to be appreciated. The modulatory effects of sleep and circadian rhythmicity on glucose regulation may have important clinical implications for the diagnosis and treatment of abnormalities of carbohydrate metabolism. [less ▲]

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See detailAggressive weight reduction treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes.
Scheen, André ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (1998), 24(2), 116-23

Most patients with Type 2 diabetes are significantly overweight, and diet-induced weight loss can provide marked improvement in their glycaemic control. As conventional therapy combining diet and exercise ... [more ▼]

Most patients with Type 2 diabetes are significantly overweight, and diet-induced weight loss can provide marked improvement in their glycaemic control. As conventional therapy combining diet and exercise usually has a poor long-term success rate, more aggressive weight reduction programmes have been proposed for the treatment of severely obese diabetic patients, including very-low-calorie diets, anti-obesity drugs and bariatric surgery. Very-low-calorie diets usually have a remarkable short-term effect, and energy restriction and weight reduction are positive factors for the glycaemic control of obese diabetic subjects. However, the long-term efficacy of these methods remains doubtful since weight regain is a common phenomenon. Although anti-obesity (anorectic) drugs may help patients to follow a restricted diet and lose weight, their overall efficacy on body weight and glycaemia is generally modest, and their long-term safety still questionable. Interestingly, serotoninergic anorectic agents have been shown to improve both the insulin sensitivity and glycaemic control of obese diabetic patients independently of weight loss. Bariatric surgery may be helpful in well-selected patients. The correction of weight excess after successful gastroplasty fully reverses the abnormalities of insulin secretion, clearance and action on glucose metabolism present in markedly obese non-diabetic patients, and allows interruption or reduction of insulin therapy and antidiabetic oral agents in most obese diabetic patients. In conclusion, weight loss is a major goal in treating obese patients with Type 2 diabetes, and aggressive weight reduction programmes may be used in selected patients refractory to conventional diet and drug treatment. However, long-term prospective studies are needed for more precise determination of the role of such a strategy in the overall management of obese diabetic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailClinical efficacy of acarbose in diabetes mellitus: a critical review of controlled trials.
Scheen, André ULg

in Diabètes & Métabolism (1998), 24(4), 311-20

Acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, is a new antihyperglycaemic agent which has been proposed as add-on therapy in Type 2 diabetic patients not well-controlled with diet alone, sulphonylurea ... [more ▼]

Acarbose, an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, is a new antihyperglycaemic agent which has been proposed as add-on therapy in Type 2 diabetic patients not well-controlled with diet alone, sulphonylurea, metformin or insulin, and in Type 1 diabetic patients with large meal-related plasma glucose excursions. Numerous controlled studies investigating the clinical effects of acarbose in Type 2 diabetes versus either placebo or, more rarely, versus a reference drug (sulphonylurea or metformin) have been published during the last 10 years. All placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated the superiority of acarbose, at a dose of 150-600 mg/day, in decreasing fasting and postprandial glucose levels as well as HbA1c concentrations (mean decrease of 0.7%), whether acarbose was given as first-line therapy in diet-treated diabetic patients or in combination in individuals already receiving a sulphonylurea, metformin or insulin. Only a few controlled studies have compared the effects of acarbose with those of either sulphonylurea or metformin, yielding controversial results. In Type 1 diabetic patients, a small reduction of HbA1c levels was also reported after addition of acarbose to insulin therapy, which in some cases allowed a slight reduction of daily insulin needs. All these favourable biological effects occurred without exposing the patient to hypoglycaemia or weight gain. A few studies have also reported favourable effects on postprandial lipid profile and some other vascular risk factors. However, it is not clear whether the extra cost of acarbose, when compared to that of older oral antidiabetic agents, is justified since no study has yet demonstrated its potential benefit on the complications and long-term prognosis of diabetic patients. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of gastroplasty on body weight and related biological abnormalities in morbid obesity.
Luyckx, Françoise ULg; Scheen, André ULg; Desaive, Claude ULg et al

in Diabètes & Métabolism (1998), 24(4), 355-61

Obesity is a prevalent metabolic disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Medical treatment rarely succeeds, and bariatric surgery has been proposed as an alternative therapy. The ... [more ▼]

Obesity is a prevalent metabolic disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Medical treatment rarely succeeds, and bariatric surgery has been proposed as an alternative therapy. The purpose of this non-controlled retrospective study was to evaluate time-course changes in body weight in severely obese patients who underwent vertical ring gastroplasty or adjustable silicone gastric banding, and to assess the prevalence and potential reversibility of several of the biological abnormalities associated with morbid obesity. From an initial cohort comprising 658 patients, regular body weight measurements and biological data were obtained in 505 patients [419 females, 86 males; age 36 +/- 11 years; body mass index 42.7 +/- 6.9 kg/m2; (mean +/- SD)] with a mean follow-up of 26 +/- 14 months. Mean weight loss was 32 +/- 16 kg. Most weight reduction occurred within the first 6 months, followed by near-stabilisation or even slight weight regain. Most biological parameters were obtained before surgery and after at least 6 months of follow-up. The high prevalence and severity of metabolic disturbances associated with the insulin resistance syndrome (hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, decreased HDL cholesterol, hypertriglyceridaemia, elevated fibrinogen levels and hyperuricaemia) before gastroplasty were significantly decreased after weight loss. No major biological deficiencies were observed following gastroplasty, except low iron serum levels. It is concluded that marked weight loss associated with gastroplasty involved a remarkable reduction in the prevalence and severity of several biological abnormalities classically considered as cardiovascular risk factors. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of exercise on neuroendocrine secretions and glucose regulation at different times of day.
Scheen, André ULg; Buxton, O. M.; Jison, M. et al

in American Journal of Physiology (1998), 274(6 Pt 1), 1040-9

To study the effects of time of day on neuroendocrine and metabolic responses to exercise, body temperature, plasma glucose, insulin secretion rates (ISR), and plasma cortisol, growth hormone (GH) and ... [more ▼]

To study the effects of time of day on neuroendocrine and metabolic responses to exercise, body temperature, plasma glucose, insulin secretion rates (ISR), and plasma cortisol, growth hormone (GH) and thyrotropin (TSH) were measured in young men, both at bed rest and during a 3-h exercise period (40-60% maximal O2 uptake). Exercise was performed at three times of day characterized by marked differences in cortisol levels, i.e., early morning (n = 5), afternoon (n = 8), and around midnight (n = 9). The subjects were kept awake and fasted, but they received a constant glucose infusion to avoid hypoglycemia. Exercise-induced elevations of temperature were higher in the early morning than at other times of day. The exercise-induced glucose decrease was approximately 50% greater around midnight, when cortisol was minimal and not stimulated by exercise, than in the afternoon or early morning (P < 0.05). This effect of time of day appeared unrelated to decreases in ISR or increases in temperature and GH. Robust TSH increases occurred in all exercise periods and were maximal at night. The results demonstrate the existence of circadian variations in neuroendocrine and metabolic responses to exercise. [less ▲]

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See detailL'image du mois. Quelle chute!
Scheen, André ULg

in Revue Médicale de Liège (1998), 53(12), 725-6

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