References of "SALMON, Eric"
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See detailPLS analysis of fMRI data on cognitive processes
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg et al

Conference (2013, December 12)

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first ... [more ▼]

Cognitive processes like memory and self-referential are known to be underlined by extended neural networks. To study these complex processes, multivariate methods appear as the methods of the first choice since they take into account the functional integration. Partial Least Square (PLS) was used to study neural networks related to memory and self-referential processing in Alzheimer’s disease patients (AD) and two examples were presented. In the first one, we investigated the metabolic correlates of two forms of memory (conjunctive and relational memory performances) in AD. PLS identified two different brain networks highlighting correlations of the two types of memory and the glucose metabolism. In the second example, we assessed brain regions engaged during self-referential processing of information in AD patients during a task related fMRI study. PLS identified a wide brain network showing the effect of self- vs. other-referential processing. In contrast to univariate methods, PLS showed to be suitable for the study of cognitive processes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe impact of the salience of fluency in recognition memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Simon, Jessica ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; SALMON, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, December 06)

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the ... [more ▼]

According to the dual-process models, recognition memory is supported by recollection and familiarity (Yonelinas, 2002). Familiarity is a complex function that depends on several processes. One of the most important mechanisms is the sense of familiarity driven by the fluency processing (Whittlesea, 1993). The fluency can be defined by the enhancement of processing speed and the ease of processing due to an earlier encounter with the stimulus. Our objective is to explore the effect on an increase of salience of fluency cues on the recognition memory performance of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Sixteen AD patients and sixteen healthy elderly controls (HC) performed two conditions of a memory task. In the study phase, 25 words were presented at a rate of one word every 1.5s. Participants were instructed to read the words aloud and to try and remember them. After a break of 5 minutes, participant performed a yes/no recognition task with 25 studied words and 25 new words. In the Non-Overlap condition, the 25 studied words were composed of a subset of letters of the alphabet and the 25 new words of the remaining letters. In the Overlap condition, the 50 words were based on the whole alphabet. The two recognition tasks were separated by a delay of 24h. The capacity to discriminate between old and new items was measured by the index d’. An ANOVA on d’ scores revealed that discrimination was poorer in the AD group than in the HC and also poorer in the Overlap condition than in the Non-Overlap condition. The current results showed that to increase salience of fluency at the level of letter by eliminating letter-overlap between old and new words increases the recognition performance to the same extent in both groups but the amplitude of AD memory deficit was not reduced (Bastin, Willems, Genon, & Salmon, 2013). [less ▲]

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See detailRetirement and the onset of Alzheimer's disease: The ICTUS study
Grotz, Catherine ULg; Letenneur, luc; Bonsang, Eric et al

Conference (2013, October 03)

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See detailAge estimation from faces in Alzheimer disease
Moyse, Evelyne ULg; Brédart, Serge ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

Poster (2013, July)

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover ... [more ▼]

Although studies on age estimation showed that the performance of estimation is fairly accurate, this performance can be influenced by group biases such as the own-age bias (George & Hole, 1995). Moreover this bias occurs both in young and older adults (Moyse & Brédart, 2012). Because difficulties in face processing have been reported in Alzheimer disease (Della Sala et al., 1995), the aim of this study was to examine the performance of age estimation from faces in patients with Alzheimer disease (mild to moderate) compared with normal aging persons. Moreover to test the preservation of the occurrence of an own-age bias, stimuli belonging to different age groups (young, middle age and older adults) were used. We observed a main effect of Group indicating that patients were less accurate than control whatever the age of faces. In addition a main effect of Age of faces was obtained; the percentage of accuracy was better for older faces than for the two other age groups of faces. Consequently although patients’ performance in age estimation of faces is impaired, an own-age bias was still present. These results have two main interests: a clinical interest (expanding the diagnostic criteria of the Alzheimer disease) and a forensic interest (assessing the credibility of eyewitness testimony in older adults with a possible Alzheimer disease). [less ▲]

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See detailBrain metabolic dysfunction in Capgras syndrome during Alzheimer’s disease: a positron emission tomography study
Jedidi, Haroun ULg; Daury, Noémy; Cappa, Rémi et al

Poster (2013, June)

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See detailPreclinical radiation dosimetry for the novel SV2A radiotracer [18F]UCB-H
Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

in European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research (2013), 3(1), 35

Background: [18F]UCB-H was developed as a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, the binding site for the antiepileptic levetiracetam. The objectives of this study were to ... [more ▼]

Background: [18F]UCB-H was developed as a novel radiotracer with a high affinity for synaptic vesicle protein 2A, the binding site for the antiepileptic levetiracetam. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the radiation dosimetry of [18F]UCB-H in a preclinical trial and to determine the maximum injectable dose according to guidelines for human biomedical research. The radiation dosimetry was derived by organ harvesting and dynamic micro positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in mice, and the results of both methods were compared. Methods: Twenty-four male C57BL-6 mice were injected with 6.96 ± 0.81 MBq of [18F]UCB-H, and the biodistribution was determined by organ harvesting at 2, 5, 10, 30, 60, and 120 min (n = 4 for each time point). Dynamic microPET imaging was performed on five male C57BL-6 mice after the injection of 9.19 ± 3.40 MBq of [18F]UCB-H. A theoretical dynamic bladder model was applied to simulate urinary excretion. Human radiation dose estimates were derived from animal data using the International Commission on Radiological Protection 103 tissue weighting factors. Results: Based on organ harvesting, the urinary bladder wall, liver and brain received the highest radiation dose with a resulting effective dose of 1.88E-02 mSv/MBq. Based on dynamic imaging an effective dose of 1.86E-02 mSv/MBq was calculated, with the urinary bladder wall and liver (brain was not in the imaging field of view) receiving the highest radiation. Conclusions: This first preclinical dosimetry study of [18F]UCB-H showed that the tracer meets the standard criteria for radiation exposure in clinical studies. The dose-limiting organ based on US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European guidelines was the urinary bladder wall for FDA and the effective dose for Europe with a maximum injectable single dose of approximately 325 MBq was calculated. Although microPET imaging showed significant deviations from organ harvesting, the Pearson’s correlation coefficient between radiation dosimetry derived by either method was 0.9666. [less ▲]

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