References of "SALMON, Eric"
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See detail18F-flutemetamol amyloid imaging in Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment: a phase 2 trial.
Vandenberghe, R.; Van Laere, K.; Ivanoiu, A. et al

in Annals of Neurology (2010), 68(3), 319-329

Objective: The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo -amyloid imaging is 11CPittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site ... [more ▼]

Objective: The most widely studied positron emission tomography ligand for in vivo -amyloid imaging is 11CPittsburgh compound B (11C-PIB). Its availability, however, is limited by the need for an on-site cyclotron. Validation of the 18F-labeled PIB derivative 18F-flutemetamol could significantly enhance access to this novel technology. Methods: Twenty-seven patients with early-stage clinically probable Alzheimer disease (AD), 20 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 15 cognitively intact healthy volunteers (HVs) above and 10 HVs below 55 years of age participated. The primary endpoint was the efficacy of blinded visual assessments of 18F-flutemetamol scans in assigning subjects to a raised versus normal uptake category, with clinical diagnosis as the standard of truth (SOT). As secondary objectives, we determined the correlation between the regional standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) for 18F-flutemetamol and its parent molecule 11C-PIB in 20 of the AD subjects and 20 of the MCI patients. We also determined test-retest variability of 18F-flutemetamol SUVRs in 5 of the AD subjects. Results: Blinded visual assessments of 18F-flutemetamol scans assigned 25 of 27 scans from AD subjects and 1 of 15 scans from the elderly HVs to the raised category, corresponding to a sensitivity of 93.1% and a specificity of 93.3% against the SOT. Correlation coefficients between cortical 18F-flutemetamol SUVRs and 11C-PIB SUVRs ranged from 0.89 to 0.92. Test-retest variabilities of regional SUVRs were 1 to 4%. Interpretation: 18F-Flutemetamol performs similarly to the 11C-PIB parent molecule within the same subjects and provides high test-retest replicability and potentially much wider accessibility for clinical and research use. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of medial prefrontal and inferior parietal cortices when thinking about past, present, and future selves.
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Stawarczyk, David ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege et al

in Social Neuroscience (2010), 5

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that reflecting on representations of the present self versus temporally distant selves is associated with higher activity in the medial prefrontal cortex ... [more ▼]

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown that reflecting on representations of the present self versus temporally distant selves is associated with higher activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). In the current fMRI study, we investigated whether this effect of temporal perspective is symmetrical between the past and future. The main results revealed that the MPFC showed higher activity when reflecting on the present self than when reflecting on past and future selves, with no difference between past and future selves. Temporal perspective also modulated activity in the right inferior parietal cortex but in the opposite direction, activity in this brain region being higher when reflecting on past and future selves relative to the present self (with again no difference between past and future selves). These findings show that differences in brain activity when thinking about current versus temporally distant selves are symmetrical between the past and the future. It is suggested that by processing degrees of self-relatedness, the MPFC might sustain the process of identifying oneself with current representations of the self, whereas the right inferior parietal cortex might be involved in distinguishing the present self from temporally distant selves. [less ▲]

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See detailThe neural basis of personal goal processing when envisioning future events
D'Argembeau, Arnaud ULiege; Stawarczyk, David ULiege; Majerus, Steve ULiege et al

in Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2010), 22

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or ... [more ▼]

Abstract Episodic future thinking allows humans to mentally simulate virtually infinite future possibilities, yet this device is fundamentally goal-directed and should not be equated with fantasizing or wishful thinking. The purpose of this functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate the neural basis of such goal-directed processing during future-event simulation. Participants were scanned while they imagined future events that were related to their personal goals (personal future events) and future events that were plausible but unrelated to their personal goals (nonpersonal future events). Results showed that imaging personal future events elicited stronger activation in ventral medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) compared to imaging nonpersonal future events. Moreover, these brain activations overlapped with activations elicited by a second task that assessed semantic self-knowledge (i.e., making judgments on one's own personality traits), suggesting that ventral MPFC and PCC mediate self-referential processing across different functional domains. It is suggested that these brain regions may support a collection of processes that evaluate, code, and contextualize the relevance of mental representations with regard to personal goals. The implications of these findings for the understanding of the function instantiated by the default network of the brain are also discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMémoire épisodique et métamémoire dans la variante comportementale de la démence fronto-temporale
Feyers, Dorothée ULiege; Bastin, Christine ULiege; Collette, Fabienne ULiege et al

Conference (2009, September 28)

Impaired memory performance does not constitute the prominent deficit in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Nevertheless, it has been suggested that some specific aspects of memory may be disrupted in FTD ... [more ▼]

Impaired memory performance does not constitute the prominent deficit in frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Nevertheless, it has been suggested that some specific aspects of memory may be disrupted in FTD patients, in particular, the ability to consciously recollect the context in which information has been learned (Simons et al., 2002). The aims of the current study was to investigate the states of awareness accompanying recognition memory by asking participants to make Remember/Know/Guess judgments. Concretely, 12 FDT patients and 12 matched healthy participants studied 20 word pairs. During cued recall, each trial consisted of one word from a pair and participants had to try to recall the associated word. Finally, a 5-alternative forced-choice recognition task was given and participants had to say whether they chose a word because they recollected the study context (Remember), they knew they saw the word, without recalling anything else (Know) or they guessed (Guess). Results from the cued recall and recognition parts indicated that FTD recalled less word pairs than the controls, but had similar levels of recognition performance. Nevertheless, FTD patients gave less Remember responses than the controls, and tended to give more Guess responses. To conclude, episodic memory performance in FTD was characterised by impaired self-initiated memory retrieval processes. Although global recognition memory performance was preserved, FTD patients’ memories lacked of autonoetic consciousness and were mainly based on familiarity judgments and guessing. This pattern of results is similar to that found in patients with focal frontal lobe lesions (e.g., Wheeler et al., 1995; Wheeler & Stuss, 2003) and is consistent with the idea that the memory dysfunctions observed in FTD may stem from damage to the prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailRI48 in very early AD
Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege

Conference (2009, July 06)

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See detailIs there an interest to determine the gait’s profile of MCI subjects to predict the risk of Alzheimer disease?
Gillain, Sophie ULiege; Lekeu, Françoise ULiege; Wojtasik, Vinciane ULiege et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2009, June), 13(Supp 1),

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See detailInterest of Locometrix to assess gait’s profile in specific old populations
Gillain, Sophie ULiege; Warzee, Emmanuelle ULiege; Lekeu, Françoise ULiege et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2009, June), 13(Supp 1),

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See detailPatients with Alzheimer's disease use metamemory to attenuate the Jacoby-Whitehouse illusion.
Willems, Sylvie ULiege; Germain, Sophie ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege et al

in Neuropsychologia (2009), 47(12), 2672-6

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual ... [more ▼]

Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) relying predominantly on familiarity for recognition, research has suggested that they may be particularly susceptible to memory illusions driven by conceptual fluency. Using the Jacoby and Whitehouse [Jacoby, L.L., & Whitehouse, K. (1989). An illusion of memory: False recognition influenced by unconscious perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 118, 126-135] illusion paradigm, we extended these findings and found that AD patients were also sensitive to perceptually driven false recognition. However, AD patients were equally able to disregard perceptual fluency when there was a shift in the sensory modality of the study and test stages. Overall, these findings support the notion that patients with AD can be susceptible to fluency-based memory illusions but these patients can strategically control the fluency attribution following their metamemory expectation in exactly the same way as elderly adults and young adults. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecificity of Inhibitory Deficits in Normal Aging and Alzheimer's Disease
Collette, Fabienne ULiege; Schmidt, Christina ULiege; Scherrer, Christine et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2009), 30

Deficits of suppression abilities are frequently observed in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. However, few studies have explored these deficits in the two populations simultaneously using a large ... [more ▼]

Deficits of suppression abilities are frequently observed in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. However, few studies have explored these deficits in the two populations simultaneously using a large battery of tasks. The aim of the present study was to explore if the pattern of performance presented by elderly subjects and AD patients is in agreement with theoretical frameworks [Wilson, S.P., Harnishfeger, K.K., 1998. The development of efficient inhibition: Evidence from directed forgetting tasks. Dev. Rev. 18, 86-123; see also Nigg J.T., 2000. On inhibition/disinhibition in developmental psychopathology: views from cognitive and personality psychology and a working inhibition taxonomy. Psychol. Bull. 126, 220-246], distinguishing between the concepts of inhibition (a voluntary suppression of irrelevant information) and interference (an automatic suppression process occurring prior to conscious awareness). The results obtained demonstrated that (1) there is an alteration of the inhibitory process in normal elderly subjects; (2) inhibitory and interference resolution processes are quantitately less efficient in AD, since these patients present a correct performance only for information which leaves weak traces in memory. [less ▲]

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See detailAbnormal neural filtering of irrelevant visual information in depression
Desseilles, Martin ULiege; Balteau, Evelyne ULiege; Sterpenich, Virginie et al

in NeuroImage (2009), 45(Suppl. 1),

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See detailNeurobiological bases of suicidality in major depression
Desseilles, Martin ULiege; Scwartz, Sophie; Dang Vu, Thanh et al

in World Journal of Biological Psychiatry (2009), 9(Suppl. 1),

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See detailCounseling des accompagnants de patients Alzheimer: Modification du coping par une (in)formation cognitive
Adam, Stéphane ULiege; Quittre, Anne ULiege; Salmon, Eric ULiege

in Adam, Stéphane; Allain, Philippe; Aubin, Ghislaine (Eds.) et al Actualités en rééducation neuropsychologique: Etudes de cas (2009)

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See detailNeuropsychological analysis of gait disturbances during dual task in MCI patients
Lekeu, Françoise ULiege; Gillain, Sophie ULiege; Warzee, Emmanuelle ULiege et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2009), 13(Supp 1),

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See detailInterest of Locometrix compared with others clinical tests to assess gait’s profile in some specific old populations
Gillain, Sophie ULiege; Warzee, Emmanuelle ULiege; Maquet, Didier ULiege et al

in Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging (The) (2009), 13(Supp 1),

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See detailMultivariate analysis of cognitive profiles in Alzheimer's disease
Bastin, Christine ULiege; Leclercq, Yves ULiege; Collette, Fabienne ULiege et al

in Proceedings of the 8th bi-annual Meeting of the Belgian Society for Neuroscience (2009)

The neuropsychological profiles of patients with early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) appear to be heterogeneous. In this study, we examined whether this heterogeneity corresponds to the existence of ... [more ▼]

The neuropsychological profiles of patients with early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) appear to be heterogeneous. In this study, we examined whether this heterogeneity corresponds to the existence of cognitively distinct subtypes of AD or rather to impairments along a continuum of performances in different cognitive domains. A large group of 187 AD patients recruited in the European project NEST-DD performed a neuropsychological battery. A factor analysis of cognitive performance identified three factors, which respectively reflected attentional/instrumental function, declarative memory and executive function. Three clustering methods were applied on the factor scores in order to explore the existence of separate groups. The clustering methods indicated that cognitive profiles among the patients were sufficiently variable to identify clusters, but there was continuity between clusters rather than clear-cut subtypes. Moreover, clusters corresponded to various combinations of relatively impaired and preserved functions, suggesting multidimensional distribution within a large population of patients. Finally, clusters of cognitive profiles were characterized by different levels of metabolism in brain regions commonly (but variably) involved or relatively preserved in AD. [less ▲]

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