References of "SALMON, Eric"
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See detailEarly neuropsychological detection of Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg

in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2014), 68

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See detailBetter neuronal efficiency after emotional competences training: an fMRI study
Hansenne, Michel ULg; Nelis, Delphine; Feyers, Dorothée ULg et al

in Psychologica Belgica (2014), 54

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See detailThe neural bases of proactive and reactive control processes in normal aging
Manard, Marine ULg; François, Sarah ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailFunctional connectivity and recognition of familiar faces in Alzheimer’s disease
Kurth, Sophie ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Moyse, Evelyne ULg et al

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailCognitive and neuroimaging evidence of impaired interaction between Self and memory in Alzheimer’s disease
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 51

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect ... [more ▼]

In human cognition, self and memory processes strongly interact, as evidenced by the memory advantage for self-referential materials (Self Reference Effect (SRE) and Self Reference Recollection Effect (SRRE)). The current study examined this interaction at the behavioural level and its neural correlates in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Healthy older controls (HC) and AD patients performed trait-adjectives judgements either for self-relevance or for other-relevance (encoding phase). In a first experiment, the encoding and subsequent yes-no recognition phases were administrated in an MRI scanner. Brain activation as measured by fMRI was examined during self-relevance judgements and anatomical images were used to search for correlation between the memory advantage for self-related items and grey matter density (GMD). In a second experiment, participants described the retrieval experience that had driven their recognition decisions (familiarity vs. recollective experience). The behavioural results revealed that the SRE and SRRE were impaired in AD patients compared to HC participants. Furthermore, verbal reports revealed that the retrieval of self-related information was preferentially associated with the retrieval of contextual details, such as source memory in the HC participants, but less so in the AD patients. Our imaging findings revealed that both groups activated the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) at encoding during self-relevance judgments. However, the variable and limited memory advantage for self-related information was associated with GMD in the lateral prefrontal cortex in the AD patients, a region supporting high-order processes linking self and memory. These findings suggest that even if AD patients engage MPFC during self-referential judgments, the retrieval of self-related memories is qualitatively and quantitatively impaired in relation with altered high-order processes in the lateral PFC. [less ▲]

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See detailExploration of unitization processes in episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease
Delhaye, Emma ULg; Salmon, Eric ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg

in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience (2014)

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See detailMetabolic cerebral correlates of conjunctive and relational memory in Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULg; Bahri, Mohamed Ali ULg; Collette, Fabienne ULg et al

Poster (2014)

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Memory deficits are the clinical hallmark of typical Alzheimer’s disease. The precise nature of these deficits however remains to be fully characterized. In this study, we investigated binding in long-term episodic memory. Relational binding processes in memory create an associative link between independent items or between items and context into episodic memories (Cohen et al., 1999). An alternative process, conjunctive binding, allows associations to be encoded as a united representation of features into a single entity (O'Reilly and Rudy, 2001; Mayes et al., 2007). The current study (1) assessed whether Alzheimer’s disease disrupt both conjunctive and relational memory, and (2) related patients’ memory performance to cerebral metabolism. Methods. Thirty patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease and 24 healthy older adults performed a source memory task where items were associated to a background color (Diana et al., 2008, 2010). In one condition, relational binding was promoted by the instruction to associate the item with another object of the same color as the background. In the other condition, color had to be integrated as an item feature (conjunctive binding). Patients’ brain metabolic activity at rest (FDG-PET) was analysed with spatio-temporal Partial Least Squares (McIntosh et al., 1996) in order to assess the relation of behavioral performance and activity in functional cerebral networks. Results. Alzheimer’s disease patients had an impaired capacity to remember item-color associations, with deficits in both relational and conjunctive memory. However, performance in the two kinds of associative memory varied independently across patients. Partial least square analyses revealed a significant pattern of metabolic activity that correlated specifically with each condition (accounting for 76.48 % of the covariance in the data; p< .05). More specifically, poor conjunctive memory was related to hypometabolism in an anterior temporal-posterior fusiform brain network, whereas relational memory correlated with metabolism in regions of the default mode network. Conclusions. These findings support the hypothesis of distinct neural systems specialized in different types of associative memory and point to heterogeneous profiles of memory alteration in Alzheimer’s disease as a function of damage to the respective neural networks. [less ▲]

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See detailBrains creating stories of selves: the neural basis of autobiographical reasoning.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULg; Cassol, Helena; Phillips, Christophe ULg et al

in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience (2014), 9

Personal identity critically depends on the creation of stories about the self and one's life. The present study investigates the neural substrates of autobiographical reasoning, a process central to the ... [more ▼]

Personal identity critically depends on the creation of stories about the self and one's life. The present study investigates the neural substrates of autobiographical reasoning, a process central to the construction of such narratives. During fMRI scanning, participants approached a set of personally significant memories in two different ways: on some trials, they remembered the concrete content of the events (autobiographical remembering), whereas on other trials they reflected on the broader meaning and implications of their memories (autobiographical reasoning). Relative to remembering, autobiographical reasoning recruited a left-lateralized network involved in conceptual processing (including the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, and angular gyrus). The ventral MPFC-an area that may function to generate personal/affective meaning-was not consistently engaged during autobiographical reasoning across participants but, interestingly, the activity of this region was modulated by individual differences in interest and willingness to engage in self-reflection. These findings support the notion that autobiographical reasoning and the construction of personal narratives go beyond mere remembering in that they require deriving meaning and value from past experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailA Partial Least Squares Analysis of the self reference effect in Alzheimer's disease: A reply to Irish
Genon, Sarah ULg; Bastin, Christine ULg; Angel, Lucie et al

in Cortex : A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System & Behavior (2014), 54

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (14 ULg)