References of "SALMON, Eric"
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See detailImpairments of 3D visual perception in posterior cortical atrophy: functional and anatomical characterization
Gillebert, Céline; Bastin, Christine ULg; Sunaert, Stefan et al

Conference (2013)

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See detailEpisodic autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: What are the neural correlates?
Bastin, Christine ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg; Jedidi, Haroun ULg et al

in Human Brain Mapping (2013), 34

Autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is characterized by impaired retrieval of episodic memories, but relatively preserved personal semantic knowledge. This study aimed to ... [more ▼]

Autobiographical memory in amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment (aMCI) is characterized by impaired retrieval of episodic memories, but relatively preserved personal semantic knowledge. This study aimed to identify (via FDG-PET) the neural substrates of impaired episodic specificity of autobiographical memories in 35 aMCI patients compared with 24 healthy elderly controls. Significant correlations between regional cerebral activity and the proportion of episodic details in autobiographical memories from two life periods were found in specific regions of an autobiographical brain network. In aMCI patients, more than in controls, specifically episodic memories from early adulthood were associated with metabolic activity in the cuneus and in parietal regions. We hypothesized that variable retrieval of episodic autobiographical memories in our aMCI patients would be related to their variable capacity to reactivate specific sensory-perceptual and contextual details of early adulthood events linked to reduced (occipito-parietal) visual imagery and less efficient (parietal) attentional processes. For recent memories (last year), a correlation emerged between the proportion of episodic details and activity in lateral temporal regions and the temporo-parietal junction. Accordingly, variable episodic memory for recent events may be related to the efficiency of controlled search through general events likely to provide cues for the retrieval of episodic details and to the ability to establish a self perspective favouring recollection. [less ▲]

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See detailItem familiarity and controlled associative retrieval in Alzheimer's disease: An fMRI study
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2013), 49

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See detailBenevolent sexism alters executive brain responses
Dardenne, Benoît ULg; Dumont, Murielle; Sarlet, Marie et al

in Neuroreport (2013), 24(10), 572-577

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported ... [more ▼]

Benevolence is widespread in our societies. It is defined as considering a subordinate group nicely but condescendingly, that is, with charity. Deleterious consequences for the target have been reported in the literature. In this experiment, we used functional MRI (fMRI) to identify whether being the target of (sexist) benevolence induces changes in brain activity associated with a working memory task. Participants were confronted by benevolent, hostile, or neutral comments before and while performing a reading span test in an fMRI environment. fMRI data showed that brain regions associated previously with intrusive thought suppression (bilateral, dorsolateral,prefrontal, and anterior cingulate cortex) reacted specifically to benevolent sexism compared with hostile sexism and neutral conditions during the performance of the task. These findings indicate that, despite being subjectively positive, benevolence modifies task-related brain networks by recruiting supplementary areas likely to impede optimal cognitive performance. [less ▲]

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See detailFonctionnement mnésique et maladie d’Alzheimer
Salmon, Eric ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Lettre des Académies (La) (2013), 29

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Psychophysiology (2013), 27(Suppl 1), 48

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See detailThe neural correlates of recollection and familiarity during aging
Angel, Lucie; Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

Poster (2013)

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See detailExploration of the mechanisms underlying the ISPC effect: Evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging data
Grandjean, Julien; D'Ostilio, Kevin ULg; Fias, Wim et al

in Neuropsychologia (2013), 51

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest ... [more ▼]

The item-specific proportion congruent (ISPC) effect in a Stroop task – the observation of reduced interference for color words mostly presented in an incongruent color – has attracted growing interest since the original study by Jacoby (2003). Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain the effect: associative learning of contingencies and item-specific control through word reading modulation. Both interpretations have received empirical support from behavioral data. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the responsible mechanisms of the ISPC effect with the classic two-item sets design using fMRI. Results showed that the ISPC effect is associated with increased activity in the anterior cingulate (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC), and inferior and superior parietal cortex. Importantly, behavioral and fMRI analyses specifically addressing the respective contribution of associative learning and item-specific control mechanisms brought support for the contingency learning account of the ISPC effect. Results are discussed in reference to task and procedure characteristics that may influence the extent to which item-specific control and/or contingency learning contribute to the ISPC effect. [less ▲]

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See detailAssociative memory in aging: The effect of unitization on source memory
Bastin, Christine ULg; Diana, Rachel A.; Simon, Jessica ULg et al

in Psychology & Aging (2013), 28(1), 275-283

In normal aging, memory for associations declines more than memory for individual items. Unitization is an encoding process defined by creation of a new single entity to represent a new arbitrary ... [more ▼]

In normal aging, memory for associations declines more than memory for individual items. Unitization is an encoding process defined by creation of a new single entity to represent a new arbitrary association. The current study tested the hypothesis that age-related differences in associative memory can be reduced following encoding instructions that promote unitization. In two experiments, groups of 20 young and 20 older participants learned new associations between a word and a background color under two conditions. In the item detail condition, they had to imagine that the item is the same color as the background; an instruction promoting unitization of the associations. In the context detail condition, that did not promote unitization, they had to imagine that the item interacted with another colored object. At test, they had to retrieve the color that was associated to each word (source memory). In both experiments, the results showed an age-related decrement in source memory performance in the context detail but not in the item detail condition. Moreover, Experiment 2 examined receiver operating characteristics in older participants and indicated that familiarity contributed more to source memory performance in the item detail than in the context detail condition. These findings suggest that unitization of new associations can overcome the associative memory deficit observed in aging, at least for item-color associations. [less ▲]

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See detailPROFINTEG: A TOOL FOR REAL-LIFE ASSESSMENT OF ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING IN PATIENTS WITH COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
Anselme, Patrick ULg; Poncelet, Martine ULg; Bouwens, Sharon et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2013), 53(1), 3-22

Although there are many instruments for assessing activities of daily living (IADL) in brain injured patients, few instruments specifically target cognitive impairment and its impact on IADL. The present ... [more ▼]

Although there are many instruments for assessing activities of daily living (IADL) in brain injured patients, few instruments specifically target cognitive impairment and its impact on IADL. The present study presents the development of the Profinteg instrument, a tool for real-life assessment as well as rehabilitation of IADL in patients with cognitive impairment. This two-stage instrument covers over 90 activities. Psychometric properties of the different Profinteg measures were explored in twenty-five patients with mild to severe cognitive difficulties and twenty-five caregivers. The feasibility of the Profinteg rehabilitation procedure was explored in three patients. Excellent interrater reliability (r > 0.90, p < 0.01) was observed for all measures. Good sensitivity to changes in IADL disability over time was also observed (T = 2.37, p < 0.02). Significant improvement of IADL functioning was found after rehabilitation guided by Profinteg assessment. The Profinteg instrument detects with precision the difficulties patients encounter in their real-life setting via (1) assessment of a large number of activities and (2) detailed decomposition of activities into sub-activities. The Profinteg tool also provides promising results for guidance of IADL rehabilitation in the patient’s real-life environment. [less ▲]

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See detailCONTROLLED AND AUTOMATIC MEMORY RETRIEVAL IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE
Bastin, Christine ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg et al

in Proceedings of the 8th Panhellenic Interdisciplinary Conference of Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders (2013)

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See detailEnhancing the salience of fluency improves recognition memory performance in mild Alzheimer’s disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Willems, Sylvie ULg; Genon, Sarah ULg et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease [=JAD] (2013), 33

Recognition memory can rely on recollection (recall of the details from the encoding episode) and familiarity (feeling that some information is old without any recollection). In Alzheimer’s disease (AD ... [more ▼]

Recognition memory can rely on recollection (recall of the details from the encoding episode) and familiarity (feeling that some information is old without any recollection). In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), whereas there is a clear deficit of recollection, the evidence regarding familiarity is mixed, with some studies showing preserved familiarity and others reporting impairment. The current study examined whether recognition memory performance can be improved in AD when the use of familiarity is facilitated by the salience of processing fluency due to an earlier encounter with the information. Fifteen AD patients and 16 healthy controls performed a verbal recognition memory task where the salience of fluency was manipulated by means of letters overlap. Studied and unstudied words were constituted of either two separate sets of letters (no-overlap condition, high fluency salience) or the same set of letters (overlap condition, low fluency salience). The results showed that, although performance was globally poorer in AD patients than in the controls, both groups performed significantly better in the no-overlap condition than in the overlap condition. This suggests that AD patients benefited as much as the controls from the salience of fluency. [less ▲]

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See detailVerbal learning in Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment:fine-grained acquisition and short-delay consolidation performance and neural correlates
Genon, Sarah ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg; Moulin, Chris et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2013), 34

The aim of this study was to examine correlations between acquisition and short-delay consolidation and brain metabolism at rest measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in 44 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to examine correlations between acquisition and short-delay consolidation and brain metabolism at rest measured by fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in 44 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients, 16 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who progressed to dementia (MCI-AD), 15 MCI patients who remained stable (MCI-S, 4–8 years of follow-up), and 20 healthy older participants. Acquisition and short-delay consolidation were calculated respectively as mean gained (MG) and lost (ML) access to items of the California Verbal Learning Task. MG performance suggests that acquisition is impaired in AD patients even at predementia stage (MCI-AD). ML performance suggests that short-delay consolidation is deficient only in confirmed AD patients. Variations in acquisition performance in control participants are related to metabolic activity in the anterior parietal cortex, an area supporting task-positive attentional processes. In contrast, the acquisition deficit is related to decreased activity in the lateral temporal cortex, an area supporting semantic processes, in patients at an early stage of AD and is related to metabolic activity in the hippocampus, an area supporting associative processes, in confirmed AD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance Evaluation of the GE eXplore CT 120 Micro-CT for Various Scanning Protocols
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Bretin, Florian ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg et al

Poster (2012, November 03)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the General Electric (GE) eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the same methodology and image quality assurance vmCT phantom developed for the GE eXplore ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the General Electric (GE) eXplore CT 120 micro-CT using the same methodology and image quality assurance vmCT phantom developed for the GE eXplore Ultra. In addition, Quality assurance in Radiology and Medicine (QRM) low contrast and bar pattern phantoms were used. The phantoms were imaged using the six protocols regularly used in our laboratory (Fast scan 220 (P1) or 360 (P2): 70 kV, 32 mA, 220 or 360 views; Soft tissue fast scan (P3): 70 kV, 50 mA, 220 views, Soft tissue step & shoot (P4): 80 kV, 32 mA, 220 views; Low Noise (P5): 100 kV, 50 mA, 720 views and In Vivo Bone scan (P6): 100 kV, 50 mA, 360 views). Data were reconstructed with an isotropic voxel size of 100 µm (50 µm when protocol detector-binning was reduced to 2x2). The MTF obtained with the slanted edge and coil methods agreed very well. A 10% modulation transfer function (MTF) was observed in the range 3.6-4.8 mm-1 (P1&2 = 4.2; P3&4 = 4.8; P5 = 3.6 and P6 = 3.8), corresponding to 95-138 µm resolutions. The smallest bars visually observed on the QRM pattern phantom image were 100 µm. The geometric accuracy was better than 0.1%. A highly linear (R2 > 0.999) relationship between measured and expected CT numbers for both the CT number accuracy and linearity sections of the phantom was observed with a voltage dependent slope. A cupping effect was observed on the uniform slices. This effect was clearly highlighted by the uniformity-to-noise ratio (P1 = 0.58, P2&3&4 = 0.75, P5 = 1.35 and P6 = 2.74) especially for the low-noise protocols P5 and P6. The best low contrast discrimination was observed for P2 and P5 protocols. In conclusion the eXplore CT 120 achieved a resolution in the range 95-138 µm. It was found to be linear and geometrically accurate. The major difference between the protocols was the noise level which limits the detectability of low contrasts. [less ▲]

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See detailPerformance Measurements of the microPET FOCUS 120 for Iodine-124 Imaging
Taleb, Dounia ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Seret, Alain ULg et al

in IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science (2012), PP

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the microPET FOCUS 120 for 124I in terms of counting rate capability and image quality using the NEMA NU 4-2008 methodology. Scanner sensitivity was ... [more ▼]

This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the microPET FOCUS 120 for 124I in terms of counting rate capability and image quality using the NEMA NU 4-2008 methodology. Scanner sensitivity was measured for 124I for comparison and reached 75 cps/kBq, respectively, with the usual 350-650 keV energy window (EW) and 6 ns time window (TW). The noise equivalent count rate (NECR) index was defined as: NECR = RT2/(RP+RGP) (T = true, P = prompt, GP = γ-prompt). A rat phantom maximum NECR of 48 kcps was obtained for the 250-590 keV EW with 6 ns TW. An almost identical maximum NECR of 43 kcps was recorded for 350-590 and 350-650 keV EW and 6 ns TW. The 2 ns TW reduced the sensitivity and NECR by 40-50% for all EW. The mouse phantom NECR study was limited because of the maximum available activity concentration of 124I. The 250-590 keV EW showed the largest scatter and γ-prompt plus scatter fractions with 25.7% and 43%, respectively, for the rat phantom and 12.2% and 27% for the mouse phantom. With the 350-590 keV EW, these fractions decreased to 20% and 33.5% for the rat phantom and to 10% and 21% for the mouse phantom. The image quality was investigated with the NEMA NU 4-2008 dedicated phantom for four (two analytic and two iterative) 2D or 3D reconstruction methods. The lowest spillover ratios (SOR) for the phantom non-emitting regions were obtained for the 350-590 and 350-650 keV EWs. Recovery coefficients (RC) of the hot rods were the highest for the 350-590 keV EW except for the 1 mm rod. Scatter correction led to a large decrease in RC. The combination of the 350-590 keV EW with 6 ns TW appeared to be a good compromise between counting rate capability and image quality for the FOCUS 120, especially when maximum a posteriori reconstruction was used without scatter correction. Moreover this combination enabled the best quantification with an error as low as 0.36%. [less ▲]

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See detailCHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL RADIOTRACER TARGETING SYNAPTIC VESICLE PROTEIN 2A (SV2A)
Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Aerts, Joël ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) has been identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic levetiracetam (Keppra) [1]. SV2 proteins are critical for proper nervous system function and have been ... [more ▼]

Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) has been identified as the binding site of the antiepileptic levetiracetam (Keppra) [1]. SV2 proteins are critical for proper nervous system function and have been demonstrated to be involved in vesicle trafficking. Their implication in epilepsy makes them an interesting therapeutic target, and the widespread distribution of SV2A in particular may provide an opportunity to develop a PET-based measure of neuronal function in brain diseases. [18F]UCB-H is a fluorine-18 radiolabelled PET imaging agent with a nanomolar affinity for the human SV2A protein. Preclinical PET studies in rodents were carried out using male SD rats, imaged under isoflurane anaesthesia in a Siemens Concorde Focus 120 microPET scanner. Arterial input function was measured using an arteriovenous shunt method and beta microprobe system. [18F]UCB-H was injected IV (3.8 ± 0.54 mCi bolus, specific activity 8.5 ± 0.86 Ci/Emol immediately after synthesis) and dynamic PET data acquired in list mode for 90 min. Images were reconstructed using filtered back projection with correction for all physical effects except scatter. These scans revealed high uptake of [18F]UCB-H in brain and spinal cord, matching the expected homogeneous distribution of SV2A in the rodent brain [2]. Notably, the kinetics of [18F]UCB-H uptake in the brain were fast, peaking at up to 30 % ID/cm3 before a rapid decline. Metabolism of [18F]UCB-H in vivo followed a typical pattern of rapid initial metabolism followed by a reducing rate of metabolism over time, with less than 20% of the activity in plasma attributable to the parent compound after 30 minutes, and was highly reproducible between subjects. One major metabolite was identified. The uptake of [18F]UCB-H in the brain over time was well fitted by a classical 1-tissue compartment model. Mean parameter estimates (mean ± SD, n=7, whole brain VOI) were K1: 3.58 ± 0.65 ml/cm3/min, k2: 0.21 ± 0.03 min-1, Vt: 17.21 ± 2.52 ml/cm3. Uptake of [18F]UCB-H was blocked by pretreatment with brivaracetam (21 mg/kg IV, 10 min prior to [18F]UCB-H), a recently described high affinity SV2A ligand with a 20-fold higher affinity for SV2A than levetiracetam [3]. In contrast, pretreatment with ucb-100230-1, a diastereoisomer of brivaracetam with 3200-fold lower affinity for SV2A [3], had no clear effect of the brain uptake of [18F]UCB-H. Our results indicate that [18F]UCB-H is a suitable radiotracer for the quantification of SV2A proteins in vivo and for estimating target occupancy of drugs targeting SV2A. This is the first PET tracer for in vivo quantification of SV2A. The necessary steps for implementation of [18F]UCB-H production under GMP conditions have been completed and first in human studies are planned. References [1] Lynch, B.A. et al. (2004) PNAS 101(26):9861-6. [2] Janz, R. & Sudhof, T.C. (1999) Neuroscience 94(4):1279-1290.[3] Gillard, M. et al. (2011) Eur J Pharmacol 664:36-44. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroPET Focus 120 scanner use at high-­‐count rate
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg; Taleb, Dounia ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

Kinetic modeling of physiological processes using imaging techniques requires an accurate measurement of the time-activity curve of the tracer in plasma, known as the arterial input function (IF). The IF ... [more ▼]

Kinetic modeling of physiological processes using imaging techniques requires an accurate measurement of the time-activity curve of the tracer in plasma, known as the arterial input function (IF). The IF can be obtained by manual blood sampling, can be derived from PET images, or continuously measured by the use of small counting systems such as beta microprobes [1]. However, some beta microprobe systems can suffering from high background counts and low sensitivity compared to PET can obligate the use of activities higher than those typical for the imaging system. In the present study, the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality (IQ) phantom [2] was used to evaluate the image quality of the microPET Focus 120 at high activity values. Attenuation correction was obtained from transmission measurement using 57Co point source. Eight emission scans of 20 minutes were performed at decreasing activity starting from 109 MBq to 3.7 MBq (total activity in the field-of-view). To study the effect of normalization in high count rate studies, several normalization scans were performed using activities ranging between 18 and 212 MBq. Images were reconstructed with all corrections using Fourier rebinning and filtered backprojection. The mean activity and the coefficients of variation of the uniform slices were measured. All high activity reconstructed images showed a detector-block-patterned artifact with an overestimation of the counts when normalization activity is higher than that used in the IQ phantom and underestimation of the counts when normalization activity is below the activity used in the IQ phantom. Using the same high activity for acquisition and normalization considerably reduces the patterned-artifact but does not eliminate it entirely. The observed artifact is due to pulse pile-up in the detectors at high count-rates. A dedicated rejection of the pulse pile-up does not appear to have been implemented for the microPET Focus 120. An alternative would be to re-calibrate the detectors with higher activity values to prevent any pile-up effect or to create an attenuation volume into which phantoms or small animals could be inserted thus decreasing the artifact. This latter option is under development. References: [1] G. Warnock et al, European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Research, 1-13 (2011) [2] NEMA Standards Publication NU4-2008. Rosslyn, VA: National Electrical Manufacturers Association; (2008). [less ▲]

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See detailSmall animal imaging with human PET
Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Tombuloglu, S; Warnock, Geoffrey ULg et al

Poster (2012, September)

PET studies provide valuable information in the assessment of animal models for human diseases. MicroPET systems provide the high resolution needed to explore small organs but suffer from a reduced axial ... [more ▼]

PET studies provide valuable information in the assessment of animal models for human diseases. MicroPET systems provide the high resolution needed to explore small organs but suffer from a reduced axial FOV. Multiple bed positions are then used to obtain whole body scans resulting in increased scan time and incomplete dynamic data. In contrast, human PET systems have larger axial FOV but a lower resolution. In this study, an image-based model of the scanner spatial response function combined with a 3D-OSEM reconstruction algorithm were used to improve spatial resolution of the Siemens ECAT EXACT HR+ PET scanner. A stationary double Gaussian model [1] of the ECAT EXACT HR+ point spread function was derived from 18F point source measurements performed at different radial and axial locations in the scanner FOV. This model was used in a 3D-OSEM reconstruction (3D-OSEM-RM). Sinograms were normalized and attenuation and scatter corrected using the Siemens ECAT tools before reconstruction. Both NEMA NU 2-1994 performance phantoms and NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom mimicking small animals were used to evaluate the accuracy of corrections for physical effects and the overall image quality. A 50 min dynamic FDG rat study was conducted on the ECAT HR+ and reconstructed with 3D-OSEM-RM. The images were used to compute the metabolic rate of glucose (MRglu) in multiple brain structures. These images were also visually compared to the static image obtained with a FOCUS 120 microPET immediately after the HR+ dynamic scan. The standard deviations of the two Gaussians used to model the transaxial (axial) resolution in a central FOV of 5 cm radius were σ1 = 1.6 (2.75) mm and σ2 = 3.66 (4.16) mm, and the ratio of the weights between the first and second Gaussians was ρ = 0.2 (0.7). Image uniformity and accuracy of scatter and attenuation corrections, evaluated following NEMA NU 2-1994, were found to be very similar between 3D-OSEM, 3D-OSEM-RM, 2D- and 3D-FBP reconstructed images. When using the NEMA NU4-2008 image quality phantom a significant increase of the hot rod recovery coefficient was observed. This effect was rod size dependent and amounted to 17-35% for the 3D-OSEM-RM compared to the 3D-OSEM and to 35-62% compared to the FBP reconstructions. Nevertheless the values obtained with 3D-OSEM-RM were around 20-35% lower than those obtained with the FOCUS 120 microPET scanner. Most of the small brain structures observed on microPET images were also visible on the images obtained with the HR+ scanner and 3D-OSEM-RM. Rat cerebral MRglu values calculated on 3D-OSEM-RM images were in the range of published values [2] (e.g. whole brain = 25.34 μmol/min/100g). Using an approximate model of the ECAT EXACT HR+ spatial response in 3D-OSEM resulted in sufficient image quality for dynamic whole body scans of small rodents, despite the large FOV, and resulted in improved contrast compared to images generated using the built-in software. This methodology will be applied for future small animal dosimetry and modeling studies in our laboratory. [1] Comtat et al. IEEE Nucl Sci Symp Conf Record. pp. 4120-4123 (2008) [2] Schiffer et al. J Nucl Med 48:277-287 (2007) [less ▲]

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